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August 20, 2019, 04:12:51 am

Author Topic: Harder Physics Questions  (Read 8341 times)  Share 

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QuantumJG

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2010, 10:08:01 pm »
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Suppose that the radius of the Sun were increased to (the average radius of orbit for pluto), that the density of the expanded sun was uniform and that the planets revolved within it. Calculate earths orbital speed within the 'new' sun and what would be the earths new period of revolution.

To solve this I am going to first derive an expression for g



since rEarth < rSun, then let:

MSun =    







I love using Guass's law on spheres! :)

Edit: Now, r = 1.5x109m, = 1.41x103 kg/m3

implying g = 591 m/s2

Now,

vEarth = 941 km/s (31x faster than what speed it orbits at)





implying Edit: T = 1.00x104 s = 2 hours 47 minutes!

So if this were to happen, in theory a year would only be about 2 hours 47 minutes!

Am I right?
« Last Edit: January 31, 2010, 10:39:49 pm by QuantumJG »
2008: Finished VCE

2009 - 2011: Bachelor of Science (Mathematical Physics)

2012 - 2014: Master of Science (Applied Mathematics/Mathematical Physics)

2016 - 2018: Master of Engineering (Civil)

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Semester 2:[/b] Earth Processes for Engineering, Engineering Materials, Structural Theory and Design, Systems Modelling and Design

appianway

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2010, 10:13:40 pm »
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Hmm, that's essentially what I think I described earlier, but I think you have to consider the effect of the buoyancy force (although I could be mistaken, seeing as I've only had it mentioned for around 20 seconds in one lecture), as earth essentially displaces a portion of the sun.

Cthulhu

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2010, 10:38:36 pm »
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Sorry quantumJG, way off :( and the question is to find the orbital velocity of earth... >.>

QuantumJG

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2010, 11:15:47 pm »
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Hmm, that's essentially what I think I described earlier, but I think you have to consider the effect of the buoyancy force (although I could be mistaken, seeing as I've only had it mentioned for around 20 seconds in one lecture), as earth essentially displaces a portion of the sun.

hmm... I never considered that!

I calculated the buoyancy force to be 9.02x1026 N and it's weight to be 3.53x1027 N, implying a force of 2.63x1027 N is pulling the Earth to the Sun's centre.

So

vEarth = 812km/s

T = 11,601 s = 3 hours 13 minutes

Sorry quantumJG, way off :( and the question is to find the orbital velocity of earth... >.>

What is the answer?

Can I have a hint?
2008: Finished VCE

2009 - 2011: Bachelor of Science (Mathematical Physics)

2012 - 2014: Master of Science (Applied Mathematics/Mathematical Physics)

2016 - 2018: Master of Engineering (Civil)

Semester 1:[/b] Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, Engineering Risk Analysis, Sustainable Infrastructure Engineering

Semester 2:[/b] Earth Processes for Engineering, Engineering Materials, Structural Theory and Design, Systems Modelling and Design

Cthulhu

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2010, 11:15:26 am »
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The earths orbital radius still comes into play here.
I suppose I could tell you that there is of course a centripetal force acting on the planet within in the new expanded sun and that gravitational force may still play a part in all of it.

QuantumJG

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2010, 01:15:47 pm »
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The earths orbital radius still comes into play here.
I suppose I could tell you that there is of course a centripetal force acting on the planet within in the new expanded sun and that gravitational force may still play a part in all of it.

I'm really confused?

:(
2008: Finished VCE

2009 - 2011: Bachelor of Science (Mathematical Physics)

2012 - 2014: Master of Science (Applied Mathematics/Mathematical Physics)

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QuantumJG

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2010, 02:35:05 pm »
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I don't understand where I have gone wrong? :(
2008: Finished VCE

2009 - 2011: Bachelor of Science (Mathematical Physics)

2012 - 2014: Master of Science (Applied Mathematics/Mathematical Physics)

2016 - 2018: Master of Engineering (Civil)

Semester 1:[/b] Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, Engineering Risk Analysis, Sustainable Infrastructure Engineering

Semester 2:[/b] Earth Processes for Engineering, Engineering Materials, Structural Theory and Design, Systems Modelling and Design

Cthulhu

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2010, 06:58:38 pm »
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IF YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THE ANSWER DO NOT READ THIS POST
fuck this forums lack of spoiler tags
Sorry. It's a bit rushed. It might not make sense but its the answer none the less.
You're on your own to find the period of orbit though. This is just the major part of the problem.

























