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May 22, 2019, 10:45:21 pm

Author Topic: How much of the textbook is actually necessary?  (Read 123 times)  Share 

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JR_StudyEd

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How much of the textbook is actually necessary?
« on: May 07, 2019, 02:24:16 am »
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Is it true that a significant portion of what is written in the Cambridge Methods Textbook is completely irrelevant to the exam or even internal assessments? I have no time to even complete half of what we go over in class, given that our teacher goes over every. single. exercise. With that being said, what parts are important and which parts can I skip?
VCE Class of 2019
Subjects: English, Psychology (2018), Maths Methods, Chemistry, Biology, Health and Human Development

AlphaZero

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Re: How much of the textbook is actually necessary?
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2019, 08:07:27 am »
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Is it true that a significant portion of what is written in the Cambridge Methods Textbook is completely irrelevant to the exam or even internal assessments?

No, pretty much everything in the Cambridge Textbook is relevant.

I have no time to even complete half of what we go over in class, given that our teacher goes over every. single. exercise.

Doing every question set by your teacher is a useless task. Do exercise questions until you are confident that you sufficiently understand the concept(s) taught in that exercise. Then, attempt a few past exam questions so you can learn how you will be tested in those concepts.

You should note that a good chunk of the questions in the textbook aren't similar to what you would see on an exam. As the name suggests, they are exercise questions - they are to help you understand the concepts. Exam questions are what will test your level of understanding.

With that being said, what parts are important and which parts can I skip?

Skipping anything is not a great idea at all.
2015\(-\)2017:  VCE
2018\(-\)2021:  Bachelor of Biomedicine and Concurrent Diploma in Mathematical Sciences, University of Melbourne