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March 06, 2021, 07:14:45 pm

Author Topic: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]  (Read 30638 times)  Share 

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clarke54321

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2018, 07:03:09 pm »
+6
Hi,
i have a question that relates to essay writing. So when i write my essay often my teacher would say that it is very wordy. My teacher says that the discussion and analysis is good however my sentences are a bit too long and sometimes doesn't read very easily. She told me write concisely, but i am not sure how to do that :(
Therefore, can anyone provide me any tips or tricks in order to write more concisely and perhaps make it easier for my assessor to read it?

Thank you in advance!

Hello  :)

There's likely to be a flawed planning process at the crux of this particular issue. As I've stressed on numerous occasions, it is critical that students spend enough time orchestrating and fine tuning the delivery of their essay before writing. Obviously the extent and depth of planning is highly individual, and will differ from student to student. However, here is a rough outline of my usual year 12, text response plans:


Introduction:
-What is my line of contextualisation going to be?
-How am I going to reconcile my main arguments into a nice flow?
-What is the ultimate 'statement' (contention) that I will come to?

Body paragraph (for all):
-What will the topic sentence be?
-First point of evidence (+ analysis of this)
-Second point of evidence (how will this strengthen my previous point/how do they work in unison, +analysis of this)
-Continue the process
-And so what is my linking statement?


By following this process, and doing a rough estimation of nearly every sentence, I could ensure that I'd always get to the root of my desired point. That is, I wouldn't be sacrificing the word count with superfluous information that would only obfuscate my analysis. So perhaps this kind of approach will help you overcome the wordiness of your essays. Please keep in mind that this 'extensive' analysis is not practical in exam situations. I only did this for practice pieces. But by doing so, I could write with ease under time pressure because I had mentally adapted to the type of process.

Let me know if you'd like some further clarification.
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Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]

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clarke54321

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2018, 08:43:54 pm »
+13
So it's that time of year where the English exam is either the closest or furthest thing from your mind. Regardless, the exam is inevitable, and something that you'll start preparing for either now or in the near future. And because English is one of those strange subjects, where you can't quite gauge your own standing, I've devised some revision tips and tricks for varying ability levels. So find the description that you most identify with and read on....



The "English will be fine" student- Perhaps English just isn't your thing, and you've spent much of the year convincing yourself that the perfect essay will spring from your hands on October 31. Or maybe you've been sidetracked by the alluring scaling of your other subjects, leaving English to sulk in a corner. Never fear. Just have a read of the following:

-It might sound simple, but actually read/watch your texts. Even if this is the bare minimum that you do before the exam, it will be the most important. I understand that this can be boring, so try and spice it up. If you are studying a play, perform it! When someone recommended this to me in year 12, I laughed and then recoiled. I am definitely not an acting student. However, when I started to enact my characters, I began to consciously adopt their thoughts, feelings and general person. And voila, I instantly developed a deeper understanding of the ‘world of the text.’ The same applies if you are studying a novel. While it will obviously be longer than a play, take it chapter by chapter.

-Read your past SACs. Reading your own work (especially when it has been completed under time pressure) can be the most cringeworthy thing you’ll ever do. But you need to be aware of your weaknesses before you start your revision. If you can’t penetrate the vagueness of your teacher’s comments, go and speak to them in person. Not by email. Teachers appreciate face to face communication with their students, and will be more willing to help you out if you take this effort. The same applies at university with tutors. So think of this as a skill.

-Bring your notes together. If you haven’t already, ensure that you have a folder that amalgamates each unit. In this way, you’ll be able to determine the characters and themes you are comfortable with for each respective text. Also, this provides the perfect opportunity for you to ‘paragraph workshop.’ That is, go back to the paragraphs you wrote earlier in the year and see if you can improve them. This type of activity also creates less work for yourself!



The "I like English, but I'm not sure if I've 'got' it" student- Sometimes it can be disheartening to read the magnificent sample essays on VCAA, where you feel like you need the help of a dictionary at every line. It seems that there is that 'touch' of sophistication that will be forever elusive in your own writing. If you're at this point, check out the following advice:

-Grab one of your essays and analyse it. Investigating your own writing is an extremely important skill. So try and understand whether you’re leaning more towards the active or passive tense, whether you’re using the same type of vocabulary and how you’re connecting your points of evidence. Once you pinpoint habits in your writing (we all have them!), you can start to make constructive decisions about what you should retain and what you should revise.

