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Author Topic: A Vocabulary Bank for LA  (Read 13550 times)

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heids

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A Vocabulary Bank for LA
« on: February 22, 2016, 06:14:27 pm »
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(You can find more tips on the vocab and expression side of writing here, the original source of this vocab bank).

First... how to actually use these words

To challenge yourself to learn and use new words and build a good/high-quality/superior/better/outstanding/admirable/broad/excellent/varied/wonderful/wide-ranging/comprehensive vocabulary, try these steps!

1.  Write.  Write something, anything, language-analysis-y (we're going to give you heaps of opportunities!), and then go through your writing and list any 'problem' words - words that you commonly repeat, don't quite express what you wanted, or are vague and generic (e.g. 'good').

2.  Collect alternatives.  That's what this is for, and you can also Thesaurus it.  Build up a bank or mind-map of synonyms.

3.  Use them.  Create cue cards with a word you use too frequently on one side, and synonyms on the other; practise verbally coming up with as many synonyms as possible.   Practise writing the words in single sentences of analysis.  When writing essays, have the bank there and refer to it as you go, trying to incorporate new words.  Or, go over essays afterwards and replace weaker words with stronger ones from your bank.

4.  Rinse and repeat.  Often.  No, I don't mean 'write one full essay per two months'; I mean, small and often, because that's the only way to learn the words.  That's where this club comes in super handy ;)

5.  Check you're using them right.  It’s really easy to use new words thinking they mean something different, or trying to fit them incorrectly into the grammar.  We’re more than happy to give feedback in this board about this!

Verb Bank

You're not expected to know and use all these hundreds of verbs, but any time you find yourself overusing a verb when analysing language, check here for heaps of synonyms; build up your own shorter list with your personal favourites!

Verbs describing stuff the author does

Argue (the author argues that...)
•   contend
•   declare
•   assert
•   claim
•   aver
•   state
•   pronounce
•   allege
•   address
•   question
Advocate (the author advocates the idea that…)
•   advance
•   propagate
•   proclaim
•   promote
Suggest (the author suggests that…)
•   imply
•   hint
•   intimate
•   convey [the idea that]
•   insinuate
•   connote
Reject (the author rejects the view that…)
•   deny
•   repulse
•   repudiate
•   contradict
Undermine (the author undermines the opposition’s argument…)
•   refute
•   rebut
•   disprove
•   defeat [opposition/the view that…]
•   rout
•   conquer
•   destroy
•   dislodge
•   erode
•   weaken
•   demolish
•   shatter
•   crush
Attack/mock (the author attacks… >the opposition/the notion that<)
•   confront
•   criticise
•   condemn
•   denounce
•   accuse
•   blame
•   charge
•   censure
•   belittle
•   insult
•   downplay
•   disparage
•   undermine
•   denigrate
•   degrade
•   vilify
•   cast aspersions at
•   mock
•   deride
•   scorn
•   satirise
Praise (the author praises the idea that… / the author praises person X, who…)
•   admire
•   commend
•   extol
•   honour
•   acclaim
•   laud
Emphasise (the author emphasises that…)
•   stress
•   highlight
•   underscore
•   accentuate
•   reiterate
Support (the author supports this notion/his argument by…)
EXCELLENT for linking and showing how the argument works together and is strengthened/built up)
•   reinforce
•   substantiate
•   consolidate
•   corroborate
•   strengthen
•   fortify
•   give weight to
•   bolster
•   build on
•   compound
Use (the author uses >technique/phrase<…)
•   employ
•   utilise
Portray (the author portrays >something involved< as…)
•   depict
•   present
•   paint
•   demonstrate
•   show
•   characterise
•   illustrate
Attempt (the author attempts to…)
•   aim
•   endeavour
•   seek
•   strive
•   try

