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November 19, 2019, 11:39:42 pm

Author Topic: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings  (Read 439205 times)  Share 

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insanipi

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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #390 on: December 04, 2017, 04:49:26 pm »
+7
Subject Code/Name: PSC1012 Physiology II

Workload:
2x 1 hr lectures weekly
4x 3 hour labs
6x ˝ hour quizzes

Assessment:
Participation/Active learning- 5%
Labs- 20%
Online quizzes- 15%
Debate- 10%
Exam- 50% (Hurdle)


Recorded Lectures: 
Yes, with screen capture


Past exams available:
Yes, 1 available on Moodle, multiple practice questions were also available.

Textbook Recommendation:
Human Physiology- Fox, mostly useful for Male & Female Reproductive systems and kidneys

Lecturer(s):
Dr Betty Exintaris
Dr John Haynes
Dr Jen Short (Unit Coordinator)
A/Prof Paul White


Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 2

Rating: 3 out of 5

Your Mark/Grade: 69 C (bombed the exam, but happy I passed :) )

Comments:
Some of the lectures weren’t worth watching/attending as I could have learnt better from the textbook.
The debate was fun- my team got the negative side, and one of us got really salty, ended up doing really well for that assessment.
Also the exam was harder than expected (general consensus).
Next year, this unit is called BPS1012 - Human Physiology II: Body systems .

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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #391 on: December 04, 2017, 04:52:08 pm »
+6
Subject Code/Name: PSC1022 Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry II

Workload:
2x 1 hr lectures weekly
6x 1 hr tutes
5x 3 hour labs
3x 3 hour computer labs

Assessment:
Participation/Active learning- 5%
Labs (labs + comps)- 20%
Mid-Semester Test- 15%
Tutes- 10% (the 6th one wasn’t assessed)
Exam- 50% (Hurdle)


Recorded Lectures: 
Yes, with screen capture


Past exams available:
Yes, 2 available on Moodle, multiple practice questions were also provided on the lecture slides.

Textbook Recommendation:
Introduction to Organic Chemistry- Brown and Poon (5th Edition)

Lecturer(s):
Dr David Manallack (Unit Coordinator)
A/Prof Philip Thompson
Dr Elizabeth Yuriev

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 2

Rating: 3 out of 5

Your Mark/Grade: 77 D

Comments:
This unit was a bit of a mess, the tutesheets ended up preceeding the content in a couple of instances, and Phil rushed through most of his content (he took us for 8 topics out of 11). Was pretty sad that they didn’t include nucleic acids much on the exam. Elizabeth’s lectures were the highlight of the unit- by far the most interesting topic (coordination compounds).
Next year, this unit is called BPS1022- Medicinal chemistry II: Reactivity and biomolecules.

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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #392 on: December 04, 2017, 04:52:54 pm »
+7
Subject Code/Name: PSC1032 Physical Chemistry II

Workload:
2x 1 hr lectures weekly
6x 3 hour workshops
3x 3 hour labs

Assessment:
Participation/Active learning- 10%
Labs- 10%
Written Assignment- 15%
Workshops- 15% (one wasn’t assessed)
Exam- 50% (Hurdle)


Recorded Lectures: 
Yes, with screen capture


Past exams available:
Yes, 3 available on Moodle, multiple practice questions were also provided on the lecture slides.

Textbook Recommendation:
Atkin’s Physical Chemistry- 7th Edition, Atkins
Martin’s Physical Pharmacy- 4th & 7th Editions, Sinko
Physicochemical Principles of Pharmacy- Florence

Lecturer(s):
Dr Ben Boyd
Dr Ian Larson
Dr Elizabeth Yuriev (Unit Coordinator)

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 2

Rating: 5 out of 5

Your Mark/Grade: 78 D

Comments:
By far one of the most enjoyable units- I don’t have any other comments to say (except that Elizabeth is probably my alltime fave lecturer).
Next year, this unit is called BPS1032 - Physical chemistry II: Solutions, surfaces and solids .

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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #393 on: December 04, 2017, 04:55:47 pm »
+7
Subject Code/Name: PSC1042 Multi-disciplinary Pharmaceutical Science

Workload:
3x 1 hr lectures weekly
6x 4 hour presentation sessions
3x 3 hour lab tours

Assessment:
3x 30% Group Oral Presentations
1x 10% Individual Press Release


Recorded Lectures: 
Yes, with screen capture


Past exams available:
No exams for this unit.

Textbook Recommendation:
None recommended

Lecturer(s):
Dr Ben Capuano (Unit coordinator)
A/Prof Michelle McIntosh (Course Director)
Dr Laurence Orlando
Dr Sab Ventura

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 2

Rating: 4 out of 5

Your Mark/Grade: 72 D

Comments:
This was a highly enjoyable unit, especially as we got really creative for the last group assessment, which lead to me spraying whipped cream on my arm.
I also 10/10 recommend going to the lab tours- plenty of FREE food was provided!
Next year, this unit is called Pharmaceutical Science in context.


Mod edit - fixed broken link
« Last Edit: December 04, 2017, 05:20:01 pm by K888 »

Glasses

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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #394 on: December 04, 2017, 05:41:20 pm »
+7
Subject Code/Name: LAW1114 - Criminal Law 1

Workload:
Weeks 4-12: 2x 2 hour lectures each week.
Weeks 8-12: 1x 1 hour tutorial/workshop each week (not compulsory, but you need to go (at least to some), as this is where you get assigned and complete your oral presentation).
NOTE: The unit does not begin until week 4, because students need the prerequisite knowledge from the first 4 weeks of Foundations of Law.

