Login | Register

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

August 07, 2020, 02:27:17 am

Author Topic: A turtle's exploration of the world of science & leadership  (Read 10025 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

K888

  • VIC MVP - 2017
  • National Moderator
  • ATAR Notes Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3432
  • Respect: +2574
Re: A turtle's exploration of the world of science & leadership
« Reply #45 on: November 27, 2019, 10:13:26 pm »
+5
Re: letters for building names at Peninsula - yep, should have said it's easy once you know which building is which haha. Which doesn't take long because there's not many buildings. Before you learn of each building it is definitely confusing lol

Congrats on all the things you've achieved this year, Bri. It sounds like its been a massive year for you and I'm excited to hear about your adventures next year. Your ability to multitask a lot of responsibilities has made me reconsider my abilities and wonder about challenging myself a bit more!
2017-2020: Bachelor of Physiotherapy (Honours)

Bri MT

  • VIC MVP - 2018
  • Administrator
  • ATAR Notes Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3838
  • invest in wellbeing so it can invest in you
  • Respect: +2852
Re: A turtle's exploration of the world of science & leadership
« Reply #46 on: November 28, 2019, 08:44:55 am »
+2
Re: letters for building names at Peninsula - yep, should have said it's easy once you know which building is which haha. Which doesn't take long because there's not many buildings. Before you learn of each building it is definitely confusing lol

Congrats on all the things you've achieved this year, Bri. It sounds like its been a massive year for you and I'm excited to hear about your adventures next year. Your ability to multitask a lot of responsibilities has made me reconsider my abilities and wonder about challenging myself a bit more!

Thank you!

I'm looking forward to seeing what you get up to next year too :)

Bri MT

  • VIC MVP - 2018
  • Administrator
  • ATAR Notes Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3838
  • invest in wellbeing so it can invest in you
  • Respect: +2852
Re: A turtle's exploration of the world of science & leadership
« Reply #47 on: March 13, 2020, 07:23:38 pm »
+11
Really quick update from me as I haven't posted in here for ages.


Had a pretty hectic summer and just finished Week 1 (since Monash removed o-week, pushed back semester start and made week 1 online due to coronavirus).

Atm I'm most keen for BIO3011  Research methods in biology, then ECC2-some-numbers-I-can't-remember Prosperity, poverty and sustainability (Also known as PPS), and then BIO3111 Applied ecology. I probably should feel more keen for applied ecology than I do right now and I'm guessing that'll build throughout semester but yeah...   Also, BIO3111 and BIO3011 are VERY easy to confuse when I'm reading an email, timetable etc. so maybe some of my enthusiasm for BIO3111 will be transferred through that :P

In mass^3 we did some rescheduling and replanning due to semester dates being thrown off by the coronavirus decisions but now have a timetable for the semester. We also did a working bee / mini renovation of the common room so hopefully it'll be a good welcoming space for the new advanced science students when they'll probably visit for the first time soon :D


Anyway, that's the speedy update done. I've been unwell recently but am better now and will scramble to catch up on things before returning for a more comprehensive update.



2020 has been a long 3 months; best of luck to everyone for whatever the next three throw at us.

Bri MT

  • VIC MVP - 2018
  • Administrator
  • ATAR Notes Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3838
  • invest in wellbeing so it can invest in you
  • Respect: +2852
Re: A turtle's exploration of the world of science & leadership
« Reply #48 on: April 16, 2020, 10:59:49 am »
+11
Heyo, update here

Ok so I've kept that order of which units are my favourites but after the first lecture applied ecology did get much better and I am learning valuable info in it. Had the first assessment for it due this week (which is mid sem break) which was pretty straightforward except for the incredibly restrictive wordcount.

On the same day as that was due I was trying to fix my settings for backing up files to OneDrive automatically which included temporarily losing 2 years of files from my laptop. Now I know how to avoid that but yeah... wasn't great. I was hoping that fixing that would fix an issue I've been having where RStudio hasn't been loading the tidyverse package. I've now invested many hours in trying to fix that googling solutions, changing pathways, uninstalling and reinstalling things etc. Still haven't fixed whatever the issue is.

On the plus side I can use the RStudio cloud version for my research methods assessment instead and I'm not having the same issue there so it's not like I'm going to lose marks on my assignment due to this. I've done all the coding work on my assessment and was able to copy this across, just need to do figure captions and written statements interpreting the data. I find saving on the cloud version to be unreliable so I am still going to keep trying to fix my issues with using the desktop version.