Verbs describing how the author impacts the audience

Persuade, positive (the author encourages the audience to…)
•   encourage
•   inspire
•   motivate
•   invite
•   stimulate
•   instil [a sense of/a desire to…]
•   attract
•   captivate
•   allure
•   entice
•   coax
Persuade, neutral (the author positions the audience to…)
•   position
•   prompt
•   sway
•   urge
•   convince
•   prevail (over/upon)
•   assure
•   incline
•   angle
Evoke (to evoke a… responses / to evoke a sense of…)
•   stimulate
•   elicit
•   provoke
•   arouse
•   kindle
•   ignite
•   create
•   generate
•   engender
•   produce
•   build
Manipulate (the author manipulates the reader to see… OR: the author manipulates the reader’s views…)
•   manoeuvre
•   channel
•   direct
•   steer
•   guide
•   control
•   convert
•   propel
Build (the author builds the reader’s >fear/emotion<…)
•   arouse
•   augment
•   increase
•   heighten
•   amplify
•   intensify
•   breed
•   generate
Alleviate (the author alleviates fear/doubt/pressure…)
•   relieve/provide relief
•   assure/reassure
•   allay
•   assuage
•   calm
•   quiet/quieten
Placate (the author placates the opposition/readers…)
•   appease
•   mollify
•   soothe
•   pacify
•   propitiate
•   conciliate
Shock (the author shocks the reader…)
•   startle
•   disturb
•   alarm
•   perturb
•   frighten
•   appal
•   daunt
•   dismay
•   terrify
•   agitate

Bank of linking words

Contrastingly
•   conversely
•   on the other hand
•   in opposition to
•   in contrast to
•   alternatively
Therefore
•   thus
•   hence
•   due to/because of
•   accordingly
•   consequently
•   as a result
•   inevitably
•   since/as/given that
•   ultimately
In addition
•   moreover
•   furthermore
•   further
•   subsequently
•   additionally
Yet
•   although/although/even though
•   despite
•   while/whilst
•   nonetheless
•   nevertheless

And, a cool variety of ways to start your sentences...

In case you’ve never heard, the examiners HATE formulaic responses.  A language analysis like this:
The author does this, which has this effect.  Then the author does this, which has this effect.  After that, the author does this, which has this effect.  Next the author does this, which has this effect.  Then the author does this, which has this effect. Finally, the author does this, which, you guessed it guys if you read this far, has this effect.
will not go down well.  It’s repetitive, boring, and doesn’t develop any interlinked big-picture understanding of the piece you’re analysing.  On the plus side, the rhythm is so repetitive that the examiner will be easily able to snore in time with it.

Here are some good ways to start:

*  The author [verb]s...
The author suggests that oranges are 'juicier' than apples, highlighting their thirst-quenching properties.
The author highlights the thirst-quenching properties of oranges, by presenting them as 'juicier' than apples.


*  [Verb]-ing, the author...
This is one is brilliant and really really important.
Highlighting their thirst-quenching properties, the author suggests that oranges are 'juicier' than apples.

*  Having..., the author then...
This one's good for linking your ideas and showing awareness of how the language builds to a cumulative effect.
Having highlighted the thirst-quenching properties of apples through labelling them as ‘juicier’, the author then reveals…

*  To/In an attempt to..., author...
To highlight the thirst-quenching properties of oranges, the author states that they are 'juicier' than apples.
In an attempt to make oranges appear healthier and more useful, the author highlights that they are 'juicier' than apples.


*  By/through [verb]ing..., author...
By/through suggesting that oranges are ‘juicier’ than apples, [author] highlights their thirst-quenching properties.

*  The author's [noun: usage/presentation/depiction/portrayal etc.] of... [verb]s...
Great because it forces you to analyse and discuss the effect.
The author’s depiction of oranges as ‘juicier’ than apples highlights their thirst-quenching properties.
   
*  This ___ [verb]s...
This use of comparative language reveals that...
VCE 2014: HHD, Bio, English, T&T, Methods

I love you, AN. Keep being cool. <3

FallingStar

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Re: A Vocabulary Bank for LA
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2016, 08:50:49 pm »
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Hi Heidi,

Do you have an alternatives for the word allow in the context of "allowing to reader to __________" I feel like I overuse this very much.

Thanks

literally lauren

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Re: A Vocabulary Bank for LA
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2016, 07:31:38 am »
+7
Hi Heidi,

Do you have an alternatives for the word allow in the context of "allowing to reader to __________" I feel like I overuse this very much.

Thanks
You could say:
'encouraging readers to...'
'engendering readers'...'
'compelling readers to...'
'prompting readers to...'
'coaxing readers to...'
'positioning readers to...'
'pressuring readers to...'
'urging readers to...'
'spurring readers to...'
'inciting readers to...'
'impelling readers to...'
'conditioning readers to...'

Hope that helps :)