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November 21, 2019, 06:08:53 pm

Author Topic: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!  (Read 163780 times)  Share 

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StupidProdigy

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #75 on: June 29, 2015, 09:20:07 pm »
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Distinguish between continuous and partial reinforcement with reference to a relevant example in a laboratory setting.

What does this question mean by lab setting and what could i perhaps do as an example? Thankyou :)
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yearningforsimplicity

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #76 on: June 30, 2015, 12:41:20 am »
+1
Distinguish between continuous and partial reinforcement with reference to a relevant example in a laboratory setting.

What does this question mean by lab setting and what could i perhaps do as an example? Thankyou :)

Continuous reinforcement means that you give the reinforcer every time the organism shows a correct/desired response. E.g. if a rat in an experiment presses the correct lever, it receives a food pellet EVERY TIME it makes that correct response. Continuous reinforcement is often used in the early stages of operant conditioning when the organism has to initially learn the relationship between a response and its consequence.

Once the organism has learnt the relationship between the operant response and its consequence (e.g. rat pressing lever and then realising that pressing a particular lever causes food to drop into its tray), we can adjust the reinforcement to a partial schedule of reinforcement. This means that we will provide the reinforcement for some of the desired/correct responses that the organism makes, but NOT ALL OF THEM. E.g. we might drop food pellets into the rat's tray the first 2 times it presses the correct lever, but not drop any pellets the 3rd, 4th and 5th time it presses that same lever (i.e. the other times it shows that same correct response). Partial schedules of reinforcement are good for maintaining (i.e. preventing extinction of) the desired/correct operant response (in this case, the rat pressing the correct lever).

Hope this makes sense! Schedules of reinforcement can get a bit confusing haha :D
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StupidProdigy

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #77 on: June 30, 2015, 01:23:08 pm »
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Continuous reinforcement means that you give the reinforcer every time the organism shows a correct/desired response. E.g. if a rat in an experiment presses the correct lever, it receives a food pellet EVERY TIME it makes that correct response. Continuous reinforcement is often used in the early stages of operant conditioning when the organism has to initially learn the relationship between a response and its consequence.

Once the organism has learnt the relationship between the operant response and its consequence (e.g. rat pressing lever and then realising that pressing a particular lever causes food to drop into its tray), we can adjust the reinforcement to a partial schedule of reinforcement. This means that we will provide the reinforcement for some of the desired/correct responses that the organism makes, but NOT ALL OF THEM. E.g. we might drop food pellets into the rat's tray the first 2 times it presses the correct lever, but not drop any pellets the 3rd, 4th and 5th time it presses that same lever (i.e. the other times it shows that same correct response). Partial schedules of reinforcement are good for maintaining (i.e. preventing extinction of) the desired/correct operant response (in this case, the rat pressing the correct lever).

Hope this makes sense! Schedules of reinforcement can get a bit confusing haha :D
Thanks for that :)
Understanding what they are isn't the problem, it's just what the lab example could be. When you were talking about rats was that your example of a lab setting experiment. Thanks again
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yearningforsimplicity

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #78 on: June 30, 2015, 06:30:35 pm »
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Thanks for that :)
Understanding what they are isn't the problem, it's just what the lab example could be. When you were talking about rats was that your example of a lab setting experiment. Thanks again


Yes that could be an example of a lab setting environment, as having a rat press a lever in a cage is a setting that an experimenter can control and modify to prompt a particular response from the rat :)
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PHEBCF

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #79 on: July 01, 2015, 07:36:11 pm »
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Hi for section c for the Psych exam if we were asked to write up a hypothesis would it have to be a research or experimental hypothesis? I'm also having a little trouble understanding plasticity including developmental and adaptive. Thanks!
« Last Edit: July 01, 2015, 07:45:23 pm by PHEBCF »

girl1234

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #80 on: July 08, 2015, 01:16:18 am »
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Hi for section c for the Psych exam if we were asked to write up a hypothesis would it have to be a research or experimental hypothesis? I'm also having a little trouble understanding plasticity including developmental and adaptive. Thanks!