First lets define some variables:







Since the density of the expanded sun is uniform we can use to find the mass of the sun within earths orbit. is the density of the sun when the radius is the orbital radius of earth
or while is the density of the sun at radius


solving for we get
and so:

Now using the equations and using because the earth is experiencing a centripetal force. setting these equal to each other we can solve for :
and therefore



QuantumJG

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #23 on: February 01, 2010, 07:59:30 pm »
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IF YOU DON'T WANT TO SEE THE ANSWER DO NOT READ THIS POST
fuck this forums lack of spoiler tags
Sorry. It's a bit rushed. It might not make sense but its the answer none the less.
You're on your own to find the period of orbit though. This is just the major part of the problem.

First lets define some variables:







Since the density of the expanded sun is uniform we can use to find the mass of the sun within earths orbit. is the density of the sun when the radius is the orbital radius of earth
or while is the density of the sun at radius


solving for we get
and so:

Now using the equations and using because the earth is experiencing a centripetal force. setting these equal to each other we can solve for :
and therefore




I) There is a contradiction here! You have stated that the original Sun (I.e. Our real Sun) was not being expanded (I.e. the Sun's expanding it's volume and mass).

M = 1.99x1031 kg

rEarth's orbit =  1.5x109 m

vEarth's orbit = 941km/s

I rest my case!
« Last Edit: February 01, 2010, 08:15:23 pm by QuantumJG »
2008: Finished VCE

2009 - 2011: Bachelor of Science (Mathematical Physics)

2012 - 2014: Master of Science (Applied Mathematics/Mathematical Physics)

2016 - 2018: Master of Engineering (Civil)

Semester 1:[/b] Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, Engineering Risk Analysis, Sustainable Infrastructure Engineering

Semester 2:[/b] Earth Processes for Engineering, Engineering Materials, Structural Theory and Design, Systems Modelling and Design

Cthulhu

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2010, 08:08:13 pm »
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You have no case though. Your first two answers were both different to that and the first answer didn't even answer the question I asked. I worded the question poorly and I apologise; I will re-word it for future generations.

QuantumJG

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #25 on: February 01, 2010, 08:49:31 pm »
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You have no case though. Your first two answers were both different to that and the first answer didn't even answer the question I asked. I worded the question poorly and I apologise; I will re-word it for future generations.

Okay please word the question so we know our data and explain specifically what you want from us.

Okay first I made some mistakes, but fixed them up. Then I investigated appianway's buoyancy idea. It's almost like you want us to fail at this question.

I'm obsessed with getting on my soapbox


2008: Finished VCE

2009 - 2011: Bachelor of Science (Mathematical Physics)

2012 - 2014: Master of Science (Applied Mathematics/Mathematical Physics)

2016 - 2018: Master of Engineering (Civil)

Semester 1:[/b] Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, Engineering Risk Analysis, Sustainable Infrastructure Engineering

Semester 2:[/b] Earth Processes for Engineering, Engineering Materials, Structural Theory and Design, Systems Modelling and Design

Cthulhu

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2010, 09:10:27 pm »
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I don't want you guys to fail. I actually thought it was a pretty good question had I worded it right I'm sure it would have all made sense. I apologise for that and next time I write a question I'll word it carefully to make sure you guys know what I want.

appianway

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #27 on: February 01, 2010, 09:27:01 pm »
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If the buoyancy force isn't considered (hence the only force causing circular motion being the gravitational force), can't it just be found using g like I originally described (equating the two g expressions, although I admittedly didn't know that the density was constant so used the GM/r^2 to find the mass in terms of the radius, but it's still the same general idea *coughcough*).

Good question though. Wording's always a bit tricky. It'd also be interesting to consider any drag forces acting on the body...

Cthulhu

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #28 on: February 01, 2010, 09:36:44 pm »
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I might as well do a survey while I'm here.
Are there any particular areas people are interested in getting questions in?

appianway

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Re: Harder Physics Questions
« Reply #29 on: February 01, 2010, 09:37:58 pm »
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Thermodynamics, physical optics, special relativity, electromagnetism. :)

Oh, and how can I forget... quantum. :)

I probably need practise in geometrical optics too, seeing as it's my least favourite area...