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January 22, 2020, 05:41:47 am

Author Topic: Tense in oral  (Read 1747 times)  Share 

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exit

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Tense in oral
« on: September 07, 2016, 01:57:53 pm »
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Can't seem to get a clear answer with conflicting opinions on this. For example, if my general study is on resistance groups, should I say 'they were a resistance group' or 'they are a resistance group' or does it matter at all? Is it ok to describe things in present unless its referring to past events or is it ok to say events in present like in english when talking about a text type?

Thanks
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Alter

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Re: Tense in oral
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2016, 04:01:17 pm »
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Hi exit!

Could you please clarify the German words you are using to express this? At any rate, I suppose it'd depend on whether or not the group currently exists and that the sentence is still true in the present. If it is not, then it's more appropriate to use past tense, e.g. 'Es gab eine Widerstandsgruppe, die gegen die Politik der Regierung protestiert haben'.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2016, 04:03:52 pm by Alter »
2016–2018: Bachelor of Biomedicine (Neuroscience), The University of Melbourne
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exit

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Re: Tense in oral
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2016, 08:37:24 am »
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Hi exit!

Could you please clarify the German words you are using to express this? At any rate, I suppose it'd depend on whether or not the group currently exists and that the sentence is still true in the present. If it is not, then it's more appropriate to use past tense, e.g. 'Es gab eine Widerstandsgruppe, die gegen die Politik der Regierung protestiert haben'.

thanks! What I needed. What about describing things in a resource?

Im Buch hört er schlechte Sachen über die Regierung in der Antede und kommt traurig zurück.

Or should past be used?
VCE [ATAR: 99.25]: Physics 1/2, English 1/2, EngLang,Methods, Spesh, Accounting, Chem, German

2018-2021: Bachelor Of Commerce @ University of Melbourne - Melbourne National Merit Scholarship
VCE English Language: A+ Short Answer Guide[pm for extra guidance!]

exit

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Re: Tense in oral
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2016, 08:37:46 am »
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thanks! What I needed. What about describing things in a resource?

Im Buch hört er schlechte Sachen über die Regierung in der Anrede und kommt traurig zurück.

Or should past be used?
VCE [ATAR: 99.25]: Physics 1/2, English 1/2, EngLang,Methods, Spesh, Accounting, Chem, German

2018-2021: Bachelor Of Commerce @ University of Melbourne - Melbourne National Merit Scholarship
VCE English Language: A+ Short Answer Guide[pm for extra guidance!]

Alter

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Re: Tense in oral
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2016, 11:01:17 am »
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Looking at my detailed study from last year, I used the past tense to describe the stories that were told in my book. However, upon doing a bit of googling, I've learned that there is something known as the 'literary present', whereby you would use the present to recount events in a book/narrative as though the events are currently ongoing as they are described.

What I'd recommend to you? It doesn't really matter which one you pick, as long as you're consistent about it. Either way won't sound particularly funny or odd to a native speaker. Choose whichever sounds more natural to you in the event that you need to improvise a response, and keep using that tense when you're describing the things in the resource.

Hope this helps.
2016–2018: Bachelor of Biomedicine (Neuroscience), The University of Melbourne
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exit

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Re: Tense in oral
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2016, 03:40:45 pm »
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Looking at my detailed study from last year, I used the past tense to describe the stories that were told in my book. However, upon doing a bit of googling, I've learned that there is something known as the 'literary present', whereby you would use the present to recount events in a book/narrative as though the events are currently ongoing as they are described.

What I'd recommend to you? It doesn't really matter which one you pick, as long as you're consistent about it. Either way won't sound particularly funny or odd to a native speaker. Choose whichever sounds more natural to you in the event that you need to improvise a response, and keep using that tense when you're describing the things in the resource.

Hope this helps.

Thanks for the answer! I got what I wanted from a VCAA examiner. Anyway, if anyone has any oral tips, everything is MUCH appreciate. Every mark counts!
VCE [ATAR: 99.25]: Physics 1/2, English 1/2, EngLang,Methods, Spesh, Accounting, Chem, German

2018-2021: Bachelor Of Commerce @ University of Melbourne - Melbourne National Merit Scholarship
VCE English Language: A+ Short Answer Guide[pm for extra guidance!]

Alter

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Re: Tense in oral
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2016, 04:04:24 pm »
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Thanks for the answer! I got what I wanted from a VCAA examiner. Anyway, if anyone has any oral tips, everything is MUCH appreciate. Every mark counts!
oh cool. Do you mind sharing what answer you received here?
2016–2018: Bachelor of Biomedicine (Neuroscience), The University of Melbourne
2019–2022: Doctor of Medicine, The University of Melbourne