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December 14, 2019, 03:23:08 am

Author Topic: VCE English Language Question Thread  (Read 38483 times)  Share 

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leonm19

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #255 on: October 09, 2019, 10:21:09 pm »
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Following on from what cap78 said, I was also wondering what is the best way to study for the Eng Lang exam, and how many quotes and contemporary examples should we aim to remember?

1vindex

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #256 on: October 11, 2019, 06:40:27 pm »
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Is the Broad Australian accent considered non-standard English, or more like an extreme in the continuum of standard English?

nianid

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #257 on: October 14, 2019, 06:26:38 pm »
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Hey guys I have a questions about contemporary examples.
Is it suitable to use contemporary examples from 2018 or do they all have to be from 2019? Thanks!
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Seamus Wong

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #258 on: October 14, 2019, 06:40:14 pm »
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Hey guys I have a questions about contemporary examples.
Is it suitable to use contemporary examples from 2018 or do they all have to be from 2019? Thanks!

My teacher says to use 2019 examples only and only use late 2018 examples if you have to.
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Seamus Wong

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #259 on: October 14, 2019, 06:48:37 pm »
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Is the Broad Australian accent considered non-standard English, or more like an extreme in the continuum of standard English?

Nothing non-standard about the broad accent.
Speakers of the broad accent are likely to employ non-standard language features however
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KiNSKi01

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #260 on: October 22, 2019, 10:49:46 pm »
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Yo anyone got some recent examples of call-out culture/cancel culture which can be linked to discrim lang (and also linked to to e-lang as a result of social media)?
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AngelWings

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #261 on: October 24, 2019, 05:24:12 pm »
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Yo anyone got some recent examples of call-out culture/cancel culture which can be linked to discrim lang (and also linked to to e-lang as a result of social media)?
I’m pretty sure there’ll be some linguistic gold from the whole James Charles/ Tatiana Westbrook situation earlier this year. Not only was it an example of cancel culture, but it was also very prevalent on social media, particularly on YouTube.
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Seamus Wong

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #262 on: October 25, 2019, 09:12:15 am »
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I’m pretty sure there’ll be some linguistic gold from the whole James Charles/ Tatiana Westbrook situation earlier this year. Not only was it an example of cancel culture, but it was also very prevalent on social media, particularly on YouTube.

examiners wont like u cos it aint in the Australian context
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Darool

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #263 on: October 25, 2019, 05:31:14 pm »
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Hello. I was just wondering if this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToBdcRGsqr8​) would be a good example for how language links with identity? It also shows how a person who does not identify with the group can still act like they do..?

Although it's not in the Australian context, the idea and jargon they use should still apply worldwide.,, i think

Thank you :)

AngelWings

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #264 on: October 25, 2019, 06:39:44 pm »
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Yo anyone got some recent examples of call-out culture/cancel culture which can be linked to discrim lang (and also linked to to e-lang as a result of social media)?
examiners wont like u cos it aint in the Australian context
Another example could also be the very recent Michael Leunig (famous Australian cartoonist) situation that happened yesterday, where the cartoonist drew attention to women’s usage of phones in his work. Leunig has been described as “misogynistic” over it amongst other things. The language used  both in the cartoon and in response to it might be of interest to current Eng Lang students: link here
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KiNSKi01

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #265 on: October 25, 2019, 09:53:34 pm »
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Another example could also be the very recent Michael Leunig (famous Australian cartoonist) situation that happened yesterday, where the cartoonist drew attention to women’s usage of phones in his work. Leunig has been described as “misogynistic” over it amongst other things. The language used  both in the cartoon and in response to it might be of interest to current Eng Lang students: link here

Ooh yes that's gold

Unsure what to really quote from the article tho
In terms of linguistics, what is the big draw away from it
« Last Edit: October 25, 2019, 10:05:38 pm by KiNSKi01 »
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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #266 on: October 26, 2019, 05:12:32 pm »
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Ooh yes that's gold

Unsure what to really quote from the article tho
In terms of linguistics, what is the big draw away from it
To turn the tables a bit on you, what do you think? People could interpret the cartoon and its resulting backlash in several different ways.

It’s been a good while since I did Eng Lang (read: 2014), so I’m nowhere near updated on the current study design and I’m super rusty, therefore, please take my interpretation of the above situation with a grain of salt.

Anyway, from a linguistic standpoint, in my opinion, I’d be pinpointing at two places mostly:
1. the cartoon itself - how Leunig mimics how mothers talk to/ about their babies e.g. “Mummy” and “bubby”, and how the lines in the comic’s caption were rhyming, as if it were a children’s story. (You could probably link this to identity and context or something.)
2. the resulting reactions, especially Clementine Ford’s (a known feminist writer) immediate linguistic choice of swear words (which she usually does unapologetically; her Twitter profile includes “foul mouthed” in the description) and Mary Leunig’s (Michael’s sister) use of Australian slang “having a go at women”, as well as stating that her brother uses the technique of “feminist baiting” to stir up controversy (as seen from link here).
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Jimmmy

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #267 on: October 26, 2019, 09:14:18 pm »
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@AngelWings; I've always found the 'reactions' to a variety of non-PC language (eg. Izzy Folau earlier this year) seem to be more reflective of the attitudes to varieties and views of taboo than original examples. Do you think it's fair to bring up these 'responses' (eg. Clementine Ford's labelling of Leuning as a '...gronk') as good pieces of evidence for essay topics requiring 'the views of Australian society on discriminatory, taboo, or socially divisive language'?

Likewise, do you think you could call Leunig's cartoon 'formal'?
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AngelWings

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #268 on: October 27, 2019, 03:35:25 pm »
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@AngelWings; I've always found the 'reactions' to a variety of non-PC language (eg. Izzy Folau earlier this year) seem to be more reflective of the attitudes to varieties and views of taboo than original examples. Do you think it's fair to bring up these 'responses' (eg. Clementine Ford's labelling of Leuning as a '...gronk') as good pieces of evidence for essay topics requiring 'the views of Australian society on discriminatory, taboo, or socially divisive language'?
As I said, it’s been a while since I did Eng Lang and that area was a smaller aspect of the study design in my time, if my memory serves me correctly, so I might be on the wrong track entirely. The main part right now is probably to agree with the current study design and what VCAA assessors are after, so if they don’t really agree that responses should be included, then simply don’t risk it during the exam and, instead, we look for a different example.

I brought this example up purely because I thought it might be helpful, although I was unsure of its usefulness to begin with. Upon re-reading my reply above, my interpretation seems to cross between a language analysis for English and contemporary examples for Eng Lang Section C, so... sorry for leading you all on.

Feel free to disregard or interpret the linguistics of that example as you wish. 

Do I think it’s fair? Maybe - in a pinch. I’m not so sure...

Summary: Depends on whether VCAA assessors like using responses, which last I heard wasn’t exactly ideal and should be resorted to as back up. It’s more than likely my interpretation and this example wasn’t as helpful as I’d imagined it to be, so use the above with your utmost caution.

Likewise, do you think you could call Leunig's cartoon 'formal'?
Honestly, I’m not 100% sure myself. I’m generally more inclined to say informal language, but formal context (as it’s published in The Age), but after those mistakes above, I’m not so sure of myself.
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KiNSKi01

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Re: VCE English Language Question Thread
« Reply #269 on: October 28, 2019, 05:57:24 pm »
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hey I'm confused about what lexical repetition exactly means

Does it mean repetition of a specific lexeme or does it mean repetition of lexemes which share similar semantics (thus making it a feature of coherency be reflecting consistency in FLICCC)?
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