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August 04, 2020, 04:12:24 pm

Author Topic: 'Rear Window' ultimately depicts women as dependent on men. Discuss.  (Read 226 times)  Share 

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vchs

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Can anyone help me with this essay?

Owlbird83

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Re: 'Rear Window' ultimately depicts women as dependent on men. Discuss.
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2020, 05:42:08 pm »
+8
Hey vchs, welcome to the forums!

(Rear Window has left my mind a bit but I'm looking through my notes and have found some things that might give you some ideas)
I would perhaps structure my essay:

Para 1: -Talk about how Hitchock's female characters initially are presented to fit 1950s gender stereotypes of submissive and delicate /dependent
- Lisa obeying Jeff's commands
- Lisa's dresses --> objectifying, appearances 'not wearing the same dress twice'
- 'Nagging wife' --> annoying, dependent
- 'Miss Torso' 'Miss Lonelyhearts' --> labelling, objectifying

Para2: -Men portrayed as more powerful
-'shut up'
- women(Stella and Lisa) serve Jeff
 OR
 Marriage is the expected outcome for women in this time period
- Miss Torso/Miss Lonelyhearts
- Lisa showing Jeff ring on finger

Para3: As the film progresses, the female characters break out of the stereotypes/ initial portrayals/ their independence is demonstrated
- Lisa's daring acts, letter + garden
- Lisa's outfit juxtaposed with her act of breaking into Thorwald's apartment shows that she can be true to herself/stay herself while being independent/brave/fitting Jeff's ideals
- Final scene --> Lisa's smile --> maybe she had the power after all/ got what she wanted without conforming

Hope that gives you a few ideas!  :)
2018: Biology
2019: Chemistry, Physics, Math Methods, English, Japanese
2020: Bachelor of Psychology (Monash)

vchs

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Re: 'Rear Window' ultimately depicts women as dependent on men. Discuss.
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2020, 09:20:33 pm »
+1
Thank you for some ideas!

Do you perhaps have any ideas or sample paragraphs on Lisa being a hero in Rear Window?

Owlbird83

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Re: 'Rear Window' ultimately depicts women as dependent on men. Discuss.
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2020, 09:43:27 pm »
+6
Thank you for some ideas!

Do you perhaps have any ideas or sample paragraphs on Lisa being a hero in Rear Window?

This was from my essay about Lisa being the hero/protagonist of the film. I hope it gives you some ideas and is helpful, please don't steal it word for word:)

Conversely, as the film progresses, Lisa becomes more significant in her role in driving the film. Lisa’s initial presentation of herself as ‘Lisa. Carol. Freemont’, with the illumination of the lamps establishes her as important, a focal point in the plot. Lisa drives the plot with her quest for marriage, this is evident when there is a clear halt in the storyline when Jeff asserts his wishes to leave their relationship at a ‘status quo’. Lisa is an integral part of the plot and garners admiration when she begins to reveal her adventurous nature with her daring act of slipping the notes under Thorwald’s door, highlighting that she is more than just ‘the girl [she] thought [she] was’. The close up of Jeff’s unguarded smile of awe conveys his pride for Lisa. Furthermore, Lisa’s continued bravery of risking ‘getting [her] neck broke’ while searching in the garden and Thorwald’s apartment prompts the audience to see her as the true hero of the film. Lisa’s costume of a flowy floral dress and heels are contrasted with her actions of climbing up a ladder and precariously through a window. This underscores Lisa’s ability to remain still herself while also conforming to Jeff’s ideals to get what she wants. Simultaneously, Jeff’s incapacitation and uselessness in emphasized when his helpless expression is captured in a closeup, while Lisa’s diegetic screams for ‘Jeff!’ are heard. It is in the last scene where the audience is left with a sense that Lisa is the central character in the film. Lisa’s swapping of ‘High in the Himalayas’ for a ‘Harper’s Bazaar’ magazine implies that she has gotten what she has intended all along without having to considerably change herself. This notion is confirmed in her subtly smug smile, suggesting that she is the one who holds the most power.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2020, 09:45:30 pm by Owlbird83 »
2018: Biology
2019: Chemistry, Physics, Math Methods, English, Japanese
2020: Bachelor of Psychology (Monash)

vchs

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Re: 'Rear Window' ultimately depicts women as dependent on men. Discuss.
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2020, 11:25:57 pm »
+1
Thank you for the reference, appreciate it!

Bri MT

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Re: 'Rear Window' ultimately depicts women as dependent on men. Discuss.
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2020, 09:29:07 am »
+1
Hey,

This clearly isn't for the English Language subject but I'm not sure if it's mainstream English or literature - can someone reply saying which one it is so the thread can be moved to the right section?

Owlbird83

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Re: 'Rear Window' ultimately depicts women as dependent on men. Discuss.
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2020, 09:54:38 am »
+1
Hey,

This clearly isn't for the English Language subject but I'm not sure if it's mainstream English or literature - can someone reply saying which one it is so the thread can be moved to the right section?
Mainstream English, thanks
2018: Biology
2019: Chemistry, Physics, Math Methods, English, Japanese
2020: Bachelor of Psychology (Monash)