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November 17, 2019, 10:47:49 am

Author Topic: Psychology help  (Read 472 times)  Share 

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yourfriendlyneighbourhoodghost

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Psychology help
« on: August 14, 2019, 02:44:28 pm »
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When picking out risk factors, protective, predisposing, precipitating and perpetuating, how would be the easiest and most accurate way to do this?
2018: Studio Arts [37]
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Studying hard to get an 80.00+ ATAR
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whys

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Re: Psychology help
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2019, 03:39:18 pm »
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Hi there! Just a heads up, but there's a psych question thread which you should use in the future, as more people will probably see your question and you'll get a faster reply. :D

I'm assuming you mean categorising different factors into these 4 categories. Firstly, we can start off by defining these 4 factors (I've included an example for clarification):

Predisposing - increases susceptibility to developing a mental disorder, e.g. family history of mental disorder
Precipitating - increases susceptibility to and contributes to the occurrence of a mental disorder, e.g. death of a pet
Perpetuating - inhibits recovery from a mental disorder and prolongs its occurrence, e.g. no social support system
Protective - prevents the occurrence or reoccurrence of a mental disorder, e.g. adequate amounts of sleep, resilience

Predisposing factors are basically any factors that can increase the risk of developing a mental disorder. This includes things such as genetic vulnerability. For example, someone with a twin sibling who has schizophrenia has a 50% likelihood of developing schizophrenia, compared to 2% for the general Australian population. This means they are at a higher risk.

Precipitating factors do the job predisposing factors do, but also contributes to the mental disorder's occurrence. This can be seen as the 'trigger(s)' for the mental disorder to occur. This can be things like loss of a significant relationship, maybe someone you know what involved in a car accident, stress or poor sleep.

Perpetuating factors basically stops you from getting better and also makes the disorder worse and go for a longer period of time. This can involve stigma, rumination, and not having a beneficial social support system.

Protective factors are self-explanatory.

I hope this answers your question!
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yourfriendlyneighbourhoodghost

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Re: Psychology help
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2019, 09:19:25 am »
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Hi there! Just a heads up, but there's a psych question thread which you should use in the future, as more people will probably see your question and you'll get a faster reply. :D

I'm assuming you mean categorising different factors into these 4 categories. Firstly, we can start off by defining these 4 factors (I've included an example for clarification):

Predisposing - increases susceptibility to developing a mental disorder, e.g. family history of mental disorder
Precipitating - increases susceptibility to and contributes to the occurrence of a mental disorder, e.g. death of a pet
Perpetuating - inhibits recovery from a mental disorder and prolongs its occurrence, e.g. no social support system
Protective - prevents the occurrence or reoccurrence of a mental disorder, e.g. adequate amounts of sleep, resilience

Predisposing factors are basically any factors that can increase the risk of developing a mental disorder. This includes things such as genetic vulnerability. For example, someone with a twin sibling who has schizophrenia has a 50% likelihood of developing schizophrenia, compared to 2% for the general Australian population. This means they are at a higher risk.

Precipitating factors do the job predisposing factors do, but also contributes to the mental disorder's occurrence. This can be seen as the 'trigger(s)' for the mental disorder to occur. This can be things like loss of a significant relationship, maybe someone you know what involved in a car accident, stress or poor sleep.

Perpetuating factors basically stops you from getting better and also makes the disorder worse and go for a longer period of time. This can involve stigma, rumination, and not having a beneficial social support system.

Protective factors are self-explanatory.

I hope this answers your question!

Yes, I understand thank you so very much. I will use the thread from now on.
2018: Studio Arts [37]
2019: English [43+ hopefully] Psychology [48+ hopefully] Vis Com [48+ hopefully] Software Development [43+ hopefully] Further Maths [37+ hopefully]

Studying hard to get an 80.00+ ATAR
Melbourne Uni Bachelor of Arts (Psych Major) ❤️