Prosperity poverty & sustainability hasn't had a big assessment yet but we do get marked on "discussion logs" on a Moodle forum where we collaborate in groups to make reading summaries & discuss the ideas from the readings etc. Marking is individual based on your contributions but I still think I'm lucky to have a pretty good group. There's 1 person who hasn't contributed much at all but that's a lot more manageable than if most of the group didn't engage.

I'm waiting out the shutdown at mum's place rather than in my sharehouse. I had been really liking being able to go on campus to study in the early days of semester but it's not exactly essential for me to study there so I haven't done that recently. Online learning is pretty ok for me so that's not a big issue. After doing eng lang in year 12 through DECV this is much easier than that ahaha. Kinda sucks not being as able to learn the practical skills in Applied Ecology from actually going into environments, identifying taxa, making transects and quadrats etc. but it's not like I'm doing any wet lab (what most people probably think of as a lab)  heavy units like chemistry.

The thing that's hardest for me in this situation is not the direct effects on me but how it's impacting others. In my course, the only time you can go on exchange is the 1st semester of 3rd year, so this year most people in my cohort had exchange planned. As you can imagine, those plans that were carefully made and constructed to fit within our course map have been disrupted with the need to return to Australia while they still could and as their host unis closed. I feel for the high school students and teachers who are adapting on the go with lots of uncertainty - particularly in the qce system where there's the added stress of it being the first year with external assessment. I've got a cousin going through year 12 VCE atm too and can see how this is influencing his learning. My heart especially breaks for people who are having their wellbeing seriously disrupted by this and/or don't feel comfortable and safe in their homes.

Bri MT

  • VIC MVP - 2018
  • Administrator
  • ATAR Notes Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3838
  • invest in wellbeing so it can invest in you
  • Respect: +2852
Re: A turtle's exploration of the world of science & leadership
« Reply #49 on: July 29, 2020, 11:14:03 am »
+15
Hey everyone,

about to start sem 2 and a lot has happened so here's an update!

I did fix the issue with tidyverse not loading (uninstalling and reinstalling some more fixed it up).

Those assignments went well, only lost 1 or 2 marks in the research methods one and got 100% on the discussion logs which was cool. In the end I didn't maintain my grades being that high and ended up with HDs for the bio units and distinction for PPS. All of those units would've benefited from me studying them in a time where I was better able to put time and energy into them but I thought they were all pretty well run regardless.

I'd be very surprised if research methods in bio isn't my favourite bio unit in terms of coursework at the end of my degree. A frustration I did have is that it was clear that the tutor marking my work for the last assignment didn't have much aptitude for code and didn't really understand mine - c'mon guys, a loop nested inside an if statement is not exactly that complex (esp for a week 12 assignment)... and when a (different tutor) marked my report some of their comments went against what I had been told by the lecturer or were otherwise objectively wrong. Some of their comments were completely valid but it still sucked and at the time I was too busy stressing about end of semester to chase up people whose emails I didn't have. Again, I can't complain too much as I did end up with a HD anyway and far more importantly I learnt a lot but it was still a bit upsetting to get those marks back in a unit where I'd had multiple students say they learnt more from me than the staff. I really believe in the unit and I'd still encourage people to take it, I could tell a lot of thought went into the design of the unit and the teaching staff very genuinely believed in what they were teaching, and I think the skills gained from it are very important etc.

I got off a bit on the wrong foot with applied ecology as it felt to me a lot like it was preparing students to go out and get a consulting job after uni (and that's not what I'm interested in, I don't really want to be getting my pay from developers etc... ). When I step back and look at the content it is things that if I'd seen in earlier units I would've loved, like how you decide which areas of land should be put in a reserve and the different algorithms used for this. In a different semester I think I would've really enjoyed this unit and it sucks that we missed out on the practical skills side of things. I would've liked to be able to pick a research problem and choose between data sets (like we could for research methods) for our report but I understand why that wasn't practical. It also would've been impossible for us to go and collect the data ourselves like in previous years. I clearly remember at the start of semester attending a lecture in person (- seeing the pieces of paper marking out where we were allowed to sit for distancing -) and the lecturer brightening when they saw they actually had an audience. To me that almost represents the whole unit, they tried what they could for it being online but this is a unit that really struggled with that.

