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July 16, 2019, 10:42:32 pm

Author Topic: Learn Textbook definitions.  (Read 904 times)  Share 

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misskaraleah

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Learn Textbook definitions.
« on: April 25, 2008, 07:44:53 pm »
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Is it worthy to learn all the definitions in the textbook for the exam?

Because i have heard its best to learn them word for word, and others have claimed this doesnt demonstrate your ability of the content,

Has anyone learnt the defintions word for word and recived high or low marks?

Because im almost finished learning them for visual perception and i dont want to think i didnt have to learn them and waste time.


jess3254

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Re: Learn Textbook definitions.
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2008, 08:57:57 pm »
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I think it's best to be able to explain a particular concept or function in your own words, because this demonstates you understand it adequately. Instead of memorising definitions from the back of your text book, I'd write your own and then refer back to those frequently to refresh your memory.

Eriny

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Re: Learn Textbook definitions.
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2008, 06:53:45 pm »
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I think understanding is enough provided that you can explain the concepts well. Memorising definitions is only really necessary if you either don't know the material (which is bad) or you have a lot of trouble explaining the material in a way that makes sense. Be careful though, because some definitions in psychology have to be specific (e.g. on the 2006 mid-year exam, the definition of a visual illusion caught out a lot of people who probably understood completely what a visual illusion was).

misskaraleah

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Re: Learn Textbook definitions.
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2008, 08:33:04 pm »
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Thats what im concerned with. I feel that teh content in Psychology is easy enough to understand without learning the definitions, yet if it were an exam question and i didnt explain what the definition was word for word, i could get mixed up.

Thanks for the help guys.

costargh

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Re: Learn Textbook definitions.
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2008, 08:50:28 pm »
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Within a definition their are usually a number of characteristics which define that concept/word.

For example in Accounting for a current asset, rather than memorizing a word by word definition I remember that a current asset is
1) a resource controlled by the entity (something the business has control of like Cash @ Bank)
2) as a result of past events ( say, through selling a good to a customer)
3) resulting in inflows of future economic benefits ( the asset will have some form of benefit for the business)
4) next 12 months (benefits to come within the next 12 months)

Those characteristics are all essential to defining a current asset in accounting.

Try applying this approach to some of your Pysch definitions and see if it works =)

misskaraleah

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Re: Learn Textbook definitions.
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2008, 04:00:43 pm »
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Within a definition their are usually a number of characteristics which define that concept/word.

For example in Accounting for a current asset, rather than memorizing a word by word definition I remember that a current asset is
1) a resource controlled by the entity (something the business has control of like Cash @ Bank)
2) as a result of past events ( say, through selling a good to a customer)
3) resulting in inflows of future economic benefits ( the asset will have some form of benefit for the business)
4) next 12 months (benefits to come within the next 12 months)

Those characteristics are all essential to defining a current asset in accounting.

Try applying this approach to some of your Pysch definitions and see if it works =)

Yeah thats a good approach. I think i will learn the definitions by heart- if i have time- then im safe either way. If not i'll adapt your ideas costragh

:)