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October 30, 2020, 02:49:54 am

Author Topic: QCE English Questions Thread  (Read 6780 times)

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jasmine24

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #45 on: September 13, 2020, 11:21:33 am »
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Hi, i'm doing the analytical essay under exam conditions in a couple days and i'm a bit confused as to what I would need to include in my essay (e.g. focus on analyzing quotes etc.). If anyone had any suggestions, that would be amazing!
Thank you :)

XD12345

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #46 on: October 07, 2020, 07:56:33 pm »
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Hi everyone

I have my external exam for English coming up and I have a question regarding my exam.

Of course we are all familiar with the basic essay structure

Introduction

Body

Conclusion

The body contains your 3/4 main points/arguments to prove my thesis on the topic/novel etc
Iíve been thinking, to truly prove my point and to assist my thesis, would it be a good idea to write a little counterargument that goes against my own thesis and then proving it wrong? My essay would look something like this:

Introduction
Argument 1
Argument 2
Argument 3
Counter-argument followed by me proving it wrong or discrediting  the argument using evidence.
Conclusion

I know this is something you may do for an essay for legal studies or history, but I think that it could really help bring my points across and it could also show the examiner that I have a deeper understanding of the novel, if that makes sense.

So basically, this is my question,
Would it be ok/better to write an argument that goes against my own thesis in an analytical essay if I discredit it and prove it wrong?


The book the exam is on is Burial Rites by the way :)

literally lauren

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #47 on: October 08, 2020, 09:39:07 am »
+3
Hi everyone

I have my external exam for English coming up and I have a question regarding my exam.

Of course we are all familiar with the basic essay structure

Introduction

Body

Conclusion

The body contains your 3/4 main points/arguments to prove my thesis on the topic/novel etc
Iíve been thinking, to truly prove my point and to assist my thesis, would it be a good idea to write a little counterargument that goes against my own thesis and then proving it wrong? My essay would look something like this:

Introduction
Argument 1
Argument 2
Argument 3
Counter-argument followed by me proving it wrong or discrediting  the argument using evidence.
Conclusion

I know this is something you may do for an essay for legal studies or history, but I think that it could really help bring my points across and it could also show the examiner that I have a deeper understanding of the novel, if that makes sense.

So basically, this is my question,
Would it be ok/better to write an argument that goes against my own thesis in an analytical essay if I discredit it and prove it wrong?


The book the exam is on is Burial Rites by the way :)

Okay, you definitely can have a 'counter-argument' or 'challenge' paragraph. Some teachers are big fans of this! But I'll explain how to do this in a smart way to ensure you're not undermining your own argument!

Basically, you don't want to have one argument that completely destroys all of your others, like:

THESIS: Agnes is an innocent victim.
PARAGRAPH 1: Agnes is mistreated in childhood and this warps her worldview.
PARAGRAPH 2: Agnes is taken advantage of by others and cannot stand up for herself.
PARAGRAPH 3: Agnes only commits murder because of the circumstances others put her in.
COUNTER-ARGUMENT: But Agnes is actually evil and mean; she killed Natan out of jealousy and her only regret was that she didn't seem as sweet or innocent as Sigga so she could get away with it!!
CONCLUSION: but... yeah... Agnes is still mostly an innocent victim...

This makes it really hard to transition back to your conclusion to end your essay on a high note. You also don't want your 'challenge' to turn into a paragraph full of examples that disprove your point, as this isn't really an effective argument.

Instead, the job of this counter-argument paragraph should be to argue that "it's complicated!" For example:

THESIS: Toti has a positive influence on Agnes.
PARAGRAPH 1: Toti shows a desire to look beyond rumours and prejudices, which Agnes appreciates.
PARAGRAPH 2: Toti earns Agnes' trust and the two bond while he offers Agnes companionship.
PARAGRAPH 3: Agnes sharing her story with Toti is an important and cathartic experience for her and helps her to process the reality of her situation.
COUNTER-ARGUMENT: However, Toti is also a reminder of the empathy and kindness Agnes didn't receive in life, and he is unable to achieve justice for her. All he can do is offer her solace and promise to be by her side when she is executed.
CONCLUSION: Therefore, although Toti's positive impact on Agnes was limited by their circumstances, Hannah Kent ultimately shows how compassion and a desire to understand another person's story can have a profound impact even when that person is close to dying.

