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August 24, 2019, 11:45:29 pm

Author Topic: 2011 VN'ers Psychology U3 Questions Thread  (Read 31070 times)  Share 

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Slumdawg

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2011, 07:00:46 pm »
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It depends on what they give you though. If it's just < then obviously it's less than. But if it's < with a line underneath then it's less than or equal to. They usually set the p value at less than or equal to 0.05 (as seen in the grivas book) but it depends on the scenario. So I guess there's no outright answer you just have look at the case study you have been given.

Just read pg 72 of grivas and that should answer your question :)
« Last Edit: January 06, 2011, 07:14:14 pm by Slumdawg »
2010 ATAR: 98.35 - Psychology [50] Media Studies [47
2011-'13: Bachelor of Biomedicine [Neuroscience Major] at Melbourne Uni 
2014-'17: Doctor of Medicine (MD) at Melbourne Uni 


iNerd

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2011, 07:29:33 pm »
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It depends on what they give you though. If it's just < then obviously it's less than. But if it's < with a line underneath then it's less than or equal to. They usually set the p value at less than or equal to 0.05 (as seen in the grivas book) but it depends on the scenario. So I guess there's no outright answer you just have look at the case study you have been given.

Just read pg 72 of grivas and that should answer your question :)
Yeah, less than or equal to. Thanks!

burbs

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2011, 07:33:11 pm »
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Here's a question about the course/book:
Why the hell is this book so big? Seriously its >800 pages. My two legal textbooks (school and other) are only marginally more than this.

Slumdawg

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2011, 07:39:51 pm »
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Here's a question about the course/book:
Why the hell is this book so big? Seriously its >800 pages. My two legal textbooks (school and other) are only marginally more than this.
haha I think that's where the difficulty comes in. The sheer amount of content can be quite overwhelming, so if you want to do really well you need to start early. As first you'll need to get a basic understanding of everything, then you'll need to perfect your knowledge in each area and then finally refine your exam technique. (I started fully preparing for each exam roughly 1.5 months in advance, but that's just me) If you think about it though, you'll only have to learn half of that thick book for each exam so that's a plus. Psych has always been one of those subjects that just has HEAPS of stuff to learn hence the thick textbook to match. The book does contain a large number of case studies or extra bits of information in those green boxes which don't really need to be learned but could further deepen your understanding of a topic. So if you took them away from the book it'd be a bit thinner :S

« Last Edit: January 06, 2011, 07:41:54 pm by Slumdawg »
2010 ATAR: 98.35 - Psychology [50] Media Studies [47
2011-'13: Bachelor of Biomedicine [Neuroscience Major] at Melbourne Uni 
2014-'17: Doctor of Medicine (MD) at Melbourne Uni 


burbs

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2011, 07:41:12 pm »
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Ah yes. The green boxes, I'll leave them for later like in BM (never touch them).

Also, I hear definitions need to be word for word from textbooks? T/F

Slumdawg

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2011, 07:51:50 pm »
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Ah yes. The green boxes, I'll leave them for later like in BM (never touch them).

Also, I hear definitions need to be word for word from textbooks? T/F
F.

Definitely a myth, you need to learn key words though. Some definitions aren't even correct in the textbooks! So don't just learn the ones from the book. Most definitions have one key word which must be mentioned to get the mark. So if you just understand what the concept is and you know the key word which must be included then you can create a definition off the top of your head and still get full marks. I wouldn't waste my time with memorising huge amounts of definitions. Only memorise the ones that don't seem to stick in your head and you find you're having trouble with.

I think this myth arose from the fact that psychology requires very precise answers. Regurgitating textbook definitions doesn't really equate to precise answers.
2010 ATAR: 98.35 - Psychology [50] Media Studies [47
2011-'13: Bachelor of Biomedicine [Neuroscience Major] at Melbourne Uni 
2014-'17: Doctor of Medicine (MD) at Melbourne Uni 


iNerd

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2011, 07:52:05 pm »
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Ah yes. The green boxes, I'll leave them for later like in BM (never touch them).

