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August 04, 2020, 03:11:36 pm

Author Topic: QCE English Questions Thread  (Read 5411 times)

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s110820

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #30 on: May 01, 2020, 05:04:03 pm »
+4
Hi Jasmine,

I just finished editing your essay. I have attached it to this forum message.

Thanks and kind regards,

Darcy Dillon.
2020 QCE: Biology, English, General Mathematics, Literature and Modern History.

Inspirational Quote: "Flowers grow back, even after they're stepped on. So will I"

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jasmine383

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #31 on: May 01, 2020, 06:54:41 pm »
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Hey,  I understand you have your own work too and I really appreciate you helping out even though you're in grade 12 too! Thank you so much  :)
Jasmine

s110820

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #32 on: May 13, 2020, 11:49:48 am »
+1
Hi, QCE English community!

I was just wondering if anyone is interested in doing an English study group for our External exam this year? I'm doing Shakespeare's Hamlet if anyone is interested, but I am more than happy to help with any of the other texts if needed :)

If you're interested, please message me via the ATAR Notes private messages or through my email [email protected]! I'm thinking that we could do it via Zoom, but if anyone has any other ideas, I would be more than happy to implement those instead.

Thank you so much and have a great week,

Darcy Dillon.
2020 QCE: Biology, English, General Mathematics, Literature and Modern History.

Inspirational Quote: "Flowers grow back, even after they're stepped on. So will I"

Come and Find Me:
Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/user/celestial-

jasmine24

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #33 on: July 06, 2020, 08:49:09 am »
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Hi, I'm currently attempting to write a creative piece relating to Australian identity with probably a focus on a feminist perspective. However, any idea I have seems too simple/surface level and was wondering if anyone has tips on how to avoid this without making it too ?philosophical? so there is a clear narrative structure.
Thanks!

literally lauren

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #34 on: July 08, 2020, 09:03:58 am »
+5
Hi, I'm currently attempting to write a creative piece relating to Australian identity with probably a focus on a feminist perspective. However, any idea I have seems too simple/surface level and was wondering if anyone has tips on how to avoid this without making it too ?philosophical? so there is a clear narrative structure.
Thanks!

Hi Jasmine!

Sounds like a cool theme for a piece! Do you know what kind of story you want to write about (e.g. a woman living alone in rural Australia; snapshots of the experiences of Australian mothers from different walks of life; a conversation between two female friends about their contrasting experiences, etc.) It'd also be good to pick a genre (e.g. short story/POV narrative, non-fiction, news article, podcast interview, etc.) just to give yourself a starting point.

Striking a balance between being 'too philosophical' and 'not deep enough' can be tricky, but it mostly comes down to the message you want to get across. It doesn't have to be a profound, never-before-seen insight into humanity... but it also can't be something incredibly basic like 'oppression = bad' :P Once you've got a rough outline of the subject matter for your piece, think about what you want the 'moral' of your story to be... what kinds of themes do you want to explore, and what do you want to say about them? From there, you can start constructing details in your piece so you can portray characters and choose plot points that suit your ideas.

Hope that helps get you started, but if you need more help, let us know! :)

Sammy1234331

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #35 on: July 08, 2020, 03:10:41 pm »
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 Hey my name is Samuel and Iím pretty bad at English essayís ( C-Ďs)  and Iím hoping for some advice/study habits and tools I could use to improve this. Iím currently studying the novel 1984 by Gorge Orwell and canít seem to get around The novel or the concepts. This essay is under exam conditions and requires a lengthy response which as of now Iíd fail. I have a lot of time to prepare  Iíd really appreciate if you could help me. Thanks!

literally lauren

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #36 on: July 08, 2020, 05:27:40 pm »
+6
Hey Samuel, you've come to the right place! :)

A C- average is actually pretty damn good for English, so don't be discouraged! Typically that means you've got a handle on the basics, and you just need to refine your knowledge to get up to that B/A territory. The most useful thing you can do know is work out what sorts of things are holding you back. Chatting to your teacher about your essays or any areas you're struggling with is a good place to start.

As for 1984 (let's set aside the exam conditions for now): if you feel like you don't have a good grip on the story (i.e. what happens in the plot, who the characters are, and why they do things) then I'd recommend looking up some summary resources online. You'll find a tonne of stuff for 1984, so just schedule some chill study time to watch a bunch of YouTube videos or read some crash course guides. (You can also check out the ATAR Notes book if you prefer a physical resource; you can view a preview of the first few pages, including a condensed summary here).

