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October 21, 2019, 05:20:34 pm

Author Topic: HSC Biology Question Thread  (Read 135735 times)  Share 

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dani01

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1335 on: August 06, 2019, 06:32:45 pm »
+1
 Would someone be able to say in order from smallest to largest the size of different pathogens
also does anyone have any good mnemonics for remembering the pathogens that order?
thanks!

InnererSchweinehund

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1336 on: August 06, 2019, 07:18:44 pm »
+1
Would someone be able to say in order from smallest to largest the size of different pathogens
also does anyone have any good mnemonics for remembering the pathogens that order?
thanks!

Hi,
Unfortunately I don't have any memorable mnemonics but in order from smallest to largest the pathogens are:

Prion
Virus
Bacteria
Protozoa
Fungi
Macroparasite

Hope this helps!
 ;D

dani01

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1337 on: August 07, 2019, 09:04:19 am »
+1
Hi,
Unfortunately I don't have any memorable mnemonics but in order from smallest to largest the pathogens are:

Prion
Virus
Bacteria
Protozoa
Fungi
Macroparasite

Hope this helps!
 ;D

That's ok and thanks for your help 

thereal_laura

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1338 on: August 14, 2019, 08:55:33 pm »
0
what is/are the most important things to remember for bio trials/HSC?
just asking bc trials tomorrow, wack
2019 HSC SUBJECTS

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viraankumar

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1339 on: August 24, 2019, 05:08:06 pm »
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HSC Biology Question Papers Download. Check for more Latest Biology Science Updates. Apply for the latest govt jobs - Portal

Kombmail

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1340 on: September 23, 2019, 11:07:59 pm »
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Q. In domestic cats, when exploring crosses involving two fur colours (black and orange) the following observation is always made: A cross between an orange female and black male produces orange males and tortoiseshell shell female offspring. (Tortoiseshell is a mix of orange and black fur)
The most likely explanation for this is that the alleles for fur colour demonstrate?
A)sex- linkage
B)co-dominance
C)incomplete dominance
D) sex linkage and co - dominance

Guys for this question the answer is D but can someone explain why? I tried doing a punnett square with the female being heterozygous and the male homozygous recessive but it didnt seem to work...
-KgkG-

laura_

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1341 on: September 25, 2019, 09:45:36 pm »
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Q. In domestic cats, when exploring crosses involving two fur colours (black and orange) the following observation is always made: A cross between an orange female and black male produces orange males and tortoiseshell shell female offspring. (Tortoiseshell is a mix of orange and black fur)
The most likely explanation for this is that the alleles for fur colour demonstrate?
A)sex- linkage
B)co-dominance
C)incomplete dominance
D) sex linkage and co - dominance

Guys for this question the answer is D but can someone explain why? I tried doing a punnett square with the female being heterozygous and the male homozygous recessive but it didnt seem to work...

Hey Kombmail!
I think that for this question, before you break out the Punnett Square, you can determine that this trait is certainly codominant, as a blending of the two alleles is shown (the tortoiseshell cats). This is different to incomplete dominance, which is where both alleles are shown (eg. a black and orange patchy/spotted cat). This leaves us with options B and D.

Now we need to ask, is it sex linked? When we are told that a trait is different in all females and all males (coming from the same parents), this is pretty clear evidence that it must be sex linked. However, we can also see that in a Punnet Square. We will start by assuming it is sexd linked and attempting to disprove it. The mother's genotype (if sex linked): XOXO. And the father: XBY.
Crossing these would produce males who inherit an XO from the mother and a Y from the father, and females with XO from the mother and XB from the father, which leads to the blended phenotype.

This means the answer must be D. Does that make sense?
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Kombmail

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1342 on: September 27, 2019, 10:15:35 am »
0
HSC BIOLOGY Q&A THREAD

To go straight to posts for the new syllabus, click here.

What is this thread for?
If you have general questions about the HSC Biology course or how to improve in certain areas, this is the place to ask! 👌

Hey dude! do you know how many treatments you should know for your chosen non- infectious disease in module 8?


Who can/will answer questions?
Everyone is welcome to contribute; even if you're unsure of yourself, providing different perspectives is incredibly valuable.

Please don't be dissuaded by the fact that you haven't finished Year 12, or didn't score as highly as others, or your advice contradicts something else you've seen on this thread, or whatever; none of this disqualifies you from helping others. And if you're worried you do have some sort of misconception, put it out there and someone else can clarify and modify your understanding! 

There'll be a whole bunch of other high-scoring students with their own wealths of wisdom to share with you. So you may even get multiple answers from different people offering their insights - very cool.


To ask a question or make a post, you will first need an ATAR Notes account. You probably already have one, but if you don't, it takes about four seconds to sign up - and completely free!

OTHER BIOLOGY RESOURCES

Original post.
Hello Bio Students, Whilst I may not be one of the ATARNotes legends, I noticed that there wasn't one of these threads in our section of the forums so I thought I'd start one up.

Basically this is a place where any of the Biology Students or Lecturers to come and place any questions that they need help with, or answered questions that you want marked or feedback on, or even just questions on the general concepts in Biology that you may need help with.

For me, I've done the core modules for Biology and I've gotten through a little bit of the Communications Option so feel free to ask me any questions regarding that. I'm currently first in my Biology class so I feel as though I can help some other people out, but feel free to prove me wrong and help others out with any questions. Looking forward to seeing these questions too

Let's get this thread rolling

Skidous
-KgkG-

Mia-lexa

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1343 on: October 03, 2019, 09:29:19 am »
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Hey, would anyone be able to explain to me metaphase I/anaphase I in meiosis - or more specifically just how homologous chromosomes work. I know that when they line up, it's the paternal and maternal copy of the same chromosome lining up, but I don't understand how this fits in with the whole scheme of things because fertilisation happens after this point, right? So how does one cell that is preparing for fertilisation already have the genetic material from both parents?

