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April 26, 2019, 12:15:59 am

Author Topic: Maths Methods (Exam 2): Discussion, Questions & Potential Solutions  (Read 13655 times)

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AlphaZero

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Re: Maths Methods (Exam 2): Discussion, Questions & Potential Solutions
« Reply #240 on: November 11, 2018, 07:28:06 pm »
+2
Wait....crap. If a person used the triangle method do you think all 3 marks would be taken off?

Unfortunately, I think so. It's not a viable method, and you don't get the correct answer.
2015\(-\)2017:  VCE
2018\(-\)2021:  Bachelor of Biomedicine and Concurrent Diploma in Mathematical Sciences, University of Melbourne


Sine

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Re: Maths Methods (Exam 2): Discussion, Questions & Potential Solutions
« Reply #241 on: November 11, 2018, 07:49:09 pm »
0
Wait....crap. If a person used the triangle method do you think all 3 marks would be taken off?
unlikely that you actually lose all 3 marks since assessors normally don't like to give out 0/3 when a student has actually written something down. If you have covered some methods concept in your working out you may be able to get 1/3.

JamesMaths

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Re: Maths Methods (Exam 2): Discussion, Questions & Potential Solutions
« Reply #242 on: November 15, 2018, 11:12:14 pm »
0
Here is my solution to the Mathematical Methods Exam 2 Paper
(Part 1).

PDF on my web site:
https://unimelb.academia.edu/JamesCui

Provide Tutorials in Mathematical Methods and Specialist Mathematics in Balwyn.

Regards

James.
Gold Medal Winner, Mathematics Competition 1979, Jinan City.
Bronze Medal Winner, Mathematics Competition 1979, Shandong Province.
BSc in Mathematics, Master in Biostatistics, PhD in Statistics.
Senior Research Fellow, University of Melbourne, Monash University.
Associate Professor in Biostatistics.
Director, Advance Mathematics Learning Centre.

Among the 43 students who received the Melbourne Chancellor's Scholarship in 2018, two are my students in Maths Methods and Specialist Maths class.

In 2018, the highest VCE Specialist Maths scores are: 54, 52.99, 52, 50.59, 50, 49.88.

JamesMaths

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Re: Maths Methods (Exam 2): Discussion, Questions & Potential Solutions
« Reply #243 on: November 15, 2018, 11:14:30 pm »
0
Here is my solution to the Mathematical Methods Exam 2 Paper
(Part 2).

PDF on my web site:
https://unimelb.academia.edu/JamesCui

Provide Tutorials in Mathematical Methods and Specialist Mathematics in Balwyn.

Regards

James.
Gold Medal Winner, Mathematics Competition 1979, Jinan City.
Bronze Medal Winner, Mathematics Competition 1979, Shandong Province.
BSc in Mathematics, Master in Biostatistics, PhD in Statistics.
Senior Research Fellow, University of Melbourne, Monash University.
Associate Professor in Biostatistics.
Director, Advance Mathematics Learning Centre.

Among the 43 students who received the Melbourne Chancellor's Scholarship in 2018, two are my students in Maths Methods and Specialist Maths class.

In 2018, the highest VCE Specialist Maths scores are: 54, 52.99, 52, 50.59, 50, 49.88.

JamesMaths

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Re: Maths Methods (Exam 2): Discussion, Questions & Potential Solutions
« Reply #244 on: November 15, 2018, 11:16:02 pm »
+1
Here is my solution to the Mathematical Methods Exam 2 Paper
(Part 3).

PDF on my web site:
https://unimelb.academia.edu/JamesCui

Provide Tutorials in Mathematical Methods and Specialist Mathematics in Balwyn.

Regards

James.
Gold Medal Winner, Mathematics Competition 1979, Jinan City.
Bronze Medal Winner, Mathematics Competition 1979, Shandong Province.
BSc in Mathematics, Master in Biostatistics, PhD in Statistics.
Senior Research Fellow, University of Melbourne, Monash University.
Associate Professor in Biostatistics.
Director, Advance Mathematics Learning Centre.

Among the 43 students who received the Melbourne Chancellor's Scholarship in 2018, two are my students in Maths Methods and Specialist Maths class.

In 2018, the highest VCE Specialist Maths scores are: 54, 52.99, 52, 50.59, 50, 49.88.


Sine

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Re: Maths Methods (Exam 2): Discussion, Questions & Potential Solutions
« Reply #246 on: February 12, 2019, 05:41:02 pm »
0

mn123

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Re: Maths Methods (Exam 2): Discussion, Questions & Potential Solutions
« Reply #247 on: February 12, 2019, 05:47:03 pm »
0
interesting that exam 1 8b only 3% got full marks on and the final question only 4%
what % did you think would get full marks on 8b and 9d?

Sine

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Re: Maths Methods (Exam 2): Discussion, Questions & Potential Solutions
« Reply #248 on: February 12, 2019, 05:52:39 pm »
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what % did you think would get full marks on 8b and 9d?
didn't really think of it at the time but historically exam tends not to be that difficult. Usually the most difficult question is still answered correctly by ~10% of the cohort.

S_R_K

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Re: Maths Methods (Exam 2): Discussion, Questions & Potential Solutions
« Reply #249 on: February 12, 2019, 06:23:46 pm »
0
interesting that exam 1 8b only 3% got full marks on and the final question only 4%

Re, 8b, there are a few things on there that a very large proportion of the cohort would have overlooked or not applied under exam pressure.

1: Realising that e^(4x) > 0 for all x, hence the initial equation can be divided through by e^(4x) without losing solutions.
2: Getting a discriminant of 4 and being confused about how there could be only one solution with a positive discriminant.
3: Not realising that the second solution is discarded when division by zero occurs (rather than the square-rooting of a negative, which is a more common experience for students).

Most of these are subtleties that are more commonly addressed in Specialist. Of course one would expect students doing both subjects to have performed better on this question; but unfortunately often students compartmentalise their knowledge / skills, and don't apply relevant knowledge / skills across contexts.