Now, we have a more sophisticated conclusion that takes into account this 'complication.' This counter-argument paragraph isn't saying "here's a bunch of stuff that proves me wrong" - it's saying "here are things that make this not entirely 100% true." And that's a really useful way to show that you understand the complexity of the text!

Then, your conclusion comes in swinging with a sentence like 'Although it's complicated, ultimately here's my main argument/thesis' which lets you end powerfully!

I hope that makes sense - if you want to try this out with a prompt we can discuss some possible counter-arguments here! Burial Rites is a great text for discussing complex psychology and character motivations, so you'll have a lot of opportunities for interesting challenges :D

XD12345

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #48 on: October 08, 2020, 01:17:27 pm »
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This helped a lot and provided some insight for me. Thank you :)

josephinewarda

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #49 on: October 15, 2020, 10:44:10 am »
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Hi, I'm starting Unit 3 and we have to do a persuasive speech for the UN Youth Delegates on an issue from 2020. I have chosen to do FGM. Any specific tips or general advice?

literally lauren

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #50 on: October 17, 2020, 09:06:21 am »
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Hi, I'm starting Unit 3 and we have to do a persuasive speech for the UN Youth Delegates on an issue from 2020. I have chosen to do FGM. Any specific tips or general advice?
Hi Josephine! :)

That's certainly a relevant issue for the context of a UN delegation, and there'll be lots of opportunities for powerful, emotional moments. I'l separate my advice into five different tips:

1. The first very important step would be to do lots of research and make sure you understand the topic well. Find reliable and reputable sources like the WHO, groups like End FGM, or documentaries like this (I haven't watched the whole thing but this looks informative!).

2. For your assessment task, you should make sure you find an argument that isn't too overly simplistic like 'FGM is bad and we should stop it.' Most people would completely agree with this, but it doesn't let you construct interesting ideas/sub-arguments. That's not to say you should take a deliberately controversial approach and argue the opposite, but rather, start from a simple idea and make it more nuanced.
For instance, you might want to look at the cultural history behind this practice in order to argue that the UN must work with groups who understand the cultures and communities involved in order to end FGM.

3. When writing the speech, try to focus on two separate parts of the discussion: 1) What is the problem and why is it so bad? and 2) What is the solution and why is it so good?  You don't want to spend so much time talking about the issue and all of its horrible consequences that you forget to drive your audience towards a course of action. But you also don't want to spent too much time talking about possible solutions without explaining to your audience why the issue needs to be addressed. It doesn't have to be 50/50, but just make sure you're thinking about both the problem and a proposed solution while writing. 
For your argument/solution, don't feel you need to 'solve' the issue (that's an awful lot of pressure for a Year 12 student, and your teacher won't expect you to fix everything!). Rather, find a rational solution and explain how this could be implemented . You're marked on how persuasive you are, so just concentrate on persuading your audience that your point of view is important and your solution would lead to the best possible outcome.

4. Make sure you strike the right tone. For some speeches, using humour or colloquial language can help the audience feel at ease and make them more likely to agree with your arguments. But for a serious issue like FGM, it would be pretty weird to use jokes or similarly light-hearted persuasive techniques! Instead, you'll have lots of opportunities to tell emotional stories, so think about what kinds of feelings you want to evoke in your audience. Should they be outraged? Disgusted? Horrified? Depressed? It would be relatively easy to make them feel sad, or to feel pity for victims of FGM, but I'd recommend trying to elicit emotions like anger towards a socio-political system that allows FGM practices to continue. That way, you're directing your audience to the root of the problem, not just its consequences.

5. Finally, consider how you will construct your 'persona' (i.e. pretending you're a youth delegate speaker at the UN). Where is your persona from? What's their backstory? Why do they care about the issue? This should be something you weave throughout the speech - don't just introduce yourself at the beginning and forget your backstory/context/audience. A good starting point might be to find a real journalist or activist and model your persona around them, or you could make up your own story based on your research.

Best of luck! If you have any other questions about your speech feel free to drop them below :)

jasmine24

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #51 on: October 29, 2020, 06:43:16 am »
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Hi, I was wondering what kind of techniques I could use in my persuasive speech so it's not just informative?
thank you!