-Go through VCAA examiner reports and make a compilation of common errors. Far too often students tell me that they haven’t yet perused the VCAA reports. These should be your number 1 guide to VCE English. It is the closest you will get to the mind of the examiner. And we all want to know what goes on in the mind of an examiner, right? After you gather the common disturbances of examiners, (honestly) reflect on your own work, and question whether you are effectively implementing VCAA’s preferences.

-Read some reviews on your chosen text. What’s excellent about these reviews is that they’re often written by journalists, meaning that thematic ideas are navigated in a highly articulate manner. Where possible, see if there is also an interview with the author or director of your text. If there is, take account of the motivations behind certain choices. What is the main intention of a character or setting, for example? This meta understanding of a text will elevate the insight of your view and value statements.



The "I don't know how else I can prepare" student- You've been solid with your SAC marks, have developed your own preferred structures, style and vocab, and want to go that extra mile before the exam. Think you've already done it all? Have a look below:

-Scrutinise VCAA’s description of your text. You will find this with a simple google search (ie. VCAA English text list). I only stumbled across these late last year, and am so glad that I did. On face value, these descriptions are fairly standard and are more or less annotated explanations. But if you analyse this description alongside some previous VCAA prompts, you will notice that the implicit ideas are scarily similar. So be perceptive to the ideas taken fore granted by VCAA (ie. that Medea seeks a horrible vengeance - not a just endeavour). This takes me to my next point.

-Develop your own essay prompts. This is quite a challenge, but if you use the aforementioned description as a guide, you should be able to establish some interesting propositions. By consciously moving into the position of an 'assessor,' you begin to understand the 'grey' areas of your text, which will invariably find their way into almost any essay prompt. Further, this type of exercise may cause you to confront angles of the text that you've previously neglected and would ordinarily feel uncomfortable attacking in the exam.

-Construct a well-devised plan for argument analysis. At this stage of the year, you may be moving effortlessly through your analysis, explanation and audience reaction stages. But just ensure that you are able to set yourself up for this seamless transition in the final exam. Literally two weeks before the English exam, I still had trouble planning argument analyses. I became frustrated because I could never pick out the 'right' number of quotes to analyse per paragraph. And more importantly, I had trouble linking quotes together in a coherent manner. I needed to find a way for it all to 'click' under the time pressure. So work out what works best for you. Eventually, I found that a single dot on top of 5-6 important words or phrases of each paragraph and some crazy looking arrows (my connectors) worked like a dream.



Please feel free to clarify any ambiguous points with me. I'll be more than happy to answer your questions. All the very best for revision  :)

-Clarke


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Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]

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clarke54321

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2018, 09:59:23 pm »
+14
For completion purposes, I've decided to post one of my more radical Medea essays for those still pondering this wonderfully ambiguous text....


‘Oh, what an evil power love has in people’s lives!’ To what extent does Euripides show that love brings us pain'?

Euripides' tragedy Medea seeks to examine the human psyche and explore how extreme emotions motivate callous acts of violence. Indeed, the play understands the multifaceted emotion of love as an ‘evil power’, which has strength enough to torment one’s physical and moral self. Paradoxically, however, audiences are shown that this torment can be so visceral that its victims are no longer subject to suffering, but euphoric elation.

Euripides intimates that Jason’s obsessive sense of self-love motivates his betrayal of Medea, and thus her intractable suffering. The disapproving tone of the Nurse’s assertion, ‘Jason is a prisoner in a princess’s bed,’ indicates that Jason has been ensnared by a marriage predicated on mere royalty and image. The fact that the Nurse does not refer to Glauce by name, further stresses the idea that Jason is not enticed by the ‘princess’ herself, but by what he can gain from the ‘princess’s bed.’ This selfish desire for political alignment has in turn made Jason a ‘prisoner’ to his own cold reason. Yet, for Jason, this excessive reason is not perceived as a hindrance, but rather a means by which he can rationalise his desire for status, and thus his own self-love. Certainly, by preceding all his ideas with phrases such as, ‘first- and most important’ and ‘to begin with,’ Jason implies that much logic and cognition has led him to betray Medea for Glauce. Euripides imparts, however, that this ‘logical’ betrayal has left Medea ‘collapsed’ in overwhelming grief. That the playwright should use the verb ‘collapsed’ to describe Medea’s state indicates that she has been left immovable by anguish. Such an idea is propelled by the Nurse, who describes Medea as ‘a rock or wave of the sea.’ Here, the Nurse indicates that Medea, like an element of nature, is constant and resolute in her outpouring of ‘fierce’ distress. In reality, Jason’s self-indulgence and disloyalty has plagued Medea’s entire existence. From her ‘poor right hand’ that he once ‘clasped,’ to her ‘knees’ that he once ‘clung to,’ every element of Medea’s body has been shattered by Jason’s broken oaths.

