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January 24, 2020, 07:40:29 pm

Author Topic: Psych U4 Q's Thread!  (Read 22699 times)  Share 

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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #30 on: July 05, 2011, 09:55:09 pm »
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How does punishment differ from extinction? Explain with reference to an example.

I'm unsure on how to phrase this answer although I know punishment decreases the likelihood of a response occurring and extinction refers to the gradual decrease in the strength or rate of a conditioned response via consistent non-reinforcement...
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Zafaraaaa

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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #31 on: July 06, 2011, 01:27:50 am »
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Help please :)

Q- Explain how TMS could be used to study brain areas in learning

Thanks!
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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #32 on: July 06, 2011, 02:56:10 pm »
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Help please :)

Q- Explain how TMS could be used to study brain areas in learning

Thanks!

TMS can be used to study brain areas involved with learning as TMS is often used to inhibit the functioning of neurons at a particular site in the brain. When neurons are inhibited using TMS neural pathways are are interrupted and if that neural pathway is associated with a particular task, then the participant will display impaired performance. TMS can be used to show impaired levels of learning in particular regions of the brain.
‎"We divert our attention from disease and death as much as we can; and the slaughter-houses and indecencies without end on which our life is founded are huddled out of sight and never mentioned, so that the world we recognize officially in literature and in society is a poetic fiction far handsomer and cleaner and better than the world that really is."
- William James.

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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #33 on: July 08, 2011, 01:17:10 am »
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Q- What is a disadvantage of "Shaping"?

Thanks
"Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle" -Plato

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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #34 on: July 08, 2011, 06:24:11 am »
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Q- What is a disadvantage of "Shaping"?

Thanks

Shaping is also known as the method of successful approximations so if a response was misunderstood then they be rewarded for a behaviour other then that desired.

I can't find any strengths or limitations, but I assume that in shaping the chance of them being rewarded would be much greater then normal.
‎"We divert our attention from disease and death as much as we can; and the slaughter-houses and indecencies without end on which our life is founded are huddled out of sight and never mentioned, so that the world we recognize officially in literature and in society is a poetic fiction far handsomer and cleaner and better than the world that really is."
- William James.

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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #35 on: July 08, 2011, 06:44:26 pm »
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Can someone please provide real life examples of stimulus generalisation and stimulus discrimination in regards to operant conditioning?
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Zafaraaaa

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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #36 on: July 08, 2011, 08:54:48 pm »
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Can someone please provide real life examples of stimulus generalisation and stimulus discrimination in regards to operant conditioning?

Stimulus generalisation - could be that a child plays around a candle lit flame and they burn their finger (consequence of behaviour). Stimulus generalisation would be that they'd avoid ALL sorts of similar flame, such as that of a stove, fireplace to ensure that such behaviour and consequence does not recur. In this case, stimulus generalisation would help the child to apply the consequence of one stimulus generally, so it would help them survive
Stimulus discrimination could be shown, for example, if a person (who once tried to feed a crow) was pecked on/attacked by the crow (consequence).. so in the future they may become operantly conditioned to fear ONLY crows and not any other similar black coloured bird
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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #37 on: July 08, 2011, 08:56:20 pm »
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Interesting. You took the flame example from classical conditioning and used it for operant.

y didn't I think of that ???
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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #38 on: July 10, 2011, 01:17:07 pm »
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Is mental illness used interchangeably with mental disorder or is there a distinct difference?
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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #39 on: July 10, 2011, 03:10:20 pm »
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Nomenclature in the biological sciences is absolutely terrible, they're interchangeable afaik but you'll probably get some textbook that defines them differently

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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #40 on: July 10, 2011, 03:13:45 pm »
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How would you differentiate physical health from physical illness in ~3sentences (ie- don't use the massive definitions provided by the book...)
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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #41 on: July 10, 2011, 04:58:39 pm »
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How would you differentiate physical health from physical illness in ~3sentences (ie- don't use the massive definitions provided by the book...)
I haven't done this section yet, but if information from HHD 1&2 is relevant here then I'd say:

Physical health refers to the body and the *effective functioning* of its systems. It incoorporates a person's physical capacity to take part in physical activity and is influenced by other physiological aspects such as body weight for height, levels of cholesterol/blood pressure and flexibility of muscles and joints

Physical illness on the other hand refers to an *impairment in the functioning* of the body and it's systems. This could be due to chronic disease or caused by other physiological factors such as obesity/overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol or nutrient deficiencies. Physical illness hinders one from taking part in physical activity and usually restricts the flexibility of muscles and joints
"Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle" -Plato

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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #42 on: July 10, 2011, 05:01:04 pm »
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Sweet.

If you're interested Grivas defines it as:

Physical health refers to the body’s ability to function efficiently and effectively in work and leisure activities, to be in good condition, to resist disease and to cope in threatening or emergency situations.

Physical illness refers to our subjective experience of a disease or physical health problem that interferes with the normal functioning of our body and adversely impacts on our ability to function efficiently in everyday life.
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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #43 on: July 11, 2011, 02:43:41 am »
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I've got a question in regards to brain imaging techniques for learning.
In the Nelson Psychology book, it states: "However, modern brain imaging technologies such as CT scans, PET scans, SPECT scans, MRI scans and fMRI scans provide clear evidence, that, during learning, changes occur in neurons that can result in permanent structural and functional changes in the brain."
Is this statement completely true? Would it be more true to say it provides clear evidence of learning or that it infers learning occurs?
Bleh.

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Re: Psych U4 Q's Thread!
« Reply #44 on: July 11, 2011, 12:27:55 pm »
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I've got a question in regards to brain imaging techniques for learning.
In the Nelson Psychology book, it states: "However, modern brain imaging technologies such as CT scans, PET scans, SPECT scans, MRI scans and fMRI scans provide clear evidence, that, during learning, changes occur in neurons that can result in permanent structural and functional changes in the brain."
Is this statement completely true? Would it be more true to say it provides clear evidence of learning or that it infers learning occurs?

I think you generalise learning occurs as some patients with brain damage may will have problems learning in certain parts of the brain.
‎"We divert our attention from disease and death as much as we can; and the slaughter-houses and indecencies without end on which our life is founded are huddled out of sight and never mentioned, so that the world we recognize officially in literature and in society is a poetic fiction far handsomer and cleaner and better than the world that really is."
- William James.