Assessment:
Case analysis and report (Case Note) - 30%. This will be the first Case Note for most law students, and therefore, many students find it difficult. The assignment has two parts, and all students complete the Case Note on the same case. For part one, you analyse the material facts of the case and the reasons for the decisions of the judge(s). For part two (which is worth more marks), you write an essay (of sorts) evaluating the decisions of the judges in light of a number of factors. It's very important (if not essential) to make use of the resources on the Library webpage; and specifically, the information on how to write a case note on the 'Research and Learning Online' page. It might also be worth going to the Law Library and seeking assistance if required.
Oral presentation/plea making exercise - 10%. Students receive a mock case in their workshops and are allocated into groups of 2 or 3. One student will be the prosecutor for the case, and the other(s) will be counsel for the defendant(s). Within your group, you partake in sentence/plea negotiations (outside of class). You then individually conduct a plea presentation to the 'Magistrate/Judge' in one of your workshops, arguing why the court should give your client a certain sentence (based on sentencing principles). Your presentation should not go over 5 minutes.
Written report on plea making exercise - 10%. This is basically a reflective report on your plea negotiation and what you learned from the exercise.
Exam - 50%. The exam is open book and students are given 2 hours writing time and 30 minutes reading/noting time. The exam is divided into three main topics/types of offences - offences against the person, sexual offences and homicide. Therefore, only topics 5-8 are directly examined (although the other topics, except for sentencing, are assumed knowledge).

Recorded Lectures:
Yes and No. Lectures are recorded (with screen capture, I believe), however, they can only be accessed by some students (e.g. those who have a long-term medical condition which requires that they have access to recorded lectures).

Past exams available:
Yes. There are a couple available, and you go through one in your week 12 lectures. Additionally, your workshop booklet contains a number of practice problems which are similar to those in the exam.

Textbook Recommendation: I purchased the prescribed textbook. If you're really strapped for cash, you can probably get by without it - however, it is definitely helpful and your weekly readings are drawn from it.

Lecturer(s): My lecturer was Heli Askola, the chief examiner. I can't say much about the other lecturers, however I can say that Heli is absolutely fantastic. So far, she is easily my favourite lecturer. She is extremely knowledgeable and is simply fucking hilarious. I genuinely enjoyed her lectures and found them very engaging.

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 1.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Comments: I thoroughly enjoyed this subject. I liked the fact that the assessments were spread out across a number of different tasks, and I found the subject content really interesting. From what I've heard, all of the lecturers were really good and knowledgeable. Some students might feel thrown into the deep end with the Case Note, however, that's simply what uni is like, and it's a really good learning experience. Perhaps the only downside of this unit is that lectures aren't recorded and accessible for all students.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 07:12:22 pm by Glasses »
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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #395 on: December 05, 2017, 05:46:31 pm »
+7
Subject Code/Name: ATS1281 – Understanding Crime: An Introduction

Workload:
1x 1 hour lecture each week.
1x 1 hour tutorial each week (compulsory).

Assessment:
Online Quizzes - 10%. Students complete Moodle quizzes throughout the semester. These are based on the weekly readings and the Academic Skills Development videos. Each quiz is worth 1% or 2%, and you usually have at least 10 days to complete each quiz in your own time. Students also had more than one attempt on these quizzes, meaning you could basically each quiz once, see the correct answers and do it again to get 100%. Therefore, these quizzes are easy marks.
Essay Plan - 5%. Students are given a template for their essay plan, and outline their contention, arguments (and how these link to their contention) and evidence. As long as you follow the essay plan template and your essay seems to be on-track and relevant, you should receive 5/5 marks.
Major Essay - 45%. The essay is worth 45% of your overall mark and should be around 1,500 words (+/- 10%). The essay question, marking rubric and other information are supplied early in the semester on Moodle, as well as a heap of information on how to write the essay.
Exam - 40%. The exam is closed book and students are given 2 hours writing time and 10 minutes reading time. Our exam was divided into two parts – one part an essay, and the second part a series of short-answer questions. For both parts, students got to choose which questions to answer out of the available options (e.g. 1 out of 4 essay questions, and 2 out of 4 short-answer questions).

Recorded Lectures:
Yes, with screen capture.

Past exams available:
No – however, students were given a fair bit of information on what the exam questions would be, so you can prepare for the exam based on this information.

Textbook Recommendation: I purchased the prescribed textbook, however it isn’t really essential. Whilst the online quizzes are based on the textbook readings, you can probably get by and still get 100% on each quiz without it.

Lecturer(s): The lecturers changed, depending on the topic. I can’t actually remember their names, except for the unit coordinator, Jarrett Blaustein. In my opinion, Jarrett was the best lecturer and was the most engaging. However, the other lecturers were pretty good too – except for one, whose lectures were very disengaging and dry.

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 1.

Rating: 3.75 out of 5

Comments: All in all, this unit was pretty good (especially for a first year unit which usually aren’t very in-depth). The subject content was interesting most of the time, and the unit was structured (and the content assessed) pretty well. Lectures covered the following topics: Crime and Criminology in general, Classical Criminology, Positivist Criminology, the Ecology of Crime, Strain Theory, Social Learning Theory, Labelling and Control Theory, Gender and Crime, Crimes of the Powerful and ‘Doing’ Criminology. I will note, however, that at times the content did seem quite dry, and the tutorials weren’t very beneficial. That being said, I probably would recommend the unit – especially if you’re after a relatively interesting unit with a lighter workload and few contact hours.
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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #396 on: December 05, 2017, 08:14:06 pm »
+8
Subject Code/Name: PSY1011 - Psychology 1A

Workload:
1x 2 hour lectorial (basically a lecture) each week.
1x 2 hour consultation (basically a tutorial) each week (non-compulsory).