Hence, Euripides maintains that intense feelings of love can make one vulnerable to physical agony. Indeed, prior to Medea’s deceptive machinations, Creon assertively informs her, ‘I’ve made my mind up; you’re my enemy.’ The calcified nature of this declaration implies that Creon is aware of Medea’s propensity for violence, and so seeks to circumvent its occurrence through the rationalised decision to banish her. Yet, this firmness of emotion is conspicuously quelled when Medea targets Creon’s ‘soft heart’ and appeals to his position as ‘a father.’ By challenging Creon’s capacity for love and affection as a father, Medea cunningly engenders a gross level of guilt within him, which consequently lessens his conviction. As a result of these emotional entreaties, Creon’s sentences become much more verbose with him declaring, ‘and I know it’s foolish of me now.’ This unconscious abandonment of sophrosyne, in want of love, is proven detrimental for Creon, who becomes inextricably ‘stuck’ to Glauce’s poisoned dress. Emblematically, however, Creon is ‘stuck’ to and entangled by the vehement love that he has for his daughter, which slowly ‘[tears]’ the ‘old flesh’ from his bones and ultimately annihilates his entire physical essence.   

Thus, Euripides seeks to warn audiences of the all-consuming affliction involved with neglecting strong feelings of love. As moral arbiters of the play, the Chorus acknowledge this deficiency in Jason, by stating that he is ‘so sure of destiny, and so ignorant.’ By identifying excessive pragmatism as a ‘superior strength,’ Jason has, in effect, subordinated the significance of love. In turn, he cannot grapple with nor comprehend why his ‘insult’ to Medea was ‘reason enough’ for her to commit infanticide. But more significantly, for not perceiving love as a motivator for action, Jason’s entire dynastic line and path to prosperity has been obliterated. From the unusual overtones of passion and despair that flood the phrase, ‘my life wrecked,’ audiences’ can discern that Jason’s character has been enveloped by abject sorrow as a result. Yet, Medea herself does not escape the full torment of her children’s death. By ‘steel[ing] [herself] to’ kill her children, Medea seeks to subjugate any maternal feelings of love that may weaken her heart. Indeed, from her ‘sudden flood of weeping’ at the thought of committing filicide, Medea is proven capable of harbouring sincere feelings of love, like any other mother. The suppression of these strong feelings, however, distress Medea to the extent that she can only scream, No! No! No! By all the fiends of hate in hell’s depths, no!’, at her logic. Here, the repetition of the word, ‘No,’ and Vellacott’s application of exclamation marks, enable Euripides to stridently punctuate Medea’s sense of disquiet and ultimately, the way a conscious suppression of love has disintegrated her moral being.

However, Euripides imparts that this disquiet is so savage that Medea is no longer pained by her children’s deaths. Despite illustrating a capacity to love her children, Medea’s ‘passionate indignation’ at Jason’s infidelity reaches such a height that she can no longer differentiate between what love she has for her children and what she has for him. Such is underscored by the Nurse, who asks ‘what they have to do with their father’s wickedness.’ With the emphasis on the word ‘they,’ the Nurse implies that Medea sees an echo of her former, tainted love for Jason in her sons. Indeed, by leaving the children unnamed and keeping their dialogue to a minimum, Euripides seeks to dehumanise them and leave them as a figurative manifestation of tainted love. In this sense, audiences can better comprehend why Medea opts to slaughter her children in the most brutal way possible; by ‘sword,’ not her mythical ‘bent’ of poison. Hence, by killing her children, Medea has effectively destroyed any lasting remnant of the love she once had for Jason, and left his ‘head shattered’ for having taken away his literal prosperity. And for this, Medea ecstatically rises up against him and exults at how she has ‘take[n] away [his] smile.’ 

