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July 09, 2020, 12:44:22 am

Author Topic: HSC Physics Question Thread  (Read 548145 times)  Share 

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Coolmate

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3900 on: March 29, 2020, 05:48:05 pm »
0
Hey Everyone,

Currently, I am structuring my notes around the syllabus dot points and I am just wondering how other people structure/ structured their HSC Physics Notes, for example:

For Module 5 and Module 6, did you just put the concepts around the specific dot point on one page, then put example calculations next to/ on the next page?

Thanks :)
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BlackFrost

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3901 on: May 14, 2020, 10:53:17 am »
0
So i've a got question regarding Module 2, and I'm wondering if my response makes sense.
World-class hurdlers raise their centre of mass as little as possible when they jump over the hurdles.
Why?

My response: Each time a hurdler jumps over the hurdles, their kinetic energy decrease until it totally becomes the gravitational potential energy at the highest point. Thus, by raising their centre of mass as little as possible, their kinetic energy will be higher, thus their velocity increases, allowing them to cross the hurdles in less time.

Please comment on my response; if I have used the wrong terminology or something doesn't make sense.
Thx  :)



Coolmate

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3902 on: May 29, 2020, 11:27:01 pm »
+3
So i've a got question regarding Module 2, and I'm wondering if my response makes sense.
World-class hurdlers raise their centre of mass as little as possible when they jump over the hurdles.
Why?

My response: Each time a hurdler jumps over the hurdles, their kinetic energy decrease until it totally becomes the gravitational potential energy at the highest point. Thus, by raising their centre of mass as little as possible, their kinetic energy will be higher, thus their velocity increases, allowing them to cross the hurdles in less time.

Please comment on my response; if I have used the wrong terminology or something doesn't make sense.
Thx  :)

Hey BlackFrost! :D

Sorry if this is a late response.

Great answer, I would suggest a few things though:

🔆 Define Key Terminology; such as Gravitational Potential Energy

🔆 Include the GPE formula, you learn in Yr 11; U = mgh --> This supports your response (and including a relevant formula into your response may be part of the marking guidelines)

🔆 Try to avoid saying, "Thus", twice in a sentence, as you can replace this with other synonyms like, "Thereby"

I hope this helps!
Coolmate 8)
« Last Edit: May 29, 2020, 11:37:51 pm by Coolmate »
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r1ckworthy

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3903 on: May 30, 2020, 11:19:33 am »
+3
Hey Everyone,

Currently, I am structuring my notes around the syllabus dot points and I am just wondering how other people structure/ structured their HSC Physics Notes, for example:

For Module 5 and Module 6, did you just put the concepts around the specific dot point on one page, then put example calculations next to/ on the next page?

Thanks :)
Coolmate 8)

Hey Coolmate,

Sorry for the incredibly late response  ;D. I would say that the way you structure notes completely depends upon you. For myself, I didn't bother with writing down example calculations as they made my notes excessively long, and I could always figure out the maths behind a question. But if you are someone who struggles with maths, then, by all means, go for it! It all depends on your strengths and weaknesses. My weakness was memorisation of the larger concepts and facts, so I would make my notes as concise and explanatory as possible so that I could get a document to revise from and get the bigger picture. The key with notes is that they provide you with the big picture so that you know how those tiny little details fit into the overarching concept. This helps a ton with memorisation, at least for me.

Hope that helps! Again, sorry for the late response!

R1ckworthy
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Coolmate

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3904 on: May 30, 2020, 02:14:03 pm »
+1
Hey Coolmate,

Sorry for the incredibly late response  ;D. I would say that the way you structure notes completely depends upon you. For myself, I didn't bother with writing down example calculations as they made my notes excessively long, and I could always figure out the maths behind a question. But if you are someone who struggles with maths, then, by all means, go for it! It all depends on your strengths and weaknesses. My weakness was memorisation of the larger concepts and facts, so I would make my notes as concise and explanatory as possible so that I could get a document to revise from and get the bigger picture. The key with notes is that they provide you with the big picture so that you know how those tiny little details fit into the overarching concept. This helps a ton with memorisation, at least for me.