Assessment:
Weekly online quizzes - 15%. There is a multiple choice quiz each week, which assesses your understanding of the readings. These quizzes are completed using ‘LockDown Browser’, which prevents you from accessing anything other than the quiz during the 20 minutes you have to complete it. The quizzes are therefore supposed to be completed closed-book, however obviously, there would be students who complete these quizzes open-book by using their textbook, phone, etc. Whilst you complete 10 online quizzes, only the scores from your best 5 are used.
Oral report and written summary - 20%. This assessment is divided into two parts. For the first part, students research and summarise the key aspects three articles, which relate to one of four topic areas. For the second part, students create an audio and visual presentation (e.g. using PowerPoint and the recording feature) where they describe the three articles in more detail, and discuss why they are relevant to their chosen topic area.
Critical thinking exercise (literature review) - 15%. This is a 1000 word analysis of the similarities, differences, strengths and weaknesses of at least 7 articles relating to one of the four topics provided in the oral report and written summary. Again, students have to research the articles themselves, and ensure that they are relevant to the topic area.
Exam - 50%. The exam is closed book and students are given 2 hours writing time and 10 minutes reading time. The exam features around 100 multiple choice questions, and assesses your knowledge of the reading and lectorial material. The exam is also a hurdle, so you need 45%+ on the exam to pass. I personally found the exam questions a bit easier than the weekly quiz questions, however the exam did feature a couple of curveball questions that I assume most students simply guessed.

Recorded Lectures:
Yes, with screen capture.

Past exams available:
No, however students are given access to a revision quiz on Moodle (although I personally didn’t find it very useful or similar to the actual exam).

Textbook Recommendation: The prescribed textbook is a custom textbook for this unit (and PSY1022), and it is pretty important. Since the weekly quizzes are based on the textbook (as well as the exam, to quite a large extent), it is pretty essential if you’re aiming for a 75+ score (in my opinion); however, you should still definitely be able to pass without it.

Lecturer(s): There were a number of different lecturers who taught different topics throughout the semester. All in all, the lecturers were okay – some were good, some were bad.   

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 1.

Rating: 2.5 out of 5

Comments: Like many past students, I was disappointed with this unit. Whilst the subject area was relatively interesting (although very, very similar to VCE Psychology), the unit and assessments were poorly organised. Firstly, far too much content (most of which was unrelated) was squeezed into 12 weeks – making it virtually impossible to learn everything you needed to know. Secondly, the assessments in the unit were a mess. The assignment instructions were very ambiguous, unclear, and at times contradicting with what tutors were saying, as well as the assessment criteria. There were also cases of different tutors telling students different things regarding what was actually required in the assessments. In turn, this resulted in assignments being marked very strangely and inconsistently. Lastly, many students (including myself) found the consultations very pointless and unhelpful; and found that they were better off learning primarily from the textbook, rather than the lectorials.
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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #397 on: December 05, 2017, 09:11:12 pm »
+8
Subject Code/Name: LAW1112 – Public Law and Statutory Interpretation

Workload:
2x 1.5 hour lectures in weeks 1-8 and week 12.
1x 1.5 hour workshop in weeks 9-11.
3x 1 hour library workshops over the semester.

Assessment:
Test – 30%. This is a one hour, open-book Moodle test which students complete in week 4 (in their own time). There are three questions, each worth 10 marks, and the test assesses the content taught in topic 1 (introduction to Australian Government), topic 2 (Parliament) and topic 3 (Executive). For each question, you basically write an extended response, and are required to use cases, legislation, etc. as evidence. The test isn’t excessively difficult; however, you need to type, think critically and evaluate whatever you’re discussing very quickly – which is probably the hardest part of the test.
Library research quiz - 10%. This is a multiple-choice, untimed quiz completed in Week 10. It assesses your ability to research legislation and case law, and write effectively – so basically the skills and content covered in the library workshops. You shouldn’t find the quiz very hard, and if you attended the library workshops, you should be able to get 100%.
Exam - 60%. The exam is open book and students are given 2 hours writing time and 30 minutes reading/noting time. Before the exam, students are given a piece of legislation which the statutory interpretation part of the exam will be based on. For this part of the exam, you are required to present arguments for how various parts of the legislation should be interpreted (for both sides), in light of the problem provided in the exam. This part of the exam is worth the most marks, so you should dedicate the majority of your time to it. The other part of the exam assesses your understanding of topic 4 (the Judiciary) and topic 5 (the interrelationship of the three branches in the context of human rights). Students are given two questions (one assessing each topic) and are required to provide extended responses to the questions (like the Moodle Test in week 4).

Recorded Lectures:
Yes and no. Lectures are recorded (with screen capture, I believe), however, they can only be accessed by some students (e.g. those who have a long-term medical condition which requires that they have access to recorded lectures). Additionally, because the lectures are interactive and involve student discussion, the recorded lectures may not be very useful.

Past exams available:
I don’t think so – however, the practice problems looked at in the statutory interpretation workshops in weeks 9-11 are similar to the problem provided in the exam.

Textbook Recommendation: I purchase the prescribed textbook ‘Australian Public Law’ and found it quite useful for topics 1-5. However, I wouldn’t say the textbook is essential, because a fair bit of information on the topics is provided on Moodle. Although that being said, I would still recommend students try and get a copy of the textbook because it definitely is helpful.

Lecturer(s): My lecturer was Oyiela Litaba who I thought was quite good. I found her lectures pretty engaging and she was very approachable, friendly, and was happy to meet up with students before assessment tasks. I did hear negative things about the other lecturers, however, especially one who notoriously concluded a lecture because the students weren’t answering (or couldn’t answer) her questions.

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 2.

Rating: 3.75 out of 5

Comments: Overall, I thought PLSI was pretty good. It is the sister subject of FoL, so there is a bit of crossover between the subjects. However, PLSI focuses more on evaluating and critical thinking, and teaches statutory interpretation in much greater depth. The library workshops, whilst a bit dry, were quite useful – especially those which covered legal research. However, the statutory interpretation workshops in weeks 9-11 weren’t my favourite, and were too long in my opinion. Not many students enjoy PLSI, and whilst some of the content is dry, a lot of it is pretty important (especially the statutory interpretation stuff).
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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #398 on: December 06, 2017, 03:53:32 pm »
+6
Subject Code/Name: LAW1113 – Torts

Workload:
2x 1.5 hour lectures each week.
1x 1 hour tutorial in weeks 6-12 (non-compulsory).