In essence, Medea strives to understand the complexities that are masked behind the human emotion of love. Certainty, Euripides emphasises that love left unchecked, regardless of its form, has the capacity to torture one in both a literal and metaphysical sense. Yet, the playwright maintains that this torture can be so intense that mortals sometimes have no choice but to relish in it.

« Last Edit: September 17, 2018, 10:01:00 pm by clarke54321 »
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Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]

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Seno72

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2018, 07:36:28 pm »
+2
For completion purposes, I've decided to post one of my more radical Medea essays for those still pondering this wonderfully ambiguous text....


‘Oh, what an evil power love has in people’s lives!’ To what extent does Euripides show that love brings us pain'?

Euripides' tragedy Medea seeks to examine the human psyche and explore how extreme emotions motivate callous acts of violence. Indeed, the play understands the multifaceted emotion of love as an ‘evil power’, which has strength enough to torment one’s physical and moral self. Paradoxically, however, audiences are shown that this torment can be so visceral that its victims are no longer subject to suffering, but euphoric elation.

Euripides intimates that Jason’s obsessive sense of self-love motivates his betrayal of Medea, and thus her intractable suffering. The disapproving tone of the Nurse’s assertion, ‘Jason is a prisoner in a princess’s bed,’ indicates that Jason has been ensnared by a marriage predicated on mere royalty and image. The fact that the Nurse does not refer to Glauce by name, further stresses the idea that Jason is not enticed by the ‘princess’ herself, but by what he can gain from the ‘princess’s bed.’ This selfish desire for political alignment has in turn made Jason a ‘prisoner’ to his own cold reason. Yet, for Jason, this excessive reason is not perceived as a hindrance, but rather a means by which he can rationalise his desire for status, and thus his own self-love. Certainly, by preceding all his ideas with phrases such as, ‘first- and most important’ and ‘to begin with,’ Jason implies that much logic and cognition has led him to betray Medea for Glauce. Euripides imparts, however, that this ‘logical’ betrayal has left Medea ‘collapsed’ in overwhelming grief. That the playwright should use the verb ‘collapsed’ to describe Medea’s state indicates that she has been left immovable by anguish. Such an idea is propelled by the Nurse, who describes Medea as ‘a rock or wave of the sea.’ Here, the Nurse indicates that Medea, like an element of nature, is constant and resolute in her outpouring of ‘fierce’ distress. In reality, Jason’s self-indulgence and disloyalty has plagued Medea’s entire existence. From her ‘poor right hand’ that he once ‘clasped,’ to her ‘knees’ that he once ‘clung to,’ every element of Medea’s body has been shattered by Jason’s broken oaths.

Hence, Euripides maintains that intense feelings of love can make one vulnerable to physical agony. Indeed, prior to Medea’s deceptive machinations, Creon assertively informs her, ‘I’ve made my mind up; you’re my enemy.’ The calcified nature of this declaration implies that Creon is aware of Medea’s propensity for violence, and so seeks to circumvent its occurrence through the rationalised decision to banish her. Yet, this firmness of emotion is conspicuously quelled when Medea targets Creon’s ‘soft heart’ and appeals to his position as ‘a father.’ By challenging Creon’s capacity for love and affection as a father, Medea cunningly engenders a gross level of guilt within him, which consequently lessens his conviction. As a result of these emotional entreaties, Creon’s sentences become much more verbose with him declaring, ‘and I know it’s foolish of me now.’ This unconscious abandonment of sophrosyne, in want of love, is proven detrimental for Creon, who becomes inextricably ‘stuck’ to Glauce’s poisoned dress. Emblematically, however, Creon is ‘stuck’ to and entangled by the vehement love that he has for his daughter, which slowly ‘[tears]’ the ‘old flesh’ from his bones and ultimately annihilates his entire physical essence.   