Hope that helps! Again, sorry for the late response!

R1ckworthy

Hey r1ckworthy,

Thankyou for your response! I think I might do a combination of both a few example questions and write about the big concepts as well. :)

Thanks again,
Coolmate 8)
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Coolmate

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3905 on: May 31, 2020, 07:09:21 pm »
0
Hey everyone :)

Could someone please help me with this question (attached), I know I have to use Wein's Law, but am a bit confused...

Thanks!
Coolmate 8)
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Einstein_Reborn_97

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3906 on: May 31, 2020, 08:08:32 pm »
+5
Hey everyone :)

Could someone please help me with this question (attached), I know I have to use Wein's Law, but am a bit confused...

Thanks!
Coolmate 8)
Hi Coolmate,

Yes, you'll have to use Wien's Law.

A wavelength of 263 nanometres is in the ultraviolet part of the electromagnetic spectrum (between about 350nm - 10nm). Therefore, we won't be able to see it as our eyes cannot see wavelengths smaller than about 350 nanometres.

Hope that helps, let me know if you have any further questions! ;)
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Coolmate

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3907 on: May 31, 2020, 08:18:59 pm »
+1
Hi Coolmate,

Yes, you'll have to use Wien's Law.

A wavelength of 263 nanometres is in the ultraviolet part of the electromagnetic spectrum (between about 350nm - 10nm). Therefore, we won't be able to see it as our eyes cannot see wavelengths smaller than about 350 nanometres.

Hope that helps, let me know if you have any further questions! ;)

Ohhh! Ok, thankyou so much Einstein_Reborn_97! This makes so much sense now, I think I just got confused with the wording of the question. ;D

Thanks again!
Coolmate 8)
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Coolmate

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3908 on: June 01, 2020, 08:42:53 pm »
0
Hey everyone,

When converting from nanometres into metres is it x10^-9 or x10^-7?

Thanks,
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Einstein_Reborn_97

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3909 on: June 01, 2020, 08:46:29 pm »
+2
Hey everyone,

When converting from nanometres into metres is it x10^-9 or x10^-7?

Thanks,
Coolmate 8)
Hey Coolmate,

It's \(\times10^{-9}\)
Nine and nano both start with n - that should help you remember ;)
« Last Edit: June 01, 2020, 08:56:16 pm by Einstein_Reborn_97 »
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Coolmate

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3910 on: June 01, 2020, 08:51:43 pm »
0
Hey Coolmate,

It's /(\times10^{-9}\)
Nine and nano both start with n - that should help you remember ;)

Thanks
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Coolmate

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3911 on: June 16, 2020, 03:00:39 pm »
0
Hi Everyone! :D

I have a practical assessment task for Physics soon (finding slit separation distance) and there is a part that wants us to look at "Experiment Analysis", does this just essentially mean answering questions on, Reliability, Validity and Accuracy of the experiment or something else?

Thanks in advance!
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Chocolatepistachio

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3912 on: June 18, 2020, 09:11:35 pm »
+2
Hi,
I donít do physics but I think it means analysing your results and coming to a conclusion based on that and interpretation of the results and explain what the results mean,  reliability and how reliable it was, improvements that can be made to the experiment, whether the results were consistent with expectations and did or did not support the hypothesis

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3913 on: June 21, 2020, 08:10:25 pm »
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Hi,
I donít do physics but I think it means analysing your results and coming to a conclusion based on that and interpretation of the results and explain what the results mean,  reliability and how reliable it was, improvements that can be made to the experiment, whether the results were consistent with expectations and did or did not support the hypothesis

Thanks Chocolatepistachio! This was very helpful.

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JaimeFreeze

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Re: HSC Physics Question Thread
« Reply #3914 on: June 23, 2020, 07:29:12 pm »
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Can someone please explain if inflation came before or after annihilation? I thought it was annihilation first because inflation separates the matter from anti-matter and stopping lonely particles from annihilating but Iím not sure. I've heard mixed statements so I would appreciate it if you could give reasoning behind your answer.

Thanks!