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November 18, 2019, 12:03:02 pm

Author Topic: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!  (Read 1581 times)  Share 

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Balfe

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Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« on: January 07, 2019, 06:28:05 pm »
+10
Hello ATARNotes Members and Guests,
I hope you're all having a wonderful start to your year and can get some use out of the post that follows!

Last year, in 2018, I was fortunate enough to achieve a Raw 50 study score for Psychology 3/4 (without completing 1/2) and am very grateful to this community for providing help and advice to both myself and others throughout the entire year. I'd like to now give back to the community and try to help anyone here looking for any tips, practice solutions, advice, etc.

Topics could range anywhere from how to approach the 10 marker in the exam, through to the research methods poster, study time commitments for psychology, general background advice and help for certain questions/topics/areas of study and frankly anything else you can think of!

I'm also open to answering any other general enquiries you have in regards to studying for any 3/4s (not only Psychology) - or indeed 1/2s!

P.S. I'm also selling my notes (67 pages, 21.5k words and arranged under VCAA dotpoints - Including U4AOS3 Research Methods) via VCE DiscussionSpace on Facebook (where I'm a moderator - the one with Balfe in the name - just shoot me a message or friend request ), or you can simply send me a message on here for samples/prices/more details. https://www.facebook.com/groups/VCEDS/permalink/2142219892509645/  :)

I've also attached a picture of my results, as well as the 2014 and 2015 VCAA Exams with irrelevant questions in regards to the new study design crossed out to assist in your studies this year.

Thanks and Good Luck for the Year,
Balfe  :D :D



This Ask Me Anything will occur on the 21st of January 2019 - make sure you've registered an account by then so that you can participate :)
« Last Edit: January 21, 2019, 09:13:22 am by Balfe »
2017-Present: Admin @ VCE DiscussionSpace on Facebook
2018: Psychology [50]
2019: English Language, Legal Studies, Economics, French, Mathematical Methods
2020: Law - Commerce @ Monash or Melbourne

Bri MT

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2019, 09:29:20 am »
0
This Ask Me Anything is now open!

Thanks again Balfe for volunteering to do this; I'm sure many students will benefit from your advice :)
2018-2021: Science Advanced - Global Challenges (Honours) @ Monash

Leadership  ; Scientific Methodology ; Wanting to stay productive?

Want QCE help? Leave a post here :)

Tatlidil

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2019, 09:52:22 am »
0
YES! First question!
Ok so this year I'm also going to do psych 3/4 without doing 1/2, how do I approach psych? Is it about memorisation?
Goal:
2019 - Specialist [50], Physics [50]
ATAR: 99+

Balfe

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2019, 10:00:49 am »
+4
YES! First question!
Ok so this year I'm also going to do psych 3/4 without doing 1/2, how do I approach psych? Is it about memorisation?

Hey Tatlidil,
Much like you I completed Psychology 3/4 without the 1/2 and can assure you that you won't be disadvantaged in any way whatsoever. In fact, I believe the only small content overlap is in U3AOS1 about the nervous system and you'll go over this small part of the course again anyway! Psychology is also a strange subject in terms of approach as it requires scientific and analytical reasoning. Rote learning content will help you with definitions, but the majority of the psych exam and your SACs will be application. Constantly in psychology you will be given scenarios and asked to relate the information you know to the scenario - a mark is usually dedicated to this overall and so, say the question is about Kate, if you don't explicitly mention Kate or her actions in your answer you couldn't get full marks. I'd recommend looking at the VCAA past exams here to get a feel for the question types: https://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vce/studies/psychology/exams.aspx
Other than that, I would recommend brushing up on research methods before you begin if you haven't done much science before - such as Independent/Dependent variables, but I also imagine this will be taught to you. Overall, understanding > memorisation.
Hope this clears it up for you!
2017-Present: Admin @ VCE DiscussionSpace on Facebook
2018: Psychology [50]
2019: English Language, Legal Studies, Economics, French, Mathematical Methods
2020: Law - Commerce @ Monash or Melbourne