Thus, Euripides seeks to warn audiences of the all-consuming affliction involved with neglecting strong feelings of love. As moral arbiters of the play, the Chorus acknowledge this deficiency in Jason, by stating that he is ‘so sure of destiny, and so ignorant.’ By identifying excessive pragmatism as a ‘superior strength,’ Jason has, in effect, subordinated the significance of love. In turn, he cannot grapple with nor comprehend why his ‘insult’ to Medea was ‘reason enough’ for her to commit infanticide. But more significantly, for not perceiving love as a motivator for action, Jason’s entire dynastic line and path to prosperity has been obliterated. From the unusual overtones of passion and despair that flood the phrase, ‘my life wrecked,’ audiences’ can discern that Jason’s character has been enveloped by abject sorrow as a result. Yet, Medea herself does not escape the full torment of her children’s death. By ‘steel[ing] [herself] to’ kill her children, Medea seeks to subjugate any maternal feelings of love that may weaken her heart. Indeed, from her ‘sudden flood of weeping’ at the thought of committing filicide, Medea is proven capable of harbouring sincere feelings of love, like any other mother. The suppression of these strong feelings, however, distress Medea to the extent that she can only scream, No! No! No! By all the fiends of hate in hell’s depths, no!’, at her logic. Here, the repetition of the word, ‘No,’ and Vellacott’s application of exclamation marks, enable Euripides to stridently punctuate Medea’s sense of disquiet and ultimately, the way a conscious suppression of love has disintegrated her moral being.

However, Euripides imparts that this disquiet is so savage that Medea is no longer pained by her children’s deaths. Despite illustrating a capacity to love her children, Medea’s ‘passionate indignation’ at Jason’s infidelity reaches such a height that she can no longer differentiate between what love she has for her children and what she has for him. Such is underscored by the Nurse, who asks ‘what they have to do with their father’s wickedness.’ With the emphasis on the word ‘they,’ the Nurse implies that Medea sees an echo of her former, tainted love for Jason in her sons. Indeed, by leaving the children unnamed and keeping their dialogue to a minimum, Euripides seeks to dehumanise them and leave them as a figurative manifestation of tainted love. In this sense, audiences can better comprehend why Medea opts to slaughter her children in the most brutal way possible; by ‘sword,’ not her mythical ‘bent’ of poison. Hence, by killing her children, Medea has effectively destroyed any lasting remnant of the love she once had for Jason, and left his ‘head shattered’ for having taken away his literal prosperity. And for this, Medea ecstatically rises up against him and exults at how she has ‘take[n] away [his] smile.’ 

In essence, Medea strives to understand the complexities that are masked behind the human emotion of love. Certainty, Euripides emphasises that love left unchecked, regardless of its form, has the capacity to torture one in both a literal and metaphysical sense. Yet, the playwright maintains that this torture can be so intense that mortals sometimes have no choice but to relish in it.



Hey Clarke. In your god-awesome essays you use a variety of vocabulary instead of having the same word 3 times in a BP like I do. What do you normally do to use variety of vocabulary, do you normally memorise them or do they randomly pop into your head when you can use them at the right time. Is there any tips you could give us on expanding our vocabulary or is it just pure memorisation you have to do. Thanks!
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clarke54321

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2018, 09:01:22 pm »
+6
Hey Clarke. In your god-awesome essays you use a variety of vocabulary instead of having the same word 3 times in a BP like I do. What do you normally do to use variety of vocabulary, do you normally memorise them or do they randomly pop into your head when you can use them at the right time. Is there any tips you could give us on expanding our vocabulary or is it just pure memorisation you have to do. Thanks!

Hello Seno  :)

I'm pleased to hear that you find the essays helpful!

As you will have read from my previous comments, I used to spend a substantial amount of time planning each essay. This didn't just involve arguments or contentions, but also targeted vocabulary that would best convey my points. In this respect, I'd say that my word choices in my essays were all conscious- not coincidental. In saying that, however, constant planning throughout the year meant that the right words did come to me at the right time in the exam. Now, I don't know if this was a fluke, or the product of continuous effort. I'd like to think it was the latter!

Therefore, in terms of advice, I'd just encourage you to take a look over your previous essays and look for words that you think are a bit bland. Look for an appropriate synonym (ensuring that you are fully aware of its application), and try and incorporate this in future essays when seeking to express the same idea. Try not to get too adventurous with less than a month before the English exam  ;D Above all, clarity is your priority.