Assessment:
Research assignment (case note) – 30%. Similar to Criminal Law 1, students are required to complete a case note worth 30% of their final mark. The assignment has two parts, and all students complete the case note on the same case. For part one, you analyse the material facts of the case and the reasons for the decisions of the judge(s). For part two (which is worth more marks), you write an essay (of sorts) evaluating the decisions of the judges in light of a number of factors.
Exam - 70%. The exam is open book and students are given 2 hours writing time and 30 minutes reading/noting time. Students are given a single problem scenario and are required to discuss the different torts that may be present. In your answer, you need to follow the ‘IRAC’ formula (or something similar), and talk about the various elements of each tort, salient features, counterarguments, defences, etc. In my opinion, the hardest part of the exam was the time constraints. It is virtually impossible to discuss everything there is to discuss in the 2 hours you’re given, so you need to write succinctly and fast – but know that literally no one will be able to talk about everything.

Recorded Lectures:
Lectures are recorded (with screen capture, I believe), however, they can only be accessed by some students (e.g. those who have a long-term medical condition which requires that they have access to recorded lectures).

Past exams available:
Yes, and you go through one in your week 12 lectures. Additionally, your workshop booklet contains a number of practice problems which are similar to those in the exam.

Textbook Recommendation: I purchased the prescribed textbook, but didn’t use it very much. It definitely has a lot of useful information in it, however, I was able to get by with lecture slides and the Monash LSS Sketchnotes. If you have the money, I’d purchase it – but if not, you should be okay.

Lecturer(s): My lecturer was Gerry, who was great. His lectures were very engaging and informative, and his lecture slides were quite detailed (which I liked). I also heard good things about the other lecturers; although some negative things about the chief examiner.

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 2.

Rating: 4 out of 5

Comments: Overall, I really enjoyed Torts. I found the content very interesting and the lectures and tutorials very useful. The unit started off with an introduction to torts and alternative compensation schemes (e.g. TAC and WorkCover). We then learnt about the different types of trespass – including false imprisonment and trespass to land. We also looked at private nuisance, before covering negligence for several weeks. Lastly, we looked at pure mental harm and vicarious liability. However, whilst I did find the content interesting and the lectures and tutorials helpful, there were a couple of issues with the unit. Firstly, I didn’t like the fact that the exam was worth 70% of your overall mark. Rather than having the exam worth such a significant portion of your mark, I would have liked if the case note was worth more than 30%, or an additional assessment task. Secondly, the case note instructions we received were a bit dodgy – i.e. they were the exact same instructions we received in semester 1 for the criminal law case note. The main issue with this was that the instructions said things like “prosecution”, which was rather confusing since there is no prosecution in civil law. Nevertheless, I did quite enjoy Torts, and it was probably my favourite unit for the semester.
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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #399 on: December 06, 2017, 03:56:35 pm »
+5
Subject Code/Name: ATS1282 – Criminal Justice: An Introduction

Workload:
1x 1 hour lecture each week.
1x 1 hour tutorial each week (compulsory).

Assessment:
Online Quizzes - 15%. Students complete Moodle quizzes throughout the semester. These are based on the weekly readings. Each quiz is worth 2% or 3%, and you usually have at least 7 days to complete each quiz in your own time. The main difference between these quizzes and those in ATS1281 however is that students only had one attempt on these quizzes, as opposed to having unlimited attempts.
Essay Plan - 5%. Students are given a template for their essay plan, and state which essay question they’ve chosen, and outline their contention, arguments (and how these link to their contention) and evidence. As long as you follow the essay plan template and your essay seems to be on-track and relevant, you should receive 4-5/5 marks.
Research Essay - 40%. The essay is worth 40% of your overall mark and should be around 2,000 words (+/- 10%) – 500 words more than the ATS1281 essay. The essay question, marking rubric and other information are supplied early in the semester on Moodle, so you should try and get started on the essay early in the semester.
Exam - 40%. The exam is closed book and students are given 2 hours writing time and 10 minutes reading time. In the exam, students had to write two essays. For the first essay, all students were given the same question; however, the question was rather broad so there were different approaches students could take in their essays. For the second essay, you got to choose from four different essay questions.

Recorded Lectures:
Yes, with screen capture.

Past exams available:
No – however, students were given a little bit of information on what the exam questions would be (although not as much as was provided in ATS1281), so you can prepare for the exam based on this information.

Textbook Recommendation: I purchased the prescribed textbook, however it wasn’t really necessary. However, I believe the textbook is changing next year, so the new textbook might be more helpful and important than the one used this semester.

Lecturer(s): The lecturers changed, depending on the topic – however all of the lecturers were quite good in my opinion. All of the lecturers were very knowledgeable, and were generally quite engaging.

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 2.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

Comments: From an objective standpoint, ATS1282 is pretty good. The unit is organised quite well, and covers a range of different topics. Over the semester, we covered the following topics – policing (roles and styles), policing and the community, courts (trial and evidence), courts (determining guilt), sentencing and punishments, social inequality and access to justice, victims and victimology, punishment, penalty and prisons, crime prevention and juvenile justice. Clearly, the unit had quite a lot of breadth – but unfortunately, did not have enough depth. Instead of cramming a heap of different topics into the unit, I personally would have preferred to cover a couple of topics in greater detail; however, in the unit’s defence, it is an introductory unit. The other important thing to note with this unit is that it covers a lot of the content
taught in VCE Legal Studies and first year law. Now, this can either be a good or a bad thing. On the plus side, it means you enter the subject with a lot of background knowledge and therefore, do not have to put as much effort into remembering and learning the content. However, on the downside, it can make the unit very disengaging and boring. Personally, I found the unit very repetitive and a bit boring. However that being said, the unit does introduce students to a number of new topics, which are quite enjoyable. Therefore, if you’re thinking about taking ATS1282, know that it is an introductory unit.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 03:59:03 pm by Glasses »
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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #400 on: December 06, 2017, 03:57:20 pm »
+6
Subject Code/Name: PSY1022 - Psychology 1B

Workload:
1x 2 hour lectorial (basically a lecture) each week.
1x 2 hour consultation (basically a tutorial) each week for 8 weeks (non-compulsory).