Tatlidil

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2019, 10:07:38 am »
0
Hey Tatlidil,
Much like you I completed Psychology 3/4 without the 1/2 and can assure you that you won't be disadvantaged in any way whatsoever. In fact, I believe the only small content overlap is in U3AOS1 about the nervous system and you'll go over this small part of the course again anyway! Psychology is also a strange subject in terms of approach as it requires scientific and analytical reasoning. Rote learning content will help you with definitions, but the majority of the psych exam and your SACs will be an application. Constantly in psychology you will be given scenarios and asked to relate the information you know to the scenario - a mark is usually dedicated to this overall and so, say the question is about Kate if you don't explicitly mention Kate or her actions in your answer you couldn't get full marks. I'd recommend looking at the VCAA past exams here to get a feel for the question types: https://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vce/studies/psychology/exams.aspx
Other than that, I would recommend brushing up on research methods before you begin if you haven't done much science before - such as Independent/Dependent variables, but I also imagine this will be taught to you. Overall, understanding > memorisation.
Hope this clears it up for you!
Alright! Makes sense, thanks for the help!
Goal:
2019 - Specialist [50], Physics [50]
ATAR: 99+

lst1103

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2019, 10:51:11 am »
0
Hi!
How many hours per day/week did you dedicate to Psych?
What are your best generic tips for success in the subject?

ash1198

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2019, 11:01:18 am »
0
Hey, thanks for setting up this Q&A!

1.) What do you think is the most beneficial approach to answering short-answer VS multiple-choice questions?
2.) How much time do you think should be delegated to psychology in order to achieve a 40+ (i.e. is it more or less time demanding than other subjects?)
3.) What topics traditionally do you think deserve the most attention when it comes to studying for psych? (Or rather, what topics were most difficult for you?)

Thanks in advance!
2018: Philosophy [38]
2019: English, Mathematical Methods, Chemistry, Psychology and [?]

Balfe

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2019, 11:09:42 am »
+5
Hi!
How many hours per day/week did you dedicate to Psych?
What are your best generic tips for success in the subject?

Hey lst1103,

I would say that my approximate study plan was around an hour for Psychology each night, but of course, this would vary depending on SAC times, etc and so it could've been anywhere from 0mins-2hours each night. I personally enjoyed staying around 1-2 weeks ahead of the class, so that in class time the information was solely revision and building upon my knowledge, so my homework was largely dedicated to watching Edrolo and taking my notes. A helpful thing we also did at my school was a 'quiz' every Monday on the past week's content. This meant that we had continual incentive to revise and I would spend around 1.5hrs on the weekend ensuring that I was up to date and had my notes memorised.

Generic tips I can recommend would be:
  • Do Checkpoints early! I cannot stress enough the 'strange' way of writing Psychology answers to get full marks and so you should start learning this as early in the year as possible.
  • Stay ahead! It's easier said than done I know, but if you consistently operate a week or so ahead, even small setbacks will still leave you ahead of the pack
  • Help others! VCE sets us up to feel 'in competition' with everyone else and sure, we are! But, teaching others is one of the best ways of learning and it's also not worth destroying others for your own success
  • Use your teacher! I've just had a look back at my emails back and forth with my teacher and I had around 75 of them from throughout the year. Obviously, try to find answers online before you disturb them at 1am, but equally, they are a valuable resource to show practice exams/questions to and they'll be glad to help you. You can even email or speak to other teachers of the subject, even if they aren't your main teacher to ensure you're covering all ends of the spectrum
  • Save entire past exams until a month or so before the exam - personal opinion here a bit, so take it with a grain of salt
  • Use absolutely EVERY resource available to you, no matter how small! (Checkpoints, ATARNotes, company exams, VCAA exams, small worksheets). Psychology is all about application and so practice really does may perfect.
  • Ask questions! Continually (within reason  :) ) !
2017-Present: Admin @ VCE DiscussionSpace on Facebook
2018: Psychology [50]
2019: English Language, Legal Studies, Economics, French, Mathematical Methods
2020: Law - Commerce @ Monash or Melbourne

Balfe

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2019, 11:23:57 am »
+6
Hey, thanks for setting up this Q&A!

1.) What do you think is the most beneficial approach to answering short-answer VS multiple-choice questions?
2.) How much time do you think should be delegated to psychology in order to achieve a 40+ (i.e. is it more or less time demanding than other subjects?)
3.) What topics traditionally do you think deserve the most attention when it comes to studying for psych? (Or rather, what topics were most difficult for you?)

Thanks in advance!

