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September 28, 2020, 10:51:59 pm

Author Topic: UMEP Maths Assignment 2  (Read 900 times)  Share 

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redleafbun

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UMEP Maths Assignment 2
« on: April 29, 2020, 04:41:06 pm »
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Hey guys, I just got started on my UMEP assignment 2 (a bit last minute  :'()
I am confused on how to approach question 2? Like am I supposed to test out all 10 vector space axioms???

Tau

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Re: UMEP Maths Assignment 2
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2020, 04:43:51 pm »
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Hey guys, I just got started on my UMEP assignment 2 (a bit last minute  :'()
I am confused on how to approach question 2? Like am I supposed to test out all 10 vector space axioms???


Yep, youd need to demonstrate all 10 of them hold, or that any one does not. And knowing what rigour Anthony requires, Id suggest you show each and every step in excruciating detail.
2018: Physics [46 ~ 48], Methods [41 ~ 46]
2019: UMEP Mathematics Extension [First Class Honours (H1)], English [44], Specialist [42 ~ 52], Algorithmics (HESS)
ATAR: 99.50

2020 - Bachelor of Science, The University of Melbourne

redleafbun

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Re: UMEP Maths Assignment 2
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2020, 07:14:59 pm »
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Yep, youd need to demonstrate all 10 of them hold, or that any one does not. And knowing what rigour Anthony requires, Id suggest you show each and every step in excruciating detail.

Right right, but I am still confused by what the question wants? x and y are both vectors, and x is between -1 to 1, we need to prove x+y is (-1, 1)? Is that it?

Tau

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Re: UMEP Maths Assignment 2
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2020, 07:21:01 pm »
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Right right, but I am still confused by what the question wants? x and y are both vectors, and x is between -1 to 1, we need to prove x+y is (-1, 1)? Is that it?

The question states that x, y are both vectors that belong to the vector space consisting of all 'x' where 'x' is a real number in the interval (-1, 1). It is **not** saying that only x is between (-1,1), the first 'x' is bound just within the definition of the vector space. Both x and y are in (-1,1) as they both belong to the vector space.

You need to prove that for arbitrary vectors in the vector space (here called x, y)  that all of the 10 vector space axioms hold for the given definitions of scalar multiplication and vector addition; or that one or more of the vector space axioms do **not** hold.
2018: Physics [46 ~ 48], Methods [41 ~ 46]
2019: UMEP Mathematics Extension [First Class Honours (H1)], English [44], Specialist [42 ~ 52], Algorithmics (HESS)
ATAR: 99.50

2020 - Bachelor of Science, The University of Melbourne