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July 29, 2021, 01:42:42 pm

Author Topic: COVID-19 and Education  (Read 49311 times)  Share 

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1729

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #180 on: July 07, 2020, 06:00:14 pm »
+6
I'm mostly satisfied with this response. I'm aware of the difference in danger/risk of COVID-19 among children compared to adults but I still find it weird that we can't gather in groups of three outside school but then spend hours each day in one room with over 20 people.  :)
To be honest, I'm just happy that we aren't being sent home again, online SACs would have been an absolute nightmare.
Yeah, the response was alright, but when they lifted restrictions last term, I was actually nervous that they were easing restrictions so fast, it's almost like the government wants a second wave (which they now got) At the same time I also understand the burden of the economic stagnation. But look, now the outcome is worst than what it would've been if they kept the restrictions, now the second wave has hit. A trend that I hope is only an anomaly.

« Last Edit: July 07, 2020, 06:02:01 pm by 1729 »

Stormbreaker-X

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #181 on: July 07, 2020, 06:24:36 pm »
+4
Update for Victoria
- Year 11/12 in metropolitan Melbourne + Mitchell Shire + Specialist Schools will go back to school as normal for term 3. I believe this also includes year 10 and below for their specific VCE subject if they are undertaking any.
- Prep to year 10 have their school holidays extended by 1 week in order for public health officials to gain more data to make a decision (remote learning is a possibility).

Thoughts on this?
Wow those year 9 and under are so lucky. My year 9 or under self would be so happy with this. I really hate going into lockdown tho, it sucks. Someone please help me I can't cope with this anymore :(
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Lear

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #182 on: July 07, 2020, 07:10:02 pm »
+18
Wow those year 9 and under are so lucky. My year 9 or under self would be so happy with this. I really hate going into lockdown tho, it sucks. Someone please help me I can't cope with this anymore :(

While you may receive some great support over forums, it would be best to make use of an actual professional who can go into specifics of the difficulties you are facing and provide you with help. It may be difficult to access in-person help so a good start would be one of the below. These are free and confidential.

Kids helpline (1800 55 1800)

Beyond blue (1300 22 4636)

Headspace (1800 650 890)

Almost everyone reading this will be at some level affected by the current pandemic. We could all use someone to talk to whether it be a friend you trust or someone from the above who is trained. Please look out for each other and especially yourselves during this time physically, socially, and mentally.
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whys

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #183 on: July 07, 2020, 09:04:00 pm »
+6
Thoughts on this?
Not much, to be completely honest. We had this coming for us, and there's nothing else we can do except contain the spread before it becomes too late and we end up like the US or the UK (which we definitely do not want). It's great they're still giving VCE students the opportunity to attend school in-person though, hopefully it stays that way and the number of new cases each day declines after these lockdown measures. I'm glad they are issuing a lockdown now, though. Hopefully, the spread of the virus diminishes!
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ArtyDreams

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #184 on: July 07, 2020, 09:37:42 pm »
+6
Thoughts on this?

Def a fair call - I for one was quite worried when restrictions started being eased.

Would be so great if this can get suppressed after this lockdown. Also, fair call for the VCE students. If I remember correctly he said something about keeping a fair ground between Regional and Metro Vic so I think it was a good idea.

However, I'm still quite worried about the prospect of returning to school - social distancing did not happen at all last time so I hope that a small attempt is made this time around to social distance a little bit!

Anyway, overall, happy with the decisions  :D (for now - hopefully we wont have to go back to online learning! Would be nice to finish this year off properly.)

Stormbreaker-X

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #185 on: July 07, 2020, 11:45:12 pm »
+2
While you may receive some great support over forums, it would be best to make use of an actual professional who can go into specifics of the difficulties you are facing and provide you with help. It may be difficult to access in-person help so a good start would be one of the below. These are free and confidential.

Kids helpline (1800 55 1800)

Beyond blue (1300 22 4636)

Headspace (1800 650 890)

Almost everyone reading this will be at some level affected by the current pandemic. We could all use someone to talk to whether it be a friend you trust or someone from the above who is trained. Please look out for each other and especially yourselves during this time physically, socially, and mentally.
Thanks mate.
-Replying to you all, I gotta agree that the lockdowns are there. Even tho it means my life will be different again, we definitely do not want to end up like other nations. Honestly I think we are the only state to have this much cases, some states don't has a case for months now.
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J_Rho

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #186 on: July 08, 2020, 09:27:38 am »
+10
At this stage, I honestly wouldn't be complaining if we went back to online learning. If we have to go back into full lockdown to get COVID under control then I'm all for it, I'd rather that so that we can get back to 'normal' sooner.
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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #187 on: July 08, 2020, 12:08:25 pm »
+5
i agree with you J_Rho!

as much as it sucks to be in lockdown in our final years at school, if it means we can sooner go back to normal, i'm all for it!