1) The best approach for multiple-choice is to expose yourself to a wide variety of past questions. This will ensure that you know not only the content you should be studying, but also have a firm grasp on the types of scenarios that you may encounter and how to effectively apply this knowledge. Some people say to save multiple choice questions until the end of an exam, but simply, this is wrong - They provide a valuable set of retrieval cues (as you will lean about in U3AOS2 Memory and Learning) that will get you ready for the short answer questions coming!
Then, for SA, depending on the question it may be necessary to plan it out/dotpoint it/write a full paragraph, it's really just what works best for you and doesn't place you under too much time pressure. For example, (I know this may be less relevant as you haven't learnt it yet) when answering a message about neural transmission, I would make a step-by-step guide of sorts and when it came to Learning processes questions I would put information under sub-headings relevant to the stages of learning. Don't overthink the question as I did many times throughout the year for multiple choice, but also don't go for an answer that seems overly simple, make sure to check the others too!

2) To achieve a study score of 40+ means being in the top 9% of the state and, of course, this will take consistency and determination, but it can be done with enough effort! In regards to other studies, there is a lot of content to learn, but much of it doesn't need to be memorised and instead application is the main aspect of the course, which makes preparation for SACs and the final exam that little bit easier than some other rote learnt subjects. You should spend around an hour each night, but we can't all do this and I would really just recommend making sure that you are on top of everything and ready for upcoming assessments (for all subjects this is true). Weekends - you should allow some time to tidy your notes and memorise them. If there's a SAC coming up, do practice questions consistently each night for around 2 weeks leading up to the SAC so you are confident in all areas when you finally get there.

3) Research methods is definitely a topic that tends to 'slip under the radar' and become ignored by many students, which is very worrying as it guides the inner-wokings of the entire psychological investigation. Thus, ensure you have a steady grip on all the information covered here. Other difficult topics might include The differentiation between Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases (this is such a large concept and yet it still hasn't been examined so watch out for this one - I was actually expecting this to be one of the largest parts of the 2018 exam, but it barely made an appearance). Moreover, the reconstructive nature of memory can be a difficult point to understand and the questions are also noticeably vague. Then knowing all the risk/protective factors for mental health would also be a necessary consideration - there are quite a few of them, but you should know them all in reasonable detail.
2017-Present: Admin @ VCE DiscussionSpace on Facebook
2018: Psychology [50]
2019: English Language, Legal Studies, Economics, French, Mathematical Methods
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lyristis

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2019, 11:39:09 am »
0
hi, and grats on the score!

1) What was your exam strategy? Did you do a certain section first, or was it just whichever ones you were most confident in?

2) How, and how long before, did you study for the exam?

3) What would you attribute your success to?

4) What would you say is necessary to scoring a 40+? And 45+?

5) Any regrets in regards to how you approached the subject?

6) Tips for the 10 marker?

7) If you don't mind, what were your SAC and exam scores?

Thanks!

AbyssFenix

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2019, 11:53:36 am »
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What rank were you?
2018: Biology [:(]
2019: English, Mathematical Methods, French, Economics, Legal Studies

Hallows

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2019, 12:08:13 pm »
0
Hi, thanks so much for this quick q&a!  :D :D :D

 I'm gonna be a yr 11 this year, accelarating in psych 3/4. I was wondering what time allocations I should have for psych as well as my other 1/2s in order to maximise my potential to get a 40+ study score for pscyh, whilst also spending enough time to keep up with my 1/2s in order to build a foundation for myself for next year?

Balfe

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2019, 12:09:31 pm »
+5
hi, and grats on the score!

1) What was your exam strategy? Did you do a certain section first, or was it just whichever ones you were most confident in?

2) How, and how long before, did you study for the exam?

3) What would you attribute your success to?

4) What would you say is necessary to scoring a 40+? And 45+?

5) Any regrets in regards to how you approached the subject?

6) Tips for the 10 marker?

7) If you don't mind, what were your SAC and exam scores?

Thanks!
Thanks Lyristis!

1) My exam strategy was rather simply really - front to back! I think this is almost certainly the best method and would recommend you use it. By doing the multiple choice questions first you prime you brain with cues for information that may be useful in later sections. Technically, as you will learn this year, MC also uses the measure of retention called recognition, which is generally regarded as easier than SA, especially considering the exact right answer is there for you. If you approach a difficult question and spend a minute or so on it without any progress, skip it, but remember to come back! Personally in the 2018 exam Q1 stated that we could use a diagram and I decided that I was better off to come back and do this later, but ultimately forgot - so don't do that - not sure if I lost a mark for it in the end. Then, after you've covered all the other sections move into the Extended response and try to use some of the information you would've already referenced throughout the exam to make this easier for you.
Reading time: straight to the extended response - rough plan in your head if it seems slightly difficult. Then read the SA repeatedly. I personally wasn't planning on even looking at multiple choice during the reading time - and I didn't! I'm sure as the year progresses, you will discover what works best for you.