Assessment:
Weekly online quizzes - 15%. There is a multiple choice quiz each week, which assesses your understanding of the readings. These quizzes are completed using ‘LockDown Browser’ which prevents you from accessing anything other than the quiz during the 20 minutes you have to complete it. However, I will mention that some quizzes were completed without LockDown, because of technical issues. Of the 12 quizzes you complete, the scores from your best 10 contribute to your final mark.
Research proposal plan - 10%. Despite the name (and some of the instructions provided), this assignment isn’t actually a research proposal plan. Instead, the assignment requires students to research one of three topics (social psych, abnormal psych or cognitive psych) and find at least 3 articles relating to the (pretty specific) topic. You then discuss the similarities and differences between these articles, and the limitations and knowledge gaps in the area of research.
Research proposal - 25%. For this assignment, you are required to design a study and write a research proposal (as the name suggests). You have a 1,500 word limit, and your research proposal needs to have the following: A title, abstract, introduction (including an aim and hypothesis), method section, results section, discussion and reference list.
Exam - 50%. The exam is closed book and students are given 2 hours writing time and 10 minutes reading time. The exam has 96 multiple choice questions, with 48 on psychological discovery, 16 on cognitive psych, 16 on social psych and 16 on abnormal psych. The exam is also a hurdle, so you need 45%+ on the exam to pass. A lot of the exam questions were poorly written, and some featured content which wasn’t directly covered in the lectorials (which was a bit annoying).

Recorded Lectures:
Yes, with screen capture.

Past exams available:
No, however students are given access to a revision quiz on Moodle (although I personally didn’t find it very useful or similar to the actual exam).

Textbook Recommendation: The prescribed textbook is a custom textbook for this unit (and PSY1011), and it is pretty important. The other prescribed textbook is a psychological discovery textbook – however I didn’t purchase it, so I can’t comment on how useful it is.

Lecturer(s): There were a number of different lecturers who taught different topics throughout the semester. The main lecturer who taught psychological discovery was Joshua Wiley. He was pretty good, and his lecture slides were very detailed – however I found what he was teaching quite boring, so I found his lectures quite disengaging at times.

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 2.

Rating: 2.5 out of 5

Comments: Unfortunately, a lot of the issues present in PSY1011 were also present in PSY1022. Whilst the actual unit schedule felt a bit more organised that PSY1011, the assignments were still very poorly organised. The assignment instructions for the research proposal plan were very unclear and contradicting. In the unit guide, different Moodle forums and consultations, it was suggested that students were required to outline the various parts of their research proposal (e.g. hypothesis, aim, etc.); however, the actual assignment instructions required students to research articles and look at gaps in research. Understandably, this caused a great deal of confusion, and many students had no idea how to go about writing the research proposal plan. Another key issue was with the actual teaching of the unit – with consultations feeling quite pointless and going far too long. Nevertheless, I did like the fact that this unit felt less ‘crammed’ than PSY1011; i.e. there were less unrelated topics crammed into one single semester. That being said, I found the psychological discovery part of this unit very dry – and unfortunately, psychological discovery made up half of the unit. The other half of the unit involved cognitive social and abnormal psychology, which were all very interesting (although very similar to VCE Psychology).
2015 - 2016 (VCE): Psychology, Religion & Society, Legal Studies, Business Management, Literature and English
2017 - Present: Bachelor of Laws (Honours)/Arts (Criminology & Psychology) @ Monash University

Aug 2016 - Sep 2018: VIC State Moderator

neemo

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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #401 on: December 17, 2017, 12:26:14 pm »
+6
Subject Code/Name: ETC2410 - Introductory Econometrics

Workload: 2x1 Hour Lectures, 1.5 Hour Comp Lab

Assessment:  10% Assignment 1, 10% Assignment 2, 10% Weekly Homework Submission, 10% Mid-Sem Test, 60% Exam
Up to 5% bonus final marks for helping your peers in the moodle forum!

Recorded Lectures:  Yes, with screen capture

Past exams available:  Yes, they provided the previous 3 semester's actual exam, all of which included a rough marking guide

Textbook Recommendation: "Introductory Econometrics: A Modern Approach 5th edition." Apparently the 6th edition introduced errors so they recommend the 5th. It is prescribed where they say you're disadvantaging yourself by not having it. Personally, I rarely used it. It did help clarify a few things but overall, not that necessary as long as you utilise your other resources well.

Lecturer(s): Farshid Vahid and Natalia Bailey. Farshid lectures for the first 5 weeks then Natalia takes over for the remaining 7 weeks

Year & Semester of completion: Sem 2 - 2017

Rating: 3 out of 5

Your Mark/Grade: 90 HD

Comments:
Assignment 1/2: I hated them so much. They were group assignments where you work with the same group for both assignments. My problem with them was that the task was very vague in that you are given data about a topic (we did race and gender inequality in pay and the housing market) and you had to write a report where you outline information about the data, justification and process of developing a suitable regression model, and inference and conclusion. My tutor encouraged us to work with other groups. I was constantly asking other groups for help because I had no idea how to progress. However, as long as you put some effort it, it seemed to be fairly easy to get some decent marks as average mark for Assignment 1 and 2 was 82 and 75 respectively.

Tutorial/Comp Lab: Every week, you're given tutorial work based on last week's content to do to show your tutor in next week's tutorial. As long as you have done it or attempted it, you get the mark. Each week's work gets you 1 mark so it's basically an easy 10 marks. As there are 11 weeks, you can miss 1 and still get full marks. Each week there is assigned tutorial work to complete. Tutor will guide you through the questions as you follow along using the program 'EViews'. Occasionally, tutors will comment on some of the content and discuss things that students often get wrong. This really helps with the assignments and exam. Stuff my tutor has mentioned has allowed me to score marks I wouldn't have known otherwise.

