Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

December 11, 2019, 05:07:38 am

Author Topic: Roach Case Explanation  (Read 942 times)  Share 

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

misskaraleah

  • Journalist Extraordinnaire
  • Victorian
  • Forum Obsessive
  • ***
  • Posts: 284
  • I believe impossible is possible to overcome
  • Respect: +1
Roach Case Explanation
« on: September 27, 2008, 03:49:44 pm »
0
Can someone please clarify the Roach Case in 2007.

I'm unsure how it relates to the implied rights within the constitution.

Would be much appreciated :)

xox.happy1.xox

  • Guest
Re: Roach Case Explanation
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2008, 10:12:26 pm »
0
Hmm... I would rather prefer to the Theophanous case or the Australian Television Broadcast Case. I think these are far more easier approaches to fathom, and the Theophanous case is even fun to research about, all whilst still relating to implied rights. :D

misskaraleah

  • Journalist Extraordinnaire
  • Victorian
  • Forum Obsessive
  • ***
  • Posts: 284
  • I believe impossible is possible to overcome
  • Respect: +1
Re: Roach Case Explanation
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2008, 01:06:28 pm »
0
ill have a look thanks :)

xox.happy1.xox

  • Guest
Re: Roach Case Explanation
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2008, 09:04:01 pm »
0
No worries ;)

russdog

  • Victorian
  • Adventurer
  • *
  • Posts: 22
  • Respect: +11
Re: Roach Case Explanation
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2008, 05:39:58 pm »
0
i think the Roach Case (2004 i think it is) and Aus Cap TV Case can both be used as examples of Implied Rights.
This is what I say:
The Australian High Court has played a significant role in the interpretation of human rights through its interpretation of the Constitution.
For example, in the Australian Capital Television Case of 1992, the court stated that political communication is necessary to be able to discuss and make informed decisions on who should represent the public in Parliament.
Likewise, in The Roach Case 2004, the High Court Judge made the interpretation that people with a jail term of less than three years should be able to make an informed decision and hence, to have their right to vote and thus, formed an implied right.
Both of these implied rights came about through High Court interpretation of S7 and 24 of the Constitution, stating that members of the Senate and House of Representatives respictively should be chosen directly by the people, ie elected. 
With very few rights actually entrenched within the Constitution, interpretation of the the Constitution has become important.