2) As I only had this one 3/4 my exam preparation started around 2 months before the exam if I recall correctly, or almost instantly after the final SAC. I began in the first week memorising all of my notes as a baseline. Then, I would've done checkpoints (but I'd already completed these during the year) and so I went straight into company exams. I would generally do one section each night (MC or SA) and I did maybe 5 extended responses separately when I could be bothered (which to be honest, probably wasn't enough of the time!). Ensure you save 4-5 VCAA exams/company exams to complete entirely under the 3 hour time on a weekend - preferably at the same time as your final exam will be to prepare you for it.

3) I think what really allowed me to go well in the subject was always working ahead of the class, so that I couldn't really ever fall behind and so the class times to me were times solely for revision and for tips Orr key pointers from my teacher. And on that note, teachers, use your teacher. I asked heaps of questions throughout the year to ensure I was on the right track and made sure to tailor my SAC responses to suit what I knew my teacher would want. It takes dedication, but a high score is certainly achievable.

4) A stated in (3). Working ahead, using teachers, planning out your study and simply working hard and trying to resist the urge to sit down and relax when you feel you cannot go any longer. Setting attainable goals, such as by the use of checklist/todo list is helpful! Also necessary to note is that you are working towards VCAA and so responses all year should tailor to what they are expecting from you to gain top marks.

5) My main regret would be not truely delving into why I lost certain marks on questions. I always gathered a superficial understanding, but never really noted it down or placed it into a word document somewhere to ensure it truly stuck in my mind.

6) Do not focus all of your attention here. It may seem like a large section, but it's really only 10/120 marks, less than 10%! If you have a reasonable structure and can make some clear points you will guarantee a 5/10 and then it is really just extending yourself by providing examples and clear analysis, rather than superficial statements to reach the higher mark boundaries. I actually only got a 4 I think on my first practice one and progressively improved until I could consistently obtain 8-9.5s. Not sure if I ever got a 10!

7) For Unit 3 I got 96/100 with a median of 76 at my school and 100/100 for Unit 4. I didn't get my statement of marks just yet and so don't know how I went on the exam in terms of marks, but I'd be more than happy to let you know once I receive it. An important thing to also note is not to be discouraged by a bad SAC mark. I was actually very disappointed with my first SAC, being new to the subject and style of writing and I let it set me back slightly, lowering my goals from 45+ to 40s, but really, one bad SAC won't make a difference - it's the exam that counts!

7)
2017-Present: Admin @ VCE DiscussionSpace on Facebook
2018: Psychology [50]
2019: English Language, Legal Studies, Economics, French, Mathematical Methods
2020: Law - Commerce @ Monash or Melbourne

Balfe

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2019, 12:10:32 pm »
+2
What rank were you?

Hey AbyssFenix, I was actually Rank 2 at my school, and Rank 1 actually ended up only getting the 3rd top score at my school. It just goes to show that the exam can really make or break you.
2017-Present: Admin @ VCE DiscussionSpace on Facebook
2018: Psychology [50]
2019: English Language, Legal Studies, Economics, French, Mathematical Methods
2020: Law - Commerce @ Monash or Melbourne

Balfe

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Re: Raw 50 in Psych (2018) - Ask Me Anything!
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2019, 12:15:40 pm »
+1
Hi, thanks so much for this quick q&a!  :D :D :D

 I'm gonna be a yr 11 this year, accelarating in psych 3/4. I was wondering what time allocations I should have for psych as well as my other 1/2s in order to maximise my potential to get a 40+ study score for pscyh, whilst also spending enough time to keep up with my 1/2s in order to build a foundation for myself for next year?
I completed the same program as you like this and so I would recommend simply looking at my earlier answers to time allocation. It is true that you should ensure the 3/4 doesnít completely overule your 1/2s, but also by the same token it is more important and 1/2 teachers generally understand lateness, etc due to 3/4 work. The results of 1/2 will also never really appear as you only receive an S (pass) or an N so donít be discouraged by a bad mark due to putting more time into your 3/4.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2019, 12:24:26 pm by Balfe »
2017-Present: Admin @ VCE DiscussionSpace on Facebook
2018: Psychology [50]
2019: English Language, Legal Studies, Economics, French, Mathematical Methods
2020: Law - Commerce @ Monash or Melbourne