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September 16, 2019, 08:14:08 am

Author Topic: DRAMA ESSAYS! How to write them without dying (theatrically)  (Read 9859 times)  Share 

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sudodds

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Re: DRAMA ESSAYS! How to write them without dying (theatrically)
« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2017, 10:01:38 pm »
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Thank you so much!! With only two days until the HSC exam this has helped me heaps considering I had no idea how to properly write one of these. Just wondering though, assuming I won't have time to write the 3 paragraphs per text in the exam will just the context paragraph and singular workshop paragraph per text be enough to get good marks? Since it means I'll only be talking about one scene per play just thinking that might make it look like I don't know the play very well, i dunno.
I think that should be fine. Ideally, if you have time to fit it in its a good idea, however if you are running out of time, skipping out on the imagined response/2nd workshop should be fine :) its not a requirement to have one, as in they can't automatically doc marks for it, it just gives you more opportunity to gain marks if that makes sense :)
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2016 HSC: Modern History (18th in NSW) | History Extension (2nd place in the HTA Extension History Essay Prize) | Ancient History | Drama | English Advanced | Studies of Religion I | Economics

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irafriedberg

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Re: DRAMA ESSAYS! How to write them without dying (theatrically)
« Reply #16 on: November 06, 2017, 12:27:44 pm »
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I think that should be fine. Ideally, if you have time to fit it in its a good idea, however if you are running out of time, skipping out on the imagined response/2nd workshop should be fine :) its not a requirement to have one, as in they can't automatically doc marks for it, it just gives you more opportunity to gain marks if that makes sense :)

Alright cool thankyou! Sorry for the annoyance but just one more question though, what about references to real world productions? Our teacher taught us to have paragraphs talking about how a scene was performed in say a Belvoir Street Production rather than strictly workshop examples and what I'd direct. Are these necessary or was my teacher just clueless?

sudodds

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Re: DRAMA ESSAYS! How to write them without dying (theatrically)
« Reply #17 on: November 06, 2017, 12:41:28 pm »
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Alright cool thankyou! Sorry for the annoyance but just one more question though, what about references to real world productions? Our teacher taught us to have paragraphs talking about how a scene was performed in say a Belvoir Street Production rather than strictly workshop examples and what I'd direct. Are these necessary or was my teacher just clueless?
No thats definitely a great idea! You wouldn't get marked down for not including them, but having some real world productions definitely won't hurt - it just adds yet another layer of discussion to your essay :)
FREE HISTORY EXTENSION LECTURE - CLICK HERE FOR INFO!

2016 HSC: Modern History (18th in NSW) | History Extension (2nd place in the HTA Extension History Essay Prize) | Ancient History | Drama | English Advanced | Studies of Religion I | Economics

ATAR: 97.80

Studying a Bachelor of Communications: Media Arts and Production at UTS 😊

Looking for a history tutor? I'm ya girl! Feel free to send me a PM if you're interested!

irafriedberg

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Re: DRAMA ESSAYS! How to write them without dying (theatrically)
« Reply #18 on: November 06, 2017, 04:02:27 pm »
+1
No thats definitely a great idea! You wouldn't get marked down for not including them, but having some real world productions definitely won't hurt - it just adds yet another layer of discussion to your essay :)

Awesome, thank you so much!!

mwhaley

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Re: DRAMA ESSAYS! How to write them without dying (theatrically)
« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2018, 12:15:49 pm »
+2
This is amazing!
The Drama teacher who taught you this structure must be an incredible human being!
That stuff about half creative writing half analysis, wow!
He must have been a genius with incredibly structured and well thought out processes for writing Drama essays that he generously taught to his class.

RuiAce

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Re: DRAMA ESSAYS! How to write them without dying (theatrically)
« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2018, 12:21:09 pm »
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This is amazing!
The Drama teacher who taught you this structure must be an incredible human being!
That stuff about half creative writing half analysis, wow!
He must have been a genius with incredibly structured and well thought out processes for writing Drama essays that he generously taught to his class.
It must be true

sudodds

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Re: DRAMA ESSAYS! How to write them without dying (theatrically)
« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2018, 12:26:55 pm »
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This is amazing!
The Drama teacher who taught you this structure must be an incredible human being!
That stuff about half creative writing half analysis, wow!
He must have been a genius with incredibly structured and well thought out processes for writing Drama essays that he generously taught to his class.
He most definitely was 😉 Couldn’t have made through the year without him... what was his name again? Whale something or other?
« Last Edit: March 27, 2018, 05:46:33 pm by sudodds »
FREE HISTORY EXTENSION LECTURE - CLICK HERE FOR INFO!