Usually it would specify which hypothesis they want. (Generally it will be a research hypothesis, however know how to do both)
i did psych last year, so i don't know how i can best explain plasticity to you, but basically, plasticity is the brains ability to change due to learning/experience.
Developmental plasticity occurs generally in children as a response to environment stimuli. EG: the formation of the visual cortex.

Adaptive plasticity is the brains ability to compensate for a lost function (through injury) by changing the neural pathways in the brain (through rerouting and sprouting.) This occurs all throughout our lifespan, but is more effective in children. 

Hope this helped :D

Burt Macklin

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #81 on: July 09, 2015, 10:45:13 am »
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What aspects of classical conditioning are applied to graduated exposure and flooding?

maddihanna

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #82 on: July 09, 2015, 09:22:54 pm »
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I was just doing a past exam question and it asked about the difference between nightmares and night terrors, do we still have to know this? I believe there isn't a study design dot point on it but maybe it comes under the ASC of sleep? Would somebody be able to clear this up for me?

Thanks for your help! :)
« Last Edit: July 09, 2015, 09:30:37 pm by maddihanna »

Burt Macklin

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #83 on: July 09, 2015, 09:44:14 pm »
+1
I was just doing a past exam question and it asked about the difference between nightmares and night terrors, do we still have to know this? I believe there isn't a study design dot point on it but maybe it comes under the ASC of sleep? Would somebody be able to clear this up for me?

Thanks for your help! :)
I believe that because it's not on the study design, it's not examinable content. The only ASC you need to know in particular are day-dreaming and alcohol induced states (and sleep, obvs).

Although, I think we need another person to back this up -- I'm not 100% sure.

StupidProdigy

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #84 on: July 09, 2015, 10:16:01 pm »
+1
I was just doing a past exam question and it asked about the difference between nightmares and night terrors, do we still have to know this? I believe there isn't a study design dot point on it but maybe it comes under the ASC of sleep? Would somebody be able to clear this up for me?

Thanks for your help! :)
It was on the old study design, don't need to know it
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thaoot

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #85 on: August 03, 2015, 05:05:25 pm »
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Hi there, just wanted to ask, which is most effective out of fixed-ratio, fixed-interval, variable-ratio and variable-interval reinforcements and why? Thank you!
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I am a unicorn

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #86 on: August 03, 2015, 10:01:40 pm »
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Hi there, just wanted to ask, which is most effective out of fixed-ratio, fixed-interval, variable-ratio and variable-interval reinforcements and why? Thank you!

Variable ratio has the highest response rate (and hence can be considered the most effective) because the individual is unaware of when they will be reinforced, and therefore puts in the same amount of effort in each time
If you have a look at your textbook (pg 437 of Grivas book) there is a really good graph that shows the response rate (or just google it :) )
« Last Edit: August 06, 2015, 11:22:36 am by I am a unicorn »
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I am a unicorn

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #87 on: August 03, 2015, 10:06:20 pm »
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Hello :)
I'm a little confused about the order of the elements of observational learning... I've been taught the order of elements for observational learning are: attention, retention, reproduction, motivation and reinforcement.
but, it seems to make more sense to me if motivation was at the very beginning (I.e. You have to be motivated first in order to give attention, etc.).
Why is motivation not at the beginning?

Thanks :)
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anat0my

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #88 on: August 03, 2015, 10:14:00 pm »
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Hello :)
I'm a little confused about the order of the elements of observational learning... I've been taught the order of elements for observational learning are: attention, retention, reproduction, motivation and reinforcement.
but, it seems to make more sense to me if motivation was at the very beginning (I.e. You have to be motivated first in order to give attention, etc.).
Why is motivation not at the beginning?

Thanks :)

Just my two cents- someone please correct me or provide a more comprehensive answer.

Basically motivation is included in attention which is the first step. I.e you need to be motivated to focus on key features of a models actions. This is different to motivation which comes last next to reinforcement. In this stage, motivation refers to the willingness to *perform* the learnt behaviour.

I hope that helps to some degree. Check our andrew Scott's youtube videos for psych- he explains it well. :)

StupidProdigy

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Re: Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #89 on: August 15, 2015, 08:16:30 pm »
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Not completely related to vce psych, but I came across a thing called enantiostasis, the definition looked quite similar to allostasis, does anyone know any major differences between the two??
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