From there, you can start working on 'the concepts' and what the themes and messages of the book are. This is also something analytical resources can help with, but a good starting point would be making a list of as many key concepts as you can think of (e.g. surveillance, loyalty, freedom, etc.) and then ask yourself 'what is Orwell saying about _____?' For instance, what is Orwell saying about loyalty? Well, based on how the Party corrupts Winston's loyalty towards Julia, perhaps Orwell is suggesting that loyalty cannot prevail over the need for self-preservation. This then builds up your understanding of the overall novel, making it much easier to eventually write essays that have strong arguments.

As for the exam conditions, don't stress about that for now! As you've said, you have plenty of time to prepare, so focus on delving into the text now and do as much reading/research as you can. Don't expect yourself to be able to handle an exam now before you've spent enough time on the content - that'd be like just starting a new topic in Maths or Science and then being given a test on everything the very next day!

Typically the scariest thing about 'exam conditions' in English is not knowing what the prompt will be (and how the hell do you prepare for something when you don't know what the question is??) so essentially you want to start getting a broad understanding of the text asap. Again, coming up with a really big list of themes is super beneficial, because it means you'll probably cover most if not all possible key words that will be on your exam. Once you've got that list of, let's say, 20 themes, you can start grouping them together (e.g. putting 'surveillance' 'privacy' 'independence' and 'government oversight' in the same category) and write a practice essay about those ideas. Eventually you'll have talked about so many different ideas that you'll have the skillset to handle anything for your assessment task, even if it's not one of the exact words you've covered.

I hope that helps; best of luck with 1984! It's an amazing book to analyse so I hope you have fun with it!!

jasmine24

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #37 on: July 15, 2020, 06:50:58 pm »
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Would someone be able to read my creative piece by around Wednesday if I completed it by Saturday? I'm just super worried since we don't receive any teacher feedback! :)

Nikita_Leota

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #38 on: July 21, 2020, 06:08:41 pm »
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Has anyone started looking into the Themes of Macbeth. I was wondering if there were any opinions on how Shakespear decided to represent women in this play, and how he decided to imply Macbeth's corruption. Can any one give some insight?

s110820

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #39 on: July 21, 2020, 06:33:36 pm »
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Has anyone started looking into the Themes of Macbeth. I was wondering if there were any opinions on how Shakespear decided to represent women in this play, and how he decided to imply Macbeth's corruption. Can any one give some insight?

Hi Nikita,

I think one of the most important aspects of analysing Shakespearian texts such as Macbeth is to consider the historical context, especially when you are deconstructing the main themes of the play. To give you a hint, since Shakespeare wrote Macbeth in/around (date is an estimate) 1606, it can be assumed that the play is set/written in the Jacobean era. Now, that you know what era you are learning about, I think that it would be extremely useful for you to do some research around the values, attitudes, roles and assumptions of women throughout the Jacobean era.

In terms of Macbeth's corruption, I would assume that the main causes of the corruption throughout the play are linked to the Divine Right of King and the disruption of the Natural Order as the King (usually at the top of the Natural Order/Great Chain of Being) was murdered (an unnatural death) by someone in a lower rank than him. Also, please note that corruption is motivated by greed and deception, which should give you the "foundation" of an essay if you are required to answer an essay question based on this theme.

Hopefully, this helps. If not, please let me know as I would be more than happy to clarify anything if needed or if you have any questions, queries or concerns about Shakespeare or Macbeth.

Have a great week and kind regards,

Darcy Dillon.
2020 QCE: Biology, English, General Mathematics, Literature and Modern History.

Inspirational Quote: "Flowers grow back, even after they're stepped on. So will I"

Come and Find Me:
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Bri MT

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #40 on: July 21, 2020, 07:48:38 pm »
+1
Has anyone started looking into the Themes of Macbeth. I was wondering if there were any opinions on how Shakespear decided to represent women in this play, and how he decided to imply Macbeth's corruption. Can any one give some insight?

There isn't so much discussion around corruption here but you might find this Macbeth textual analysis thread useful. Are you more interested in how themes of corruption and women interact in the text or in them separately?

jasmine24

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Re: QCE English Questions Thread
« Reply #41 on: July 24, 2020, 08:24:36 pm »
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Does anyone have any tips on editing a short story? :)