2016 HSC: Modern History (18th in NSW) | History Extension (2nd place in the HTA Extension History Essay Prize) | Ancient History | Drama | English Advanced | Studies of Religion I | Economics

ATAR: 97.80

Studying a Bachelor of Communications: Media Arts and Production at UTS 😊

Looking for a history tutor? I'm ya girl! Feel free to send me a PM if you're interested!

stefanie.bruzze

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Re: DRAMA ESSAYS! How to write them without dying (theatrically)
« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2019, 07:55:07 pm »
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Hey guys! - I was wondering if someone would be able to read my drama essay and give me some tips on what to add to 'The Bald Prima Donna' section? - thanks! Practice essay question: How did plays of the 20th century use theatre to reflect the horrors and injustices of their time? Discuss with reference to TWO plays in this topic.

Notable plays not only reflect the injustices and horrors of their time, but transcend the time and place for which they were originally written, offering insight into the fundamental traits that characterise our own humanity. This is evident in Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Eugene Ionesco’s The Bald Prima Donna which confront the brutality of war through Epic Theatre and absurdism respectively. The plays, reflective of their social and political milieu, depict the nature of human greed which kills human empathy (Mother Courage) and the meaningless of life when logic is demanded from a world gone seemingly mad in The Bald Prima Donna through techniques and theatre conventions.

Brecht’s use of innovative techniques in Mother Courage augment the pivotal actions that catalyse human beings, expressing how morals, in times of survival, waver; the results of tough choices are harsh judgement. Brecht’s approach to theatre forces his audiences to detach themselves from their common knowledge and “to tell people the truth about life and the[ir] social situation” (Adler). Through the form of an episodic structure, Brecht informs audiences of the impact that a capitalist figure, through the representation of ‘Mother Courage’, can have upon a war inflicted society as well as the lengths to which one would go for wealth in a violent-ridden world. Brecht, through his use of minimalist staging and props, wishes for his audience to consider why something is happening instead of how. He wished for audiences to “step into the theatre” and reflect upon the environment of their outside world which has just witnessed the brutality and horrors of World War 2. Brecht focused on the representation of human greed and how it is killing human empathy, demanding his audience to ponder on the idea that ‘human destiny is alterable’. Through class workshopping experiences, our class wished to reflect the idea of Mother Courage wanting wealth instead of providing protection and safety for her children. As a class, we decided to enact Scene 11 of the play. T.C was chosen to depict ‘Kattrin’, Mother Courage’s daughter and was positioned on a table to reflect her protest for human lives so as to awaken the townsfolk. We also utilised sounds through the use of a garbage lid as the drum to assist in the rising tension of the scene. The other students of the class played the ‘soldiers’ wo were positioned on a lower level in the drama space in order to symbolise the power struggle between both opposing parties. The sound of gunshots by the actors then caused ‘Kattrin’ to fall to the floor with an audible thud, and thus depicting her inevitable downfall against the soldiers. Mother Courage’s response to this, having to “get back to work” after her daughter’s death, highlights the length to which one would go for monetary happiness , placing profit ahead of her own children. This essential theme in the play and our playbuilding of this scene reflects the horrors that Brecht was wishing to convey in his play and the idea that humans should always choose empathy over greed.

Ionesco’s absurdist and cyclical play, The Bald Prima Donna mirrors the illogical nature of both WW1 and WW2 and the aftermath of its destruction upon the meaning of language as a communication device between individuals. Ionesco, through his depiction of two conventional middle class couples, wished to show to his audiences that those who neglect the past are destined to repeat it. Ionesco as a playwright acknowledged the need for communication after the destruction of thousands of lives as a way of moving forward. If I was directing this play, I would implement the use of a revolving stage to replicate the cyclical nature of chaos (such as World War 2) with the positioning of the two couples on opposite sides of the stage. This rotating stage would be used throughout the entire play to show aspect of human experience that recurring such as everyday meals at work and social life that are centred around banal routine. Ultimately Eugene Ionesco wishes for audiences to reflect on their own lives and looks for meaning in their seemingly devoid world. It Is through his play that audiences gain insight into the brutality and horror that characterises our own modern society.

Significant plays of the 20th century enhance our own understanding and awareness of the inherent traits that characterise us as human beings. Both Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Eugene Ionesco’s The Bald Prima Donna give insight into the dilemmas of the 20th century and the continual horrors of our own 21st-century lives.