i do appreciate that they are trying their best to maintain some structure for the year 11s and 12s, and its really great how swiftly action is being taken

also, as much as i'm looking forward to going outside normally, i'm more looking forward to a time when the palpable state of constant stress and tension subsides and it will feel normal to accidentally brush past someone on public transport or at the shops and not freak out  :(

fingers crossed the number of new cases go down soon

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #188 on: July 08, 2020, 01:40:44 pm »
+4
Otherwise, I think I'm a fan of the incoming restrictions? Idk, kinda hard to be a "fan", more like they just seem reasonable enough, I guess. There's not really much else they can do about it - I do hope people don't complain as much to Daniel Andrews about "how we should be allowed out" now that they know what happens if he does let people out prematurely and they don't follow social distancing 😏

I don't think people sufficiently factor in the influence of luck in how things go when numbers are small.  Yes, mistakes were made here (in hotel quarantine most obviously), and the blame game has started on Victorian compliance generally, but I don't believe that Victoria are somehow 100 times worse at following the guidelines than everyone else, or that we eased restrictions prematurely when other states didn't (my memory is that in mid-May I thought we were in a better position than NSW, and they were easing restrictions faster than us).

The simple reality is that if the numbers are low, most people can break the guidelines most of the time and get away with it because they don't happen to come into contact with someone who has it.  And for me in the Eastern suburbs it is probably still that way - there is a fair chance that I could break all the rules and still not come into contact with anyone having the disease, and thus not catch it (no, I'm not recommending breaking rules - just saying that a "personal responsibility" narrative doesn't take into account differences between individuals and states that have more to do with luck than culpability.  Just because we want someone to blame doesn't mean the blame is actually fair).

So long as we keep the current "suppression rather than elimination" policy (which we kind of have to do) I'd be amazed if places like Sydney and Brisbane don't have spikes at some point in the next year when one or more things go wrong and a few cases slip under the radar for too long.  And how big those spikes become depends on how well state authorities do test and trace after detecting it and how well people in the state are following guidelines - but it will also depend a lot on luck.

Yeah, the response was alright, but when they lifted restrictions last term, I was actually nervous that they were easing restrictions so fast, it's almost like the government wants a second wave (which they now got) At the same time I also understand the burden of the economic stagnation. But look, now the outcome is worst than what it would've been if they kept the restrictions, now the second wave has hit. A trend that I hope is only an anomaly.

As above, my memory is that we eased restrictions slower than other states, and the easing of restrictions was data driven and proportionate to the number of cases we then had.  Just like this lockdown is data driven.

also, as much as i'm looking forward to going outside normally, i'm more looking forward to a time when the palpable state of constant stress and tension subsides and it will feel normal to accidentally brush past someone on public transport or at the shops and not freak out  :(

Yes, and this has always been the problem with the argument "If you just re-open the economy, things will be back to normal".  I suspect after a second lockdown we may be even more eager to get back to normal, but at the same time take longer to convince ourselves things are actually OK.  Which is why the National Cabinet was trying to avoid re-opening and then closing again, though the level of community transmission makes this a more serious problem than we've seen so far and needs action.

I'm mostly satisfied with this response. I'm aware of the difference in danger/risk of COVID-19 among children compared to adults but I still find it weird that we can't gather in groups of three outside school but then spend hours each day in one room with over 20 people.  :)
To be honest, I'm just happy that we aren't being sent home again, online SACs would have been an absolute nightmare.

The "children are safe, so don't close schools" (though young adults may be among the biggest spreaders) has always been an interesting argument, because there's such an age range in school-goers.  I was interested that yesterday Brett Sutton acknowledged that attendees in upper high school had more "adult-like" transmission patterns at the same time as agreeing for Year 11 and 12 to return to school.  Part of it was that they can get to school themselves and don't have parents mingling at drop-off etc., and part of it is of course that even if Year 12s are higher risk there are also considered to be more benefits from in-person learning for Year 12s.
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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #189 on: July 08, 2020, 04:21:02 pm »
+6
I don't think people sufficiently factor in the influence of luck in how things go when numbers are small.  Yes, mistakes were made here (in hotel quarantine most obviously), and the blame game has started on Victorian compliance generally, but I don't believe that Victoria are somehow 100 times worse at following the guidelines than everyone else, or that we eased restrictions prematurely when other states didn't (my memory is that in mid-May I thought we were in a better position than NSW, and they were easing restrictions faster than us).

The simple reality is that if the numbers are low, most people can break the guidelines most of the time and get away with it because they don't happen to come into contact with someone who has it.  And for me in the Eastern suburbs it is probably still that way - there is a fair chance that I could break all the rules and still not come into contact with anyone having the disease, and thus not catch it (no, I'm not recommending breaking rules - just saying that a "personal responsibility" narrative doesn't take into account differences between individuals and states that have more to do with luck than culpability.  Just because we want someone to blame doesn't mean the blame is actually fair).

