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November 21, 2019, 02:16:30 am

Author Topic: English Standard Question Thread  (Read 81243 times)  Share 

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martinstran

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Re: English Standard Question Thread
« Reply #705 on: October 14, 2019, 10:18:01 pm »
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Thanks for the help Angelina! Sorry to bombard you with these last minute questions, but should I keep a related text in the back of my mind for the common module? I've heard from my teachers (and AN) that it's implied through the rubric that it isn't required in the HSC exam, but is it wise to brush up on things just in case?
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English (Standard) | Maths Extension 1/2 | Economics | Society and Culture | Studies of Religion I

angewina_naguen

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Re: English Standard Question Thread
« Reply #706 on: October 15, 2019, 07:29:56 am »
+1
Thanks for the help Angelina! Sorry to bombard you with these last minute questions, but should I keep a related text in the back of my mind for the common module? I've heard from my teachers (and AN) that it's implied through the rubric that it isn't required in the HSC exam, but is it wise to brush up on things just in case?

Hey, martinstran!

No worries about asking questions at all  :) That's what this thread here is for! The related text for Common Mod was only intended to be examined internally. I think this is due to it being something from the old syllabus that teachers weren't a huge fan of. So the short answer is no, it is very unlikely that it will be asked in the HSC!

That being said, you should have done your assessment for school using it so my recommendation would be to just briefly look over it. It might be a good way to revise the module concepts from the rubric if you have time. I would definitely still prioritise your prescribed text and short answers revision over it but if you do feel like it'll be beneficial to touch on it, do go ahead  :)

Angelina  ;D

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timothy333333

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Re: English Standard Question Thread
« Reply #707 on: October 15, 2019, 09:25:20 pm »
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Is there a difference between 'mise-en-scene' and 'background'?

Thank you :)

angewina_naguen

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Re: English Standard Question Thread
« Reply #708 on: October 15, 2019, 09:46:28 pm »
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Is there a difference between 'mise-en-scene' and 'background'?

Thank you :)

Hey, Timothy!

Background refers to all the visual elements of a composition (film or other visual text) that appear furthest away from the viewer. Mise-en-scene is different; it's more the design and arrangement of those visual elements in order to construct the "look and feel." Think of how the placement of certain objects, lighting, props, set design and choice of film stock all contribute to creating this atmosphere for the audience to immerse in. They essentially look at similar aspects of a scene but where background just describes the composition of elements in it, mise-en-scene captures the meanings that come out of deliberately choosing to situate them there. Hope that clarifies that!

Angelina  ;D

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timothy333333

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Re: English Standard Question Thread
« Reply #709 on: October 15, 2019, 10:33:35 pm »
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So is 'mise-en-scene' the meaning that the 'background' creates?

Also, from this, we would only talk about 'mise-en-scene' and not background?

Thank you for your help btw :)

alisontungmy

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Re: English Standard Question Thread
« Reply #710 on: October 15, 2019, 10:44:10 pm »
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Hello!
What is the biggest difference between a discursive and a creative/imaginative?
Everytime when I write a discursive I feel like I'm just writing a more descriptive, first person creative...
And for my trials I somehow get 17/20 when the question specifically asked for a creative, but I was writing something that was leaning more towards a discursive(in my opinion)  :-\
Thanks a lot!
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HSC 2019: Maths Ext.1, Maths Ext.2, Standard English, Music 2, Biology, Physics

angewina_naguen

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Re: English Standard Question Thread
« Reply #711 on: October 16, 2019, 12:13:34 am »
+1
So is 'mise-en-scene' the meaning that the 'background' creates?

Also, from this, we would only talk about 'mise-en-scene' and not background?

Thank you for your help btw :)

Hey, Timothy!

In a sense, yes  :) Here's how I would use it in an analysis!

Sample Answer
Arranged in the background are vases of wilted, assorted flowers, symbolising the protagonist's failed attempts to establish her identity. Combined with the clever use of dark filters, the mise-en-scene constructed invites the audience into a physical display that reflects the character's personal and cultural tension.

In a way, background to mise-en-scene is like setting in novels; it's more about the atmosphere. I would definitely use background as a technique on its own and then have mise-en-scene as an extension that shows how background (and what's placed in it) generates mood and meaning. Hope that clarifies that a bit better  :)

Hello!
What is the biggest difference between a discursive and a creative/imaginative?
Everytime when I write a discursive I feel like I'm just writing a more descriptive, first person creative...
And for my trials I somehow get 17/20 when the question specifically asked for a creative, but I was writing something that was leaning more towards a discursive(in my opinion)  :-\
Thanks a lot!

Hey, Alison!

Discursive writing is achieved from exploring an idea or ideas without the direct intention of persuading a reader to have a certain view. If you're drawing from personal experiences, using anecdotes and discussing an idea that emerges from those recollections, you're more than likely writing from a discursive standpoint! I often think creative writing is more fictitious and from personal experience, creative writing conceals the idea more amongst the activities of language in the text. For creative and imaginative pieces, I would draw more focus into setting, characterisation and plot, whereas discursive pieces tend to be more driven by perspectives, ideas and voice.

In the HSC exam, I don't think they will specify a form to write in so if you're feeling unsure and are asked to reflect on your writing, just refer to it by a title or as "the text" :) Hope that helps!

Angelina  ;D
« Last Edit: October 16, 2019, 12:00:35 pm by angewina_naguen »

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eliza.rose

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Re: English Standard Question Thread
« Reply #712 on: October 16, 2019, 04:57:18 pm »
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When answering short answer questions, what is an example of a conceptual statement? Like what do you write in your first sentence?

angewina_naguen

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Re: English Standard Question Thread
« Reply #713 on: October 16, 2019, 09:51:22 pm »
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When answering short answer questions, what is an example of a conceptual statement? Like what do you write in your first sentence?

Hey, eliza.rose!

Your conceptual statement is essentially your answer to the question. In it, you would include your judgement on how the unseen text represents an aspect of the human experience. Use the concept in the question as a means to drive it. If we look at this sample question "Analyse how language forms and features have been used to explore human motivations," your statement would need to include how human motivations are represented in the unseen text to generate meaning. An example of a conceptual statement could be something along the lines of "Exploring the complexity of an individual's motivations enables audiences to understand their relationships to human behaviour." You would then introduce the text and how it relates to that conceptual statement. Hope that helps!

Angelina  ;D

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