Prosperity, poverty, and sustainability was an interesting unit. This was my first non-science unit in my degree but in the end when talking about things like climate change it was a pretty big bonus to already be pretty exposed to topics surrounding that, how anthropogenic climate change works etc. It was weird to be on the other side of economics saying "Look at me! I'm a science! See look, I use data!" and felt like a role-reversal of when I'd been the only psych student in my physics class. The difference of course being that psych is a science and economics (as far as I can tell) is not (evidence based decision making doesn't have to be scientific in nature??? why fight so hard for something that doesn't truly fit?? you don't need to be science to be worthy of respect??). There were videos posted up for each topic rather than lectures which I thought worked well and the peer-marking system was great (lots of feedback since you have multiple people marking your work) but on the other hand having tutes/workshops be videos + forum rather than real-time didn't seem to work. It's very hard to have a conversation rather than comment-and-never-look-back when people are on at a whole range of different times. I would've preferred tutes to be ran like the help sessions with students then going into discussion together after the content (which could be recorded and posted as a video) so that we could actually discuss.


In semester 2 I'll be studying trends in ecology, indigenous studies, macroeconomics, and impact through science 3b. I have more to say but this is long already so I'll leave it here for now :)

hums_student

  • MOTM: SEP 18
  • Forum Obsessive
  • ***
  • Posts: 363
  • Respect: +492
Re: A turtle's exploration of the world of science & leadership
« Reply #50 on: July 29, 2020, 03:59:48 pm »
+2
The difference of course being that psych is a science and economics (as far as I can tell) is not (evidence based decision making doesn't have to be scientific in nature??? why fight so hard for something that doesn't truly fit??
I will not hesitate to fight you.

How did you find Tidyverse, by the way? Would you say it's necessary for learning and using R properly? We didn't learn Tidyverse for my R subject but we had to use ggplot2, which I think is included in Tidyverse.

I'm doing macro in sem 2 as well, interested to hear how you find it. :)
VCE: Literature, History, Politics, Chinese, Methods, Chemistry (98.35 ATAR)
UNI: Bachelor of Arts (Economics / Pols & Int'l History)

Bri MT

  • VIC MVP - 2018
  • Administrator
  • ATAR Notes Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3838
  • invest in wellbeing so it can invest in you
  • Respect: +2852
Re: A turtle's exploration of the world of science & leadership
« Reply #51 on: July 29, 2020, 04:36:57 pm »
+4
I will not hesitate to fight you.

How did you find Tidyverse, by the way? Would you say it's necessary for learning and using R properly? We didn't learn Tidyverse for my R subject but we had to use ggplot2, which I think is included in Tidyverse.

I'm doing macro in sem 2 as well, interested to hear how you find it. :)

Uh oh.

If you present a stronger argument than using data & evidence -> science, then I'm happy to listen.


I don't think you need tidyverse but I really like it and found it very useful. Hopefully you agree that ggplot2() is great. I never want to make an excel graph again. I also liked doing a lot of data manipulation work using tidyverse. I really like piping, which allows you to take the result of one line of code and make it an argument of a function in the next line without binding it to anything.

example

e.g. first code chunk is get the rivertrawls tibble and group the rows together with the same subcategory. Then filter each of these groups so only the 1st row in each group is kept. Then show the subcategory of each the remaining rows, ordering them by their subcategory. (In the end you're left only with 1 row for each subcategory displayed in alphabetical order).   


I've downloaded some satellite data of the ocean (showing cholophyll concentrations) to learn how to analyse this but the stuff for that seems to be more old style R. I'm hoping that after I get comfortable with it I'll be able to translate it across into being compatible with a more tidyverse way of doing things.

I'll try to keep updated more often! I think macro will be good (otherwise I wouldn't be taking it since it's an elective) - hopefully that turns out to be the case for both of us :)
« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 10:37:16 am by Bri MT »

hums_student

  • MOTM: SEP 18
  • Forum Obsessive
  • ***
  • Posts: 363
  • Respect: +492
Re: A turtle's exploration of the world of science & leadership
« Reply #52 on: July 30, 2020, 08:32:25 am »
+3
If you present a stronger argument than using data & evidence -> science, then I'm happy to listen.
my very scientific reasoning
maths + assignments with right/wrong answers = science. fight me.
Tidyverse looks really neat! Yeah ggplot2 is great, way superior to excel. We used Stargazer which also gives some nice looking tables when doing regression analysis, but tidyverse looks more versatile.