Mid-Sem Test: 25 MCQ in week 5. Sometimes they'll have subtle wording which can easily throw you off the right answer. Average mark was around 16/25

Content: The first few weeks were awful for me. I found it to be very confusing and difficult to wrap my head around content. Unit begins by teaching regression and introduces you to the 'OLS Estimator'. There are some maths involved which makes it even more confusing. 2nd half of the content involves time series data and forecasting, still using OLS. I feel that I only really got a good understanding of the first few weeks of content at like week 10! Definitely found content easier to understand near the end of the unit which felt rewarding, however, it does take a lot of effort.

Lectures: Because of inconveniences, I mostly skipped the 1st lecture and watched it online but attended the 2nd lecture. Not the most entertaining but was very helpful in developing my understanding of the content. If you can't attend, just watch them online.

Exam: 4 sections worth 15 marks each (60 total, worth 60% of final mark). 1st section is MCQ and each section focuses on a particular topic. e.g.
Section 2 tends to focus on cross-sectional data, section 3 and 4 focus on time series, forecasting, etc., basically the 2nd half of the unit. The past exams give a strong indicator of the format and types of questions asked so definitely do them.

Overall, fairly difficult subject which is unfortunately a core for all commerce specialist students and is quite a big step up from ETC1000. In the end I did find it mildly interesting, but for the average person who won't, I recommend avoiding it if you can.
VCE 2015: Business Management [43]
VCE 2016: English [41] Methods [48] Spesh [46] Accounting [48] Economics [46]
ATAR: 99.65
Uni 2017-2020: Bachelor of Commerce & Commerce Specialist @ Monash Uni

neemo

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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #402 on: December 17, 2017, 01:44:52 pm »
+6
Subject Code/Name: ECC2000 - Intermediate Microeconomics

Workload: Weekly 1x2 Hour Lecture, 1 Hour Tutorial

Assessment: 25% Mid-Sem Test, 10% Weekly Assignments, 5% Tutorial Attendance/Participation, 60% Exam

Recorded Lectures:  Yes, with screen capture

Past exams available:  None

Textbook Recommendation: Prescribed Textbook is "Microeconomics 8th ed, Pearson/Prentice Hall, by Robert Pindyck and Daniel Rubinfeld" but was explicitly mentioned that it is not necessary. Lecture notes are sufficient.

Lecturer(s): Xiaodong Fan

Year & Semester of completion: Sem 2 - 2017

Rating: 2 out of 5

Your Mark/Grade: 96 (HD)

Comments:
Mid-Sem Test: Okay, so this is the strangest test I've ever completed. 4 Questions worth a total 100 Marks. Before I took the test, I was confused as to how it could possibly be 100 marks worth of questions. Turns out the mark allocation was crazy, like really messed up. "Calculate the Elasticity of Demand for marijuana when P=x" - 10 marks. I'm not even exaggerating, the question was actually about the marijuana market and we were given 10% to calculate the price elasticity of demand. This crazy mark allocation actually made me so uncertain about my answers as I'd often have 1-3 lines of working out for a 5-10 mark question. In the end I managed to score full marks, median was 83. Majority got D/HD. Note: no practice mid-sems were given

Weekly Assignments: I don't know how I feel about this system. Every week there is an 'assignment' to complete which is a set of a few questions. You are to hand them in during next week's lecture or upload on moodle. Now, you might suspect that it's a typical 1% per week system since it's worth 10%. Nope, they stated that they'd only mark 2-3 of the assignments in which they don't tell you which ones they'll mark. It gets marked like a test and that grade then contributes to your final mark as opposed to a 'participation' system. For us, they ended up only marking 2. I heard that people messed up by thinking that it's statistically unlikely that they'd choose to mark that particular week's assignment, so they half-assed it only for it to be marked :( Play it safe guys

Tutorial: Simple 1 hour tutorial. Your tutor will go through a set of questions with the class and occasionally get students to participate. My tutor was Michelle who I found was pretty good. She was engaging and helpful with explaining the work. There are 5% of final marks allocated to tutorials. I don't know for sure, but I'm guessing that 4% was attendance and 1% was participation. I think all you had to do was answer 1 question and you became eligible for the last mark.

Lectures: There was only 1 lecture stream to go to. I only attended the 1st and skipped the rest (besides the mid-sem test where you had to be present) to watch them online. While Xiaodong is, without a doubt, a nice lecturer, his accent and continuous pauses does unfortunately make the lecture very difficult to watch/listen to. To be fair, I think this was his first semester lecturing. Hopefully he improves for next time :)

Content: This is a maths focused unit. You'll need to be decent at calculus and algebra skills to solve, for example, the profit-maximising quantity and price given some information. Most skills you would have picked up from 3/4 Methods anyway. From a purely biased view, as maths is my strong point, I found the unit very easy as once you understand the process of solving a particular type of question, you can apply it to any variation of the question. The part I did find most confusing though was the last section on asymmetric information. Unfortunately, I could barely find any resources to help me understand it more clearly. Maybe the textbook would have came in handy here but it wasn't in the exam anyway :P
Also, I feel that there's actually not too much content in the unit. Most of it is just maths application. Although lecture notes were sometimes quite long, many of the pages were filled with various examples and descriptions which if you removed, there wasn't actually a significant amount to learn.

Exam: This time I think it was 6 questions worth 100 marks. Although I expected the mark allocation to be fixed, it ended up being similar to the mid-sem... 5 marks for stating the budget constraint without a coffee club membership, another 5 marks for stating the budget constraint with a coffee club membership. 6% of my final mark came from 2 equations. Exam was definitely more difficult than the mid-sem but I wouldn't say that it was particularly difficult, except perhaps the last question. The first question was copied exactly from one of the weekly assignments which we were actually notified would happen. Note: Similarly to the mid-sem test, no practice exams were given.

