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August 21, 2019, 06:12:50 am

Author Topic: COSI ESSAY PLEASE SOMEONE READ AND GIVE ADVICE  (Read 72 times)  Share 

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Jfernando312

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COSI ESSAY PLEASE SOMEONE READ AND GIVE ADVICE
« on: July 16, 2019, 12:06:33 pm »
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Explore how Louis Nowra is able to control and shape the way an audience responds to his text, ‘Cosi’.


Cosi, by Louis Nowra, is a play that’s controlled and shaped by Nowra to shed light on the underlying meaning of  Cosi which the author himself is attempting to convey. Louis Nowra’s most longing experiences with his grandparents are mirrored onto Lewis to assist Nowra in controlling and shaping the way his responders react to Cosi. Similarly, it is through the contextual understanding of the play Cosi, Nowra is given the opportunity to control the audience's understanding of the contemporary perceptions of the society in the 1970s, hoping to shape the perspective of the audience. Alternatively, the development of Nick is a major catalyst in shedding light to discrimination of the patients, thus he controls and shapes the way the audience perceives both the ostracised patients and the outsiders. All these aspects have enabled Nowra in controlling and shaping the way his responders interact and react to Cosi's underlying meaning.

Louis Nowra’s most longing experiences with his grandparents has left a vivid print in his young mind where these evocative memories are then mirrored onto Lewis to control and shape the way responders react to Cosi. Similar to how Nowra, a pot maker has to pummel and knead a ball of clay and make it undergoes a series of stages until it finally reaches the stage where it is appreciated and valued by the viewers and buyers. Nowra uses mirrors his experiences to Lewis to control the way his audience react to his play Cosi. By reflecting Nowra's evocative memories of his grandparents, he is able to shed light on brutal treatments of the outside world, thus controlling the way his audience react to mentally ill in the contemporary society of the 1970s. Nowra’s direct views on the mentally ill are made evident through Lewis’ dialogue where he states, “But she is still my grandma”. Lewis’ pitiful tone towards mentally ill is made evident in the adjective ‘still’, where he expresses that, although her grandma is mentally unstable she ‘still’ possess characters of her old self or of a ‘grandma’. Similarly the distressing tone present in the adverb ‘but’ challenges society's connotations such as ‘mad’ and ‘insane’, by justifying the fact that although his ‘grandma’ is mentally unstable she is ‘still’ his ‘grandma’. Nowra has excellently embodied his experiences using Lewis to generate sympathy towards the mentally ill to form an interconnection where the audience aspire to treat the mentally ill with care and equality. Nowra's intentions are exactly similar to a pot maker who controls the speed of the pottery wheel along with the texture of the clay mix. A pot maker kneads the clay until it feels bendy and when the texture is acceptable he begins to press the clay mix with palms using the weight of his own body. Nowra’s connection with a pot maker has made it effortless to understand the way in which Nowra controls his way his audience reason to Cosi. Nowra mirrors his young evocative experiences of his grandparents to Lewis and then he changes his responders perception of the mentally ill by emotionally moving responders to a sympathetic stage, thus shaping the way audience respond to the contemporary issues in Cosi. 

Through the contextual understanding of the play Cosi, Nowra is provided with an opportunity to control the audience's understanding of the contemporary perceptions of the society in the 1970s, hoping to shape the perspective of the audience. Context acts as a marked area of land, where certain borderlines are present for Nowra to express his views, within those set limits. The use of these borderlines in this marked land area leaves Nowra to act within his limits to further reflect the society's views on the mentally ill, thus helps him shapes the way his audience react to these brutal treatments. The context of the contemporary 1970s provides the audience a foundation that assist them in comprehending the society's barbaric behavior and treatment towards the mentally ill patient. In a pottery wheel, the outline or the edge of the circular wheel acts as a borderline where the pot maker is only allowed to carve and knead the clay within the outline of the wheel. For instance, Justin’s emotive tone present in, “the experiment is over” reiterates the cruel treatment of the public. The word “experiment” in context links back to lab rats being tested, when Justin refers to the mental patients as an “experiment” it dehumanises them and detaches them from society. Nowra has excellent performs his act within the borderlines of the context by controlling the characterisation of Justin. Nowra has constructed Justin’s dialogue in a way that contrasts with his personality and moral values. By allocating the dialogue, “the experiment is over”, Justin’s values are directly contrasted to emphasise the sort of emotions ostracised patients feel when they are confronted with such criticism. When Justin directs this dialogue at Lewis, both Lewis along with the audience feel a sense of guilt for using connotations such as ‘mad’ and ‘insane’ to address mentally ill. By allowing the audience to feel a sense of guilt, Nowra successfully controls the way audience respond to the barbaric treatment of the society, thus assist the responders in reflecting on their own behaviour towards the ostracised. By defining the word “experiment” contextually, Nowra shows the responders how the contemporary society of 1970 dehumanises the mentally ill patient due to their mental instability. Nowra conveys the idea of how the society continues to ostracise the patients and dehumanise them due to their incapabilities, thus the emotive tone present in defining the word “experiment” in context provides a foundation in which the audience can comprehend the brutal behavior of the society.

Nowra has developed outsiders such as Nick to act as major catalysts in shedding light onto societal matters such as discrimination to control and shape the way the audience perceives both the ostracised patients and the outsiders. Nowra is able to give an insight to how the contemporary society in the 1970s perceived the mentally ill, to assist Nowra to shape his audiences’ views, to sympathise and connect with the marginalised patients. Nowra controls the views of the audience from the very moment his audience is introduced into the views of the ‘real’ world. This rejectful tone created by Nick assists Nowra to then shape the way his audience view both parties. The audience begins to sympathise with the mentally ill patients and grow emotions such as hate and detest towards the contemporary society of the 1970s’. By introducing Nick and thoroughly inspecting his behavior through the course of the play, allows Nowra to both control and shape his audience's understanding of the Cosi as they begin to generate emotions such as hate towards society and pity towards ostracised individuals. Nick’s denouncing prejudice along with unpolished attitudes towards the patients reflects the ignorance 1970s society has towards the patients. Nicks prejudice towards the mentally ill patients is depicted in the song, ‘They are coming to take me away’. The song alludes to Napoleon XIV’s song, that views mentally ill as contagious and somewhat frightening. Nowra alludes to this song to reflect Nick’s attitudes towards the mentally ill. By incorporating a song dehumanises mentally ill, Nowra mould an emotional perspective to view those who are mentally ill. The use of emotive tone present in the song’s underlying meaning aids the audience in developing a sympathetic view towards the patients as the society has ostracised and mock people who are mentally unstable. By moving the viewers into an emotional state Nowra controls the ways audience perceive both worlds. Furthermore, by encouraging his viewers to re-evaluate the way in which they respond to the prejudices in their own communities, Nowra shapes the way responders react to Cosi’s underlying meaning.

In summary, Cosi’s author Louis Nowra has successfully controlled and shaped the way in which the audience interact and respond to Cosi. Louis Nowra’s most longing experiences with his grandparents are mirrored onto Lewis to control and shape the way responders react to Cosi. Similarly, it is through the contextual understanding of the play Cosi, Nowra is provided with an opportunity to control the audience's understanding of the contemporary perceptions of the society in the 1970s, hoping to shape the perspective of the audience. Furthermore, the development of characters such as Nick acts as a major catalyst in shedding light to discrimination of the patients, thus Nowra controls and shapes the way his audience perceive both the ostrasiced patients and the outsiders.