All the best with sem 2! :)
VCE: Literature, History, Politics, Chinese, Methods, Chemistry (98.35 ATAR)
UNI: Bachelor of Arts (Economics / Pols & Int'l History)

Bri MT

  • VIC MVP - 2018
  • Administrator
  • ATAR Notes Legend
  • *****
  • Posts: 3838
  • invest in wellbeing so it can invest in you
  • Respect: +2852
Re: A turtle's exploration of the world of science & leadership
« Reply #53 on: August 05, 2020, 11:32:18 am »
+4
my very scientific reasoning
maths + assignments with right/wrong answers = science. fight me.
Tidyverse looks really neat! Yeah ggplot2 is great, way superior to excel. We used Stargazer which also gives some nice looking tables when doing regression analysis, but tidyverse looks more versatile.

All the best with sem 2! :)

I haven't used Stargazer before. We're always told for out reports to format our tables using what we've generated from R but not copying it. I'll have to check it out at some point.

Good luck to you for sem 2 as well! :)





I haven't had classes for all of my subjects yet but here we go:

Monday: I had classes from 8am - 1pm with no break (trends in ecology 1 hour lecture followed by a 4 hour impact through science workshop which also clashed with a macroeconomics lecture. My TuteSmart year 10 maths class is also on Monday so a busy day for me to be sure.

Trends in ecology: I think I'm going to really like this unit. When I was doing the readings I wasn't quite sure how relevant they would be but I'm glad I did them as it gave more depth and context to the lecture without being one of those cases where the lecture just rehashes the readings anyway. Essentially we were talking about how when you look at a species you can find rules for it and predict outcomes because it's not that complex, when you look at a huge scale you get general trends which can be fairly easily understood, but when you look at the middle it's a complex mess of detail and interaction that's exceptionally hard to find rules for. In fact, it's looking increasingly like a lot of what ends up happening with communities (which species are dominant etc. ) is mostly random. I've got another lecture for this in about an hour, which iirc is focused on how people are trying to understand communities and also quickly looking at Charles Darwin (& how the person with such a huge contribution to ecology wasn't really an ecologist).

Impact through science 3b: It was so good to see the other people in my cohort again :). This unit is also the first time we've had Jake who is basically an assistant lecture that was in the first cohort of global challenges to graduate. The actual class content could've been useful condensed a bit more but thankfully we did get small breaks during the class which allowed us to quickly grab food etc. Very importantly, we found out what our projects are, what partners we are working with and who is in our team (this class is kind of a mini-honours). My team is 4 people (only 1 of whom I've worked with before in-class and that was only for 1 assignment) and we're working on improving how citizen science (i.e. non-scientists helping science through things like data collection) is used for the Marine Mammal Foundation. Half of the team has worked with MMF before, our main point of contact is with an ex-GC-er who I've done a speech with before (& so briefly met), and our majors collectively are in chemistry, ecology & conservation biology, and zoology. We've got a team meeting today and have organised a meeting with the MMF team for later in the week, we've been doing a bit of research and thinking to pick apart the context we're working with & I'm keen to have the meeting. This project works really well with my interests in marine biology, science engagement in the broader community, and data analysis for biology so I'm sure this is going to be a fantastic experience.

Indigenous science So. much. reading. Partially because I went ahead and did a bunch of extra reading for the general section on the reading list rather than just our week 1 readings. Part of our week 1 readings is 3 hours of watching the First Australians documentary and  given that we're quizzed on it the actual time taken is easily longer. I prefer reading a slab of text rather than watching a video so this is hard but oh well. Week 1 seems to be a lot about giving more context and dispelling myths about Indigenous peoples (e.g. the hunter gatherer myth, how many people nations & languages there were on this continent, timelines etc.). This is definitely an area where I have a lot to learn and I'm glad I'm doing this as a unit where we get the chance to learn from and have discussions with Indigenous scientists because it's hard to know what to learn when you don't know what you don't know; I'd find these topics very hard to learn independently. I'm sad for how much knowledge has been permanently lost and/or destroyed but I'm hopeful at much is able to be learnt.

Macroeconomics haven't caught up on my lecture yet. As hum_student pointed out - maths + assignments with right/wrong answers. Atm we're going over things like GDP calculation and Moodle is giving my an overabundance of emails from people posting to be added to a group chat (why didn't someone set up a link to collect names rather than everyone individually replying and spamming us all?). One day the flood of emails will end. I had blissfully forgotten that first year units were like this. Fortunately, some of the discussion posts are actually useful for learning from and clarifying concepts.

Edit: in the time it took me to write this I received half a dozen macroeconomics emails :/
« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 11:34:29 am by Bri MT »