Honestly, this unit felt very strange to do. Although I enjoyed some of the maths, everything about it was weird: the lectures, assignments, mid-sem test and exam. I felt that it was too easy to be a 2nd year intermediate unit as the amount of content we covered was quite low compared to my other units. An issue I had with this unit was the lack of resources given. No practice mid-sem or exam papers were given. I ended up redoing the tutorial work and weekly assignments 3-4 times each. Ignoring the strangeness, I did find it interesting since it's maths and micro combined! Assuming the unit remains like this, ECC2000 will likely be a WAM booster for many as 35.78% of the cohort received a final mark of HD with 30.73% further receiving a D. I think that might even be higher than ECC1000 marks lol
VCE 2015: Business Management [43]
VCE 2016: English [41] Methods [48] Spesh [46] Accounting [48] Economics [46]
ATAR: 99.65
Uni 2017-2020: Bachelor of Commerce & Commerce Specialist @ Monash Uni

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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #403 on: January 17, 2018, 09:36:37 pm »
+4
Subject Code/Name: EDF1303 – Understanding learning and learners

Workload:  1x 1-hour lecture, 1x 2-hour tutorial

Assessment:
2x Online Quizzes (10% ea., 20% total)
1x Academic Poster (20%)
1x Reflective Essay on Learning (60%)

Recorded Lectures:  Yes, with screen capture

Past exams available: n/a

Textbook Recommendation: Gindidis, M, Phillipson, S, Pruyn, M, & Pham, T. (Compilers). (2017). Understanding Learning and Learners. (Monash 2nd. Custom Edition) Pearson (ISBN: 9781488617973)

That was the prescribed textbook and was a new introduction to 2017. If you want to do well, it’s best to try and get a copy of the book somehow or borrow it when you need it. Quiz questions are based on the textbook, and it is quite helpful to use it as part of your references for the assignments.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Gindidis and Dr Melissa Barnes are the main lecturers, but there are sometimes guest lecturers.

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 1

Rating: 2.5 out of 5

Your Mark/Grade: HD

Comments:
If you want me to add something to this that I haven’t mentioned or what me to expand on something, pm me and I’ll try to edit it in.

Lectures
The lecturers are somewhat entertaining and try to keep the energy up with some interactive activities, however, it was a little annoying that not all the content would be sufficiently talked about simply because there was not enough time due to too much of it, or the lecturer taking up time with something else (e.g. anecdotes). Go to the first lecture or two, then decide if you’ll just watch the rest. The unit ‘ends’ at the end of week 10, so no lectures in week 11 or 12.

Tutorials
Tutorials are non-compulsory, but it’s good to go to them to meet others and get to know your tutor a little. Tutors use a slideshow that has various activities on them that relate to the week’s content. The unit runs on a flipped classroom model, which means students are doing the majority of the work, whilst the tutor facilitates it and keeps everything moving. Same as the lectures, no tutorials in week 11 or 12.

Readings
The readings start out short, but suddenly get very long. A majority of people didn’t really do the longer readings, including myself. I recommend just running over the lecture slides and noting down some of the main headings in the reading in your head, so that if you do go to the tutorials, you aren’t sitting there clueless.

Assessments
2x Online Quizzes (10% ea., 20% total): 20 questions each quiz, all multiple choice. These are fairly straightforward and easy marks if you have the textbook. They are done through Moodle and have a set time on when they open and close. The tutorial leading up to and during the week of when the quiz closes often goes through practice questions with answers (some which come from the question bank itself). The first quiz has no time limit and can be attempted multiple times (but you will not be told your mark until the closing time). The second quiz has a time limit of 45 minutes and only 1 attempt (again, you won’t be told your mark until the closing time). The coordinators themselves encourage you to open your textbook if you don’t know the answer to a question, so don’t be afraid to do so with these quizzes.

1x Academic Poster (20%): This assignment requires a poster to made that explores and demonstrates a learning theory, and how it can be used to analyse learning. I can’t find anything explicitly stating this, but I believe the word count was set at 800 words or equivalent (equivalent because images and diagrams can ‘count’ as more words than what they have). They said a physical poster is fine to make, but I highly recommend making it electronically with a program (I made mine in an A3 PowerPoint slide and exported it as a pdf); you have to submit it electronically anyway. The main feedback people had was that their poster looked more like an essay rather than a poster (because it was filled with walls of text). Personally, it was very hard to not make the poster look like walls of text (and I had about 550 words plus visuals), it really comes down to how well you can condense your information or utilise visuals. There is one tutorial near the due date that gives all students in that tutorial a chance to share ideas and understand the task in groups that were based on how far you’ve gone through it (not started, to finished), which proved helpful. I recommend starting this early, or at least gathering and writing up all your research early so you can turn it into a poster later on.

1x Reflective Essay on Learning (60%): This is the major assignment, and has a word count of 2400 (give or take 10%). It can seem daunting in the early stages when the lecturers/tutors are introducing you to the assignment (the way it was described seemed weird to me), but just structure the essay based on the rubric and check in early with your tutor rather than later. The idea of the essay is to reflect on a ‘learning episode/experience’ you had in a formal setting, and analyse what occurred in terms of a chosen topic. The topic can be any topic from the textbook. I recommend looking at the topics, and trying to think of an experience to fit them, then pick the experience that a topic easily and explicitly links to (in turn, allowing you to write a lot about it). For example, my experience was about group work and peer-to-peer teaching, and I linked it to a topic that focused on the social facilitation of learning in a classroom. Biggest tip I can give is to start this one early!. During the week of the last lecture, all tutorials are turned into support sessions, where you only come in if you need assistance on the essay or require your tutor to check over a draft/ideas.