Thanks!

Karlamineeeee

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1344 on: October 03, 2019, 07:12:29 pm »
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Hi! I just had a question about the ATAR Notes Biology Topic Tests. For the Reproduction Test 1 Q7, could I make a table on sexual and asexual reproduction rather than internal/external fertilisation?

Thank you!!

InnererSchweinehund

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1345 on: October 04, 2019, 07:42:00 pm »
+1
Hey, would anyone be able to explain to me metaphase I/anaphase I in meiosis - or more specifically just how homologous chromosomes work. I know that when they line up, it's the paternal and maternal copy of the same chromosome lining up, but I don't understand how this fits in with the whole scheme of things because fertilisation happens after this point, right? So how does one cell that is preparing for fertilisation already have the genetic material from both parents?

Thanks!

Hi! This is a really good question!

Homologous chromosomes, as you correctly said, are one copy of each chromosome from the mother, and one copy of each chromosome from the father. They are similar in length but may have different alleles.

In females, meiosis occurs before birth, and in males in continually occurs after puberty. In both these cases, the male and the female already have the genetic material from their parents.

To make it a bit simpler, let's call the parents generation 1, and the child generation 2

Generation 1 are adults therefore they have all their genetic material
Generation 2 is created as a result of reproduction by generation 1. This means generation 2 has all their genetic material from their parents.
As generation 2 develops, their cells undergo meiosis giving them (generation 2) the capacity to create generation 3 once their bodies have matured to be able to do so as they now have their own gametes that can be fertilised.

It's quite a difficult concept to understand, but when you said, "how does one cell that is preparing for fertilisation already have the genetic material from both parents?" this cell 'preparing for fertilisation' is already inside a living organism created by reproduction, therefore they already have the genetic information from their parent.

Let me know if this still doesn't make sense!!
 :)


InnererSchweinehund

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1346 on: October 04, 2019, 07:46:25 pm »
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Hi! I just had a question about the ATAR Notes Biology Topic Tests. For the Reproduction Test 1 Q7, could I make a table on sexual and asexual reproduction rather than internal/external fertilisation?

Thank you!!

Hi Karlamineeeee,

If you could attach a picture of the specific question I would be more than happy to help you out!!!

In general (without seeing the question), if the question asks about internal/external fertilisation it is asking specifically about sexual reproduction, therefore it may not be appropriate to compare asexual and sexual reproduction (and it could potentially cost you some marks). 

If, however, the question is just asking you to compare different types of reproduction, it is definitely appropriate to use a table!!

 :D

Mia-lexa

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1347 on: October 04, 2019, 07:56:59 pm »
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Hi! This is a really good question!

Homologous chromosomes, as you correctly said, are one copy of each chromosome from the mother, and one copy of each chromosome from the father. They are similar in length but may have different alleles.

In females, meiosis occurs before birth, and in males in continually occurs after puberty. In both these cases, the male and the female already have the genetic material from their parents.

To make it a bit simpler, let's call the parents generation 1, and the child generation 2

Generation 1 are adults therefore they have all their genetic material
Generation 2 is created as a result of reproduction by generation 1. This means generation 2 has all their genetic material from their parents.
As generation 2 develops, their cells undergo meiosis giving them (generation 2) the capacity to create generation 3 once their bodies have matured to be able to do so as they now have their own gametes that can be fertilised.

It's quite a difficult concept to understand, but when you said, "how does one cell that is preparing for fertilisation already have the genetic material from both parents?" this cell 'preparing for fertilisation' is already inside a living organism created by reproduction, therefore they already have the genetic information from their parent.

Let me know if this still doesn't make sense!!
 :)

Ahhh thank you so much!! Makes a lot more sense now! :)

dani01

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1348 on: October 08, 2019, 09:57:34 pm »
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Hi does anyone have any info on a viral plant response all I am able to find is fungal! Would really appreciate some help. I can find the name and the pathogen but not the actual response if that makes sense  :P :P

InnererSchweinehund

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Re: HSC Biology Question Thread
« Reply #1349 on: October 14, 2019, 08:03:54 pm »
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Hi does anyone have any info on a viral plant response all I am able to find is fungal! Would really appreciate some help. I can find the name and the pathogen but not the actual response if that makes sense  :P :P

Hi there!

This is some information on viral pathogens and the response of an Australian plant from easyhsc.com.au

Hope this helps!

Turnip Mosaic Virus

Causative pathogen:
Turnip Mosaic Virus (TuMV), a potyvirus belonging to the family Potyviridae.

Host Range:
Almost all Brassica species and other plants including:
B. oleracea
B. campestris
B. juncea
B. pekinensis
Latuca sativa
Nasturtium officinale
Raphanus sativus

Symptoms:
Chlorotic spots on inoculated leaves
Mottling followed by systemic vein clearing
Mosaic and/or necrosis
Leaf distortion
Stunting

Management:
Exclusion or avoidance quarantine, growing crops in regions where the virus seldom occurs or during periods when the virus or its vector are at a low activity level and using virus-free seedling transplants.
Reduction in virus spreading sources controlling weeds and other virus hosts and insect vectors, destroying old crops promptly, separating new crops from maturing crops, and avoiding overlapping crops, particularly year-round cropping.
Protection of the host plant planting virus-resistant varieties, using barrier crops to reduce insect vector activity in the crop, using insecticides to protect plants, and using highly reflective mulches and oil sprays to deter insects.