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December 07, 2019, 07:31:50 am

Author Topic: (QUESTION) Quotations in an English (ADV.) Essay  (Read 182 times)

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claudia007

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(QUESTION) Quotations in an English (ADV.) Essay
« on: July 12, 2019, 12:23:15 pm »
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This is just a quick question on quotes in an essay. Obviously we need quotes in an essay to provide evidence, enhance our argument etc etc but when we are integrating the quotes do we need to write who said it and where in the text it was (if so, exact placing or general?)?
To be more specific with what I am doing --> I am studying The Tempest and Hagseed and am preparing some quotes so I can learn them for my essays, if I wanted to do a practice question, I'm just struggling to know if I should include who said it or not (and where it is in the text) because usually you'd just put a quote to 'back up' an argument based on a theme but is saying the 'character' necessary? (bit of a jumbled Q, let me know if what I'm asking doesn't make sense)
« Last Edit: July 12, 2019, 12:33:22 pm by claudia007 »

owidjaja

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Re: (QUESTION) Quotations in an English (ADV.) Essay
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2019, 12:59:42 pm »
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This is just a quick question on quotes in an essay. Obviously we need quotes in an essay to provide evidence, enhance our argument etc etc but when we are integrating the quotes do we need to write who said it and where in the text it was (if so, exact placing or general?)?
To be more specific with what I am doing --> I am studying The Tempest and Hagseed and am preparing some quotes so I can learn them for my essays, if I wanted to do a practice question, I'm just struggling to know if I should include who said it or not (and where it is in the text) because usually you'd just put a quote to 'back up' an argument based on a theme but is saying the 'character' necessary? (bit of a jumbled Q, let me know if what I'm asking doesn't make sense)
Hey there,

Welcome to the forums!

When it comes to integrating quotes, I personally think it's important to include who's saying the quote. This is because you should be including a bit of context around the quote so your marker knows that you're not just quoting something out of context and also sees how the plot can enhance the meaning of the theme. Keep in mind, textual context doesn't need to be more than one sentence! It should indicate which part of the plot you're referring to. Also, I wanted to add that characters are important to the text as well because they're acting as the composer's voice (i.e. they're the ones conveying these themes).

So for example, when I did The Tempest, an example of me integrating textual context is: "Miranda's journey of discovery centres around her curiosity towards their situation on the island. Her journey begins when she exclaims O I have suffered with those that I saw suffer, enabling the storm to become a catalyst for her journey, as well as suggesting the confronting nature of discovery." Notice how I've given small snippets of textual context by referring to their situation on the island and the storm, and included Miranda's name when I quoted.

Hope this helps!
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claudia007

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Re: (QUESTION) Quotations in an English (ADV.) Essay
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2019, 02:10:09 pm »
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Hey there,

Welcome to the forums!

When it comes to integrating quotes, I personally think it's important to include who's saying the quote. This is because you should be including a bit of context around the quote so your marker knows that you're not just quoting something out of context and also sees how the plot can enhance the meaning of the theme. Keep in mind, textual context doesn't need to be more than one sentence! It should indicate which part of the plot you're referring to. Also, I wanted to add that characters are important to the text as well because they're acting as the composer's voice (i.e. they're the ones conveying these themes).

So for example, when I did The Tempest, an example of me integrating textual context is: "Miranda's journey of discovery centres around her curiosity towards their situation on the island. Her journey begins when she exclaims O I have suffered with those that I saw suffer, enabling the storm to become a catalyst for her journey, as well as suggesting the confronting nature of discovery." Notice how I've given small snippets of textual context by referring to their situation on the island and the storm, and included Miranda's name when I quoted.

Hope this helps!

Thank you so much!! This definitely helps:))