I, personally, didn’t really enjoy the unit, but I didn’t absolutely hate it. It was boring, no doubt about that. It’s all very theory and reflection based, but think of it as a gateway to helping you notice some things teachers or students do while you’re on professional placement or fieldwork. If you have a real passion for teaching, no unit should stop you. :)
VCE | Lit [37], Eng [44], Psy [45], FurM [42], ComInf [47] - ATAR | 96.70
2017~ | BA @ Monash (Psychology, Korean studies, Philosophy)
Units (pm for info/request reviews)
2017 | EDF1303 PSY1011 ATS1171 ATS1338 EDF1304 PSY1022 ATS1172 ATS1835
2018 | PSY2061 PSY2071 ATS2173 ATS1371 PSY2042 PSY3320 ATS3089 ATS2946
2019 | PSY3041 PSY3051 ATS2866 ATS2720 PSY3032 PSY3062 ATS2280 ATS2727

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Re: Monash University - Subject Reviews & Ratings
« Reply #404 on: January 17, 2018, 09:38:39 pm »
+6
Subject Code/Name: EDF1304 – Understanding teaching for learning

Workload:  1x 1-hour lecture, 1x 2-hour tutorial

Assessment:
1x Exploring and interpreting curriculum essay (40%)
1x Critiquing teaching and learning group presentation (20%)
1x Critiquing teaching and learning essay (40%)

Recorded Lectures:  Yes, with screen capture

Past exams available: n/a

Textbook Recommendation: Gindidis, M., Phillipson, S., Pham, T., & Pruyn, M. (Comp.). (2016). Understanding Teaching for Learning. (Custom) (2nd Ed.). Pearson Australia (ISBN: 9781488616495).

That was the prescribed textbook. If you want to do well, it’s best to try and get a copy of the book somehow or borrow it when you need it. It’s quite helpful to use it as part of your references for the assignments.

Lecturer(s): Dr Maria Gindidis and Dr Melissa Barnes are the main lecturers, but there are sometimes guest lecturers. There is 1 week where NEiTA teachers come in to give a QnA and demonstrations of their teaching style in tutorials.

Year & Semester of completion: 2017, Semester 2

Rating: 2.5 out of 5

Your Mark/Grade: HD

Comments:
If you want me to add something to this that I haven’t mentioned or what me to expand on something, pm me and I’ll try to edit it in or reply to you.

Lectures
Repeated from EDF1303 review
The lecturers are somewhat entertaining and try to keep the energy up with some interactive activities, however, it was a little annoying that not all the content would be sufficiently talked about simply because there was not enough time due to too much of it, or the lecturer taking up time with something else (e.g. anecdotes). Go to the first lecture or two, then decide if you’ll just watch the rest.

Tutorials
Tutorials are non-compulsory, but there is a group assignment which is presented in one of the tutorials. The groups are also made during one of the tutorials. As with EDF1303, tutors use a slideshow that has various activities on them that relate to the week’s content. The unit runs on a flipped classroom model, which means students are doing the majority of the work, whilst the tutor facilitates it and keeps everything moving.

Readings
Repeated from EDF1303 review
The readings start out short, but suddenly get very long. A majority of people didn’t really do the longer readings, including myself. I recommend just running over the lecture slides and noting down some of the main headings in the reading in your head, so that if you do go to the tutorials, you aren’t sitting there clueless.

Assessments
1x Exploring and interpreting curriculum essay (40%): Word count was 1600 words (give or take 10%). This essay involves exploring the definition of curriculum, and discussing a chosen curriculum/curricula (preferably relevant to your specialisation), summarising a chosen school’s philosophy, then linking the philosophy to the curriculum. This was a very odd task. A lot of people misunderstood the part where you had to pick a certain curriculum/curricula (it’s best to consult your tutor when you get up to this to really make it clear), and some struggled to find school philosophies that were dense enough to discuss and make links to. It’s generally a very straightforward essay in terms of content once you have an appropriate school philosophy. During one of the tutorials, there is time to get help depending on how far you are into the essay (similar to EDF1303).

1x Critiquing teaching and learning group presentation (20%): I believe the time limit was 7 minutes, however, this seemed to be very dependent on who your tutor was, as some of my friends in other tutorial groups got 10 minutes maximum and 7 minutes minimum. There were 3 or 4 case studies in the form of videos that are posted onto Moodle, and each group picks one to analyse and critique the teaching methods used and how effective it was for learning based on a set of guiding questions. Minus having to organise time to meet with your group members, this is an easy assignment, and it was marked very leniently (a LOT of HDs were given out). I recommend creating a Google document as soon as possible for all the group members to edit and access, so all the information and research is in one place (this becomes relevant for the next assignment). The presentations happen during tutorials, so despite the tutorials having no attendance requirement, you should at least show up to all tutorials until the presentation due week is over.

1x Critiquing teaching and learning essay (40%): Word count was 1600 words (give or take 10%). This is the same as the group presentation, however, it’s an essay and you’re required to be more in-depth with your critique and analysis. The Google doc from the group presentation comes in handy here, but do not copy word for word or chunks of anything you said or had on your slides. This is an individual essay, despite having done research and analysis as groups already, so plagiarism and collusion rules still apply. Again, a very straightforward essay, and very easy if you have solid notes from the group assignment.

My overall feelings about this unit are in line with my feelings about EDF1303.
VCE | Lit [37], Eng [44], Psy [45], FurM [42], ComInf [47] - ATAR | 96.70
2017~ | BA @ Monash (Psychology, Korean studies, Philosophy)
Units (pm for info/request reviews)
2017 | EDF1303 PSY1011 ATS1171 ATS1338 EDF1304 PSY1022 ATS1172 ATS1835
2018 | PSY2061 PSY2071 ATS2173 ATS1371 PSY2042 PSY3320 ATS3089 ATS2946
2019 | PSY3041 PSY3051 ATS2866 ATS2720 PSY3032 PSY3062 ATS2280 ATS2727