So long as we keep the current "suppression rather than elimination" policy (which we kind of have to do) I'd be amazed if places like Sydney and Brisbane don't have spikes at some point in the next year when one or more things go wrong and a few cases slip under the radar for too long.  And how big those spikes become depends on how well state authorities do test and trace after detecting it and how well people in the state are following guidelines - but it will also depend a lot on luck.

As above, my memory is that we eased restrictions slower than other states, and the easing of restrictions was data driven and proportionate to the number of cases we then had.  Just like this lockdown is data driven.

Yes, and this has always been the problem with the argument "If you just re-open the economy, things will be back to normal".  I suspect after a second lockdown we may be even more eager to get back to normal, but at the same time take longer to convince ourselves things are actually OK.  Which is why the National Cabinet was trying to avoid re-opening and then closing again, though the level of community transmission makes this a more serious problem than we've seen so far and needs action.

The "children are safe, so don't close schools" (though young adults may be among the biggest spreaders) has always been an interesting argument, because there's such an age range in school-goers.  I was interested that yesterday Brett Sutton acknowledged that attendees in upper high school had more "adult-like" transmission patterns at the same time as agreeing for Year 11 and 12 to return to school.  Part of it was that they can get to school themselves and don't have parents mingling at drop-off etc., and part of it is of course that even if Year 12s are higher risk there are also considered to be more benefits from in-person learning for Year 12s.

Sorry - I didn't intend to imply that we DID stop restrictions early. If anything, Victoria has been one of the forerunners in stopping quickly and coming back slowly - Daniel Andrews was putting in restrictions back when Scott Morrison was saying there was nothing to worry about (was kinda funny when one day Andrews would say "we're going to have to ask people to work from home when able", and then the next Morrison was saying to continue business as normal). And as you say, when NSW were easing off, we were still going strong. You're right that it's partly luck based, but there IS something to be said that this likely happened because someone, somewhere, broke compliance - WHY they did it or WHO they are is neither here nor there. What's important is that we do something about it, which is happening.

As to my point on what happens if we let people out prematurely - if this happened DESPITE following proper protocol, imagine how much worse off we'd have been if we had come out of restrictions early. I just feel bad for Andrews - he's trying his best in a shit situation, things go wrong because of reasons entirely outside of his control, and everyone's complaining. And even before the spike, there were so many people complaining and telling him off. I just want less hate on my boy :'(

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #190 on: July 10, 2020, 09:06:19 pm »
+7
Is anyone else scared to go back to school? I'm not sure if I'm for going back to school again anymore... I really don't want to pass the virus onto any members of my family who are more at-risk than me if I do end up being an asymptomatic carrier. Is this just going to be an endless cycle of ramping up restrictions then relaxing them over and over until a suitable vaccine is developed? I'm seeing people who don't take social distancing seriously at all, and it really worries me. Is looking at the US and UK not enough of an incentive for the public to do their part in containing the spread of the virus?
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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #191 on: July 10, 2020, 09:54:17 pm »
+5
Is anyone else scared to go back to school? I'm not sure if I'm for going back to school again anymore... I really don't want to pass the virus onto any members of my family who are more at-risk than me if I do end up being an asymptomatic carrier. Is this just going to be an endless cycle of ramping up restrictions then relaxing them over and over until a suitable vaccine is developed? I'm seeing people who don't take social distancing seriously at all, and it really worries me. Is looking at the US and UK not enough of an incentive for the public to do their part in containing the spread of the virus?

Yes. Getting more terrified by the day actually - the cases are increasing like crazy.....

Not so much worried about myself getting it, but as you said, I'm horribly worried for my family members. Especially since I'll be the only one going out, I really dont want to bring anything home that could be avoided!

As much as I'd like to go back to school, I'm getting worried. I'm willingly to sacrifice a few learning weeks at school and work hard at home myself, if that means helping stop the spread of the virus and avoiding bringing anything home.


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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #192 on: July 12, 2020, 11:43:18 am »
+5
Most Victorian students will return to remote learning in term three, with those in years prep to 10.

It has been officially announced that we are returning back to remote learning (those in year prep - 10)

What do you think about this?

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #193 on: July 12, 2020, 12:52:13 pm »
+1
Most Victorian students will return to remote learning in term three, with those in years prep to 10.

It has been officially announced that we are returning back to remote learning (those in year prep - 10)

What do you think about this?

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Re: COVID-19 and Education
« Reply #194 on: July 12, 2020, 01:03:50 pm »
+2
Most Victorian students will return to remote learning in term three, with those in years prep to 10.

It has been officially announced that we are returning back to remote learning (those in year prep - 10)

What do you think about this?
kind of inevitable tbh given the vast majority of the students from prep-10 would need a parent taking them to and from school. Also the inherent increased difficulty of instilling social distancing with those that are younger.