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December 06, 2021, 01:37:17 pm

Author Topic: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984  (Read 2107 times)

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niamh.brazil

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September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« on: September 25, 2021, 12:46:52 am »
+3
Hullo again!

Since we have limited time in our lecture for me to read through all your wonderful thesis writing, this is the thread to copy yours into if you would like feedback! Also feel free to ask any questions about 1984, clarify any areas of confusion from the lecture or just leave your Two Minute Hate for HSC English in the comments - with the year you've had it's definitely justified!

Look forward to seeing your thesis work!

UPDATE: Notes attached to this thread :)
« Last Edit: October 01, 2021, 12:47:28 pm by niamh.brazil »

chaevely_park

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2021, 01:40:48 pm »
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Hello!

I was wondering if you have any recommendations for good related texts for 1984?

Thank you :)

Girisha

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2021, 11:48:30 am »
0
George Orwell's dystopian narrative Nineteen Eighty Four skilfully demonstrates the role of oppressive, totalitarian governments on the fabrication of the human experience to induce loneliness. The repression of individuality, relationships and privacy induces isolation within both the individual and the society as a collective, causing the audience to reflect upon their own context and reconsider the necessary components that contribute to the fulfilling human experience. Orwell's creation of the overbearing, restrictive "Party" and their  manipulation of the human experience and elimination of concepts such as language, identity and culture induce extreme isolation, serving as a cautionary tale for future generations.

aidosss

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2021, 11:51:18 am »
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To what extent does the exploration of human experience in Nineteen Eighty-Four invite you to reconsider your understanding of loneliness?

Composers create stories to effectively reveal both the personal and shared nature of human experiences and the qualities, motivations and emotions arising from these experiences. George Orwell's 1949 dystopian novel 1984 is a didactic warning against totalitarian dictatorship, making his audience aware of the extreme loneliness that can be inflicted upon individuals when the key human values of individuality and freedom are taken away from us.

S_ann

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2021, 11:53:46 am »
+1
Hi!
I was wondering... should our thesis be an argument that is *this leads to this leads to this* or just an overarching statement? Also, should our essay be in chronological order or just chronological within the body paragraph? I'm confused about how we could write a chronological essay with thematic paragraphs.
Thank you :)

S_ann

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2021, 11:59:51 am »
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If possible, can you please check this thesis? Thank you so much :)
Practice thesis: To What Extent Does the Exploration of Human Experiences in 1984 Invite you to Reconsider your Understanding of Loneliness?
Individuals desire fulfilling relationships so, when they are subjugated and therefore isolated, they will search for basic liberties and connections, rebelling against the loneliness of a totalitarian world, however, the need to escape loneliness is inevitably overridden by fear of the authority.

Emily Adams

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2021, 12:01:41 pm »
+3
Hey Niahm!

I'm feeling really behind with English quote banks and have been trying to find that one on the forum you made. Is there any way that you can link where it is or the specific name?

Thanks in advance,
Emily :)

crippledbyenglish

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2021, 12:05:34 pm »
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The dynamic between society and the individual has been epitomised as 'solitude is impracticable and society fatal' (Waldo, 1870). George Orwell's dystopian fiction '1984' (1949) invites the reader to reconsider their perspective of loneliness as inherently negative through exploration of the individual's paradoxical reliance on yet conflict with society. Through Winston, Orwell conveys that despite the non-conformist's desire for intimate connection with both others and the self, the manipulation and subversion of this longing can be employed to obliterate individual autonomy, identity, and relationship. Thus, the text effectively serves as a cautionary tale regarding the dangerous implications of a controlling, totalitarian society, awakening its audience to the complexity and fragility of human experience.

damn

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2021, 12:14:00 pm »
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I was wondering if a one sentence thesis would be sufficient in my introduction (wrote up a quick one below). Also, do you recommend fleshing out the ideas/themes (providing one sentence on each) in the intro, or just listing the themes?

To what extent does the exploration of human experience in Nineteen Eighty-Four invite you to reconsider your understanding of loneliness?

In his cautionary tale ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’, Orwell challenges readers to explore the suppression of individual autonomy within totalitarian regimes thereby, establishing a sense of alienation which inherently corrupts the human experience.

Cheers,
Winston Smith

niamh.brazil

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2021, 12:43:58 pm »
+2
Hello!

I was wondering if you have any recommendations for good related texts for 1984?

Thank you :)

Hey!

For 1984 you have a few options depending on your approach your essay/assignment. If you want to focus on exploring state control and the dystopian genre you have a few options
  • Farenheit 451
  • The Handmaid's Tale (where oppression has a more religious/gendered dimension)
  • Never Let Me Go (more contemporary example)
  • The Circle (also a fairly contemporary book)
  • Blade Runner

Also consider investigating dystopian short stories if that's what interests you but you can't commit to reading a whole novel.