All the very best.
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Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]

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kaitlynsmith

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #20 on: June 06, 2019, 09:27:53 pm »
0
Hi!
First off, you're writing is absolutely gorgeous !
I just had one question - in your tips for analysing argument, you use the phrase 'this in turn encourages readers to' and I was wondering how that differs from 'this makes/urges/compels the reader to feel' that you suggested to avoid ?
Thanks in advance!

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2021, 11:21:00 am »
0
I wish, I wish, I wish I saw this during year 12 English.
@kaitlynsmith - I think it's different because it's not forcing them to but rather inciting them to.
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clarke54321

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #22 on: January 25, 2021, 12:59:00 pm »
+5
Hi!
First off, you're writing is absolutely gorgeous !
I just had one question - in your tips for analysing argument, you use the phrase 'this in turn encourages readers to' and I was wondering how that differs from 'this makes/urges/compels the reader to feel' that you suggested to avoid ?
Thanks in advance!

I realise that my response to this post is extremely overdue! This is a great question, and the difference between the two options is very subtle. A phrase like, "this encourages readers to...", is much more speculative than one like, "this makes readers...". As stressed in many VCAA reports, the point of the argument analysis is to make comment on an author's intentions only, not the end result of their language use. If I were to choose the latter phrase, I would be making a firm judgement about how the reader will react, rather than analysing how the author is using language to seek a certain outcome. You can achieve this preferred style of analysis through other phrase types as well. For example, "this is likely to evoke sadness from readers" or "author X intends to provoke outrage among readers".


I wish, I wish, I wish I saw this during year 12 English.
@kaitlynsmith - I think it's different because it's not forcing them to but rather inciting them to.

I'm sorry you weren't able to see it earlier - I have been fairly absent from the forums and hope to be around more this year! And you're spot on with the difference between the two phrases  :)
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Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]

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JIN1N

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #23 on: February 21, 2021, 10:05:04 am »
+1
Hey Clarke,
Quick question for you. I noticed that you alluded to browsing scholarly articles in order to expose yourself to complex analysis, ideas and vocabulary that much of the state won't possess. Just in that regard, what types of articles do you suggest browsing for development in VCE English?

clarke54321

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #24 on: February 21, 2021, 02:27:26 pm »
+1
Hey Clarke,
Quick question for you. I noticed that you alluded to browsing scholarly articles in order to expose yourself to complex analysis, ideas and vocabulary that much of the state won't possess. Just in that regard, what types of articles do you suggest browsing for development in VCE English?

Thanks for your question JIN1N  :)

Browsing scholarly articles applies mostly to the text response and comparative sections of the VCE English course. So, whatever text you are studying for your text response, for example, see if you can find journal articles related to it on JSTOR, Google Scholar, etc. Some of the VCE English texts are quite modern, so there may not be any relevant articles on research databases. However, I'd still encourage you to locate articles that focus on texts with a similar genre/theme, or articles that examine texts written by the same author. It may take some digging to find an article that you click with, but the time you take investigating will definitely pay off.

Good luck and let me know if you have any other questions!
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JIN1N

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2021, 09:05:49 pm »
0
Hey Clarke,
Thanks for your reply  :)
I have another question if you don't mind. I have a language analysis sac coming up in 3 weeks. What should I do to prepare? Practice writing as many essays in timed conditions? or Writing a couple well-structured essays and then adapting that structure to my writing as my preparation? or do you have any other advice?


clarke54321

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Re: Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]
« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2021, 08:42:43 pm »
+1
Hey Clarke,
Thanks for your reply  :)
I have another question if you don't mind. I have a language analysis sac coming up in 3 weeks. What should I do to prepare? Practice writing as many essays in timed conditions? or Writing a couple well-structured essays and then adapting that structure to my writing as my preparation? or do you have any other advice?

I don't necessarily think it is important to do as many language analyses as possible under timed conditions. Many students fall into this trap and end up focussing too much on quantity, rather than the quality of their analysis. Spend time constructing well thought-out body paragraphs, paying close attention to how you analyse the progression of an argument. Reviewing your own work and understanding your general paragraph patterns can be really valuable, and means that you already have some kind of working structure when it comes to the timed SAC. If you don't feel like writing anything, another helpful exercise is to go through a language analysis article and decide how you would split the arguments up and what pieces of language you would use to analyse. All the best with it :)
BA (Linguistics) I University of Melbourne
Tips and Tricks for VCE English [50]

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