Also, I hear definitions need to be word for word from textbooks? T/F
False overall but key words have to be included (speak to vexx, poor guy lost 3marks over one word). An example would be for 'EEG' you have to use the key words 'detect, amplify and record'

EDIT: Beaten

burbs

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2011, 07:55:49 pm »
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Ah yes. The green boxes, I'll leave them for later like in BM (never touch them).

Also, I hear definitions need to be word for word from textbooks? T/F
F.

Definitely a myth, you need to learn key words though. Some definitions aren't even correct in the textbooks! So don't just learn the ones from the book. Most definitions have one key word which must be mentioned to get the mark. So if you just understand what the concept is and you know the key word which must be included then you can create a definition off the top of your head and still get full marks. I wouldn't waste my time with memorising huge amounts of definitions. Only memorise the ones that don't seem to stick in your head and you find you're having trouble with.

I think this myth arose from the fact that psychology requires very precise answers. Regurgitating textbook definitions doesn't really equate to precise answers.

Again like BM. The stories that Psych can be studied in the same way as BM holds true. Huzzah.

Cheers.

Slumdawg

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2011, 07:56:16 pm »
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Ah yes. The green boxes, I'll leave them for later like in BM (never touch them).

Also, I hear definitions need to be word for word from textbooks? T/F
False overall but key words have to be included (speak to vexx, poor guy lost 3marks over one word). An example would be for 'EEG' you have to use the key word 'electrical'

EDIT: Beaten
;)
2010 ATAR: 98.35 - Psychology [50] Media Studies [47
2011-'13: Bachelor of Biomedicine [Neuroscience Major] at Melbourne Uni 
2014-'17: Doctor of Medicine (MD) at Melbourne Uni 


iNerd

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #24 on: January 06, 2011, 08:51:27 pm »
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Is the placebo effect a demand characteristic?

Slumdawg

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #25 on: January 06, 2011, 09:06:02 pm »
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Is the placebo effect a demand characteristic?
The placebo effect is an example of the influence of a demand characteristic, but I don't think it technically is considered an example itself. So all the demand characteristics (cues made by the researcher) accumulate to cause the placebo effect in some participants.
2010 ATAR: 98.35 - Psychology [50] Media Studies [47
2011-'13: Bachelor of Biomedicine [Neuroscience Major] at Melbourne Uni 
2014-'17: Doctor of Medicine (MD) at Melbourne Uni 


iNerd

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #26 on: January 08, 2011, 12:39:32 pm »
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Should we know the T-test as an inferential statistic? (off Eriny's research methods notes :P)

Slumdawg

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #27 on: January 08, 2011, 12:42:34 pm »
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Should we know the T-test as an inferential statistic? (off Eriny's research methods notes :P)
It's not really that big, just know the gist of it and how it's related to the p-value. There's a very low chance of it being examined, but still there's a chance, so just read over it a bit until you have basic understanding of it and you should be fine.
2010 ATAR: 98.35 - Psychology [50] Media Studies [47
2011-'13: Bachelor of Biomedicine [Neuroscience Major] at Melbourne Uni 
2014-'17: Doctor of Medicine (MD) at Melbourne Uni 


Eriny

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #28 on: January 08, 2011, 01:15:19 pm »
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Yeah. You aren't going to get into trouble for knowing too much stuff, though I wouldn't spend a lot of time on it.

Nullisecundus

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Re: 2011 VN'ers Psychology Questions Thread
« Reply #29 on: January 08, 2011, 03:49:54 pm »
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Ah yes. The green boxes, I'll leave them for later like in BM (never touch them).

Also, I hear definitions need to be word for word from textbooks? T/F
F.

Definitely a myth, you need to learn key words though. Some definitions aren't even correct in the textbooks! So don't just learn the ones from the book. Most definitions have one key word which must be mentioned to get the mark. So if you just understand what the concept is and you know the key word which must be included then you can create a definition off the top of your head and still get full marks. I wouldn't waste my time with memorising huge amounts of definitions. Only memorise the ones that don't seem to stick in your head and you find you're having trouble with.

I think this myth arose from the fact that psychology requires very precise answers. Regurgitating textbook definitions doesn't really equate to precise answers.

Again like BM. The stories that Psych can be studied in the same way as BM holds true. Huzzah.

Cheers.

haha yep it sure can
but learning them word-for-word doesnt hurt either if you have the time
:P