If you're interested in exploring more Orwell's depiction of language and the role of storytelling you can also have a look at these options, which are less concerned with oppressive power:
  • Feel Free - Zadie Smith (collection of essays, you would probably only analyse one)
  • The White Album - Joan Didion (also a a collection of essays)
  • Paterson - beautiful film about a poet
  • Poems by Frank O'Hara - records seemingly mundane parts of the human experience (potentially similar to Winston's diary)

niamh.brazil

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2021, 12:56:33 pm »
+2
George Orwell's dystopian narrative Nineteen Eighty Four skilfully demonstrates the role of oppressive, totalitarian governments on the fabrication of the human experience to induce loneliness. The repression of individuality, relationships and privacy induces isolation within both the individual and the society as a collective, causing the audience to reflect upon their own context and reconsider the necessary components that contribute to the fulfilling human experience. Orwell's creation of the overbearing, restrictive "Party" and their  manipulation of the human experience and elimination of concepts such as language, identity and culture induce extreme isolation, serving as a cautionary tale for future generations.

Hey there! This is a strong intro that deals with the key concepts of the questions well. See below for feedback:

  • Good response to question in first sentence with direct engagement with loneliness
  • Interpretation and audience impact in final sentences is great!
  • Unclear how there is a difference between loneliness as an individual/as a society since society would largely be composed of individuals who each feel isolated.
  • In your introduction try to define "the human experience" using ideas from your text. In this case, what is meant by a "fulfilling human experience"? You can also draw on other writers and thinkers to develop a personal interpretation
  • Individuality and privacy sound like very similar concepts so ensure that the paragraphs are not too repetitive when you write them
  • Really clear expression throughout!

niamh.brazil

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2021, 12:58:08 pm »
+2
Hey Niahm!

I'm feeling really behind with English quote banks and have been trying to find that one on the forum you made. Is there any way that you can link where it is or the specific name?

Thanks in advance,
Emily :)

Hi Emily,

There seems to be a bit of a delay on the forum so I have attached the quotes table to this forum :)

niamh.brazil

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2021, 06:42:50 pm »
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To what extent does the exploration of human experience in Nineteen Eighty-Four invite you to reconsider your understanding of loneliness?

Composers create stories to effectively reveal both the personal and shared nature of human experiences and the qualities, motivations and emotions arising from these experiences. George Orwell's 1949 dystopian novel 1984 is a didactic warning against totalitarian dictatorship, making his audience aware of the extreme loneliness that can be inflicted upon individuals when the key human values of individuality and freedom are taken away from us.

Good response! A couple of points below:

  • Deals with the question very effectively, and clearly sets up essay to deal with loneliness explicitly
  • Good interpretation of purpose in Orwell's work
  • The first sentence is very general and doesn't tell the marker much about what your essay will be about. Don't feel the need to "warm up" to the thesis of your essay. Be specific in naming "qualities, motivations and emotions" rather than just listing the terms
  • Very clear expression - just remember to lay out the roadmap of your paragraphs in your intro

niamh.brazil

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2021, 06:49:57 pm »
+2
If possible, can you please check this thesis? Thank you so much :)
Practice thesis: To What Extent Does the Exploration of Human Experiences in 1984 Invite you to Reconsider your Understanding of Loneliness?
Individuals desire fulfilling relationships so, when they are subjugated and therefore isolated, they will search for basic liberties through connections, rebelling against the loneliness of a totalitarian world, however, the need to escape loneliness is inevitably overridden by fear of the authority.


  • Very strong exploration of the question by unpacking how it plays out across the whole text
  • Minor grammar correction that my make thesis bolded in quoted text here
  • Break up your ideas into succinct sentences - this thesis can probably be broken in 2 sentences at least
  • Ensure that you link those ideas back to the text when you introduce it in the rest of the introduction
  • This thesis works well despite not using explicitly rubric terms as you have used specific language to denote which experiences, qualities and emotions you are discussing in the essay - so don't feel the need to add extra wordiness by including these terms
« Last Edit: October 01, 2021, 07:04:51 pm by niamh.brazil »

niamh.brazil

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Re: September Text Analysis Lecture - 1984
« Reply #14 on: October 01, 2021, 07:02:20 pm »
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The dynamic between society and the individual has been epitomised (word choice? e.g. expressed, summarised, articulated) as 'solitude is impracticable and society fatal' (Waldo, 1870). George Orwell's dystopian fiction '1984' (1949) invites the reader to reconsider their perspective of loneliness as inherently negative through exploration of the individual's paradoxical reliance on yet conflict with society. Through Winston, Orwell conveys that despite the non-conformist's desire for intimate connection with both others and the self, the manipulation and subversion of this longing can be employed to obliterate individual autonomy, identity, and relationship. Thus, the text effectively serves as a cautionary tale regarding the dangerous implications of a controlling, totalitarian society, awakening its audience to the complexity and fragility of human experience.

  • Use of a quote for the first sentence is very relevant to the question and a good way to enhance your personal voice!
  • The interpretation of Orwell's purpose in the final two sentences is very compelling, engages well with the question and sets up the rest of the essay well
  • There is a small loose end in the middle of your intro where you ay that Orwell reconsiders loneliness "as inherently negative". This argument is reflected in the rest of your intro and also would be difficult to argue in light of the actual text. Maybe refine this a little to bring in line with the rest of your intro and the make the paradox you indicate a bit more clear
  • Ensure you signpost your paragraphs clearly
  • Otherwise this is a pretty excellent intro!