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October 22, 2020, 05:57:46 pm

Author Topic: VCE Psychology Question Thread!  (Read 226126 times)  Share 

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Coolgalbornin03Lo

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1710 on: September 26, 2020, 11:14:19 am »
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Is flashbulb memory in the course? Unit 3/4 ive come across it in a NEAP exam and I’ve never heard of it.
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lm21074

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1711 on: September 26, 2020, 08:30:04 pm »
+1
Is flashbulb memory in the course? Unit 3/4 ive come across it in a NEAP exam and I’ve never heard of it.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I think this concept was part of the old study design.

I've just had a look and flashbulb memories are touched on quite briefly in the textbook I have (Jacaranda). They come under the brain regions involved in the storage of long-term memories, specifically under the role of the amygdala, but I haven't seen the concept anywhere besides the textbook, the NEAP exam you're referring to and the 2007 VCAA Exam 2. It is probably worth knowing just in case it pops up on the exam.

Quote from: Jacaranda paraphrased
A flashbulb memory is basically a type of explicit episodic memory - a vivid and highly detailed memory of the circumstances in which someone first learns of a very surprising, significant or emotionally arousing event.

If you have a textbook other than Jacaranda, does it appear in your textbook?


« Last Edit: September 26, 2020, 10:35:12 pm by lm21074 »

scientificllama

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1712 on: September 26, 2020, 10:29:39 pm »
+2
If you have a textbook other than Jacaranda, does it appear in your textbook?

I use the Cambridge book, it is also covered quite briefly; however, I recommend just knowing what it in case it does pop up on the exam :)
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amanaazim

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1713 on: September 27, 2020, 11:04:23 am »
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Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I think this concept was part of the old study design.

I've just had a look and flashbulb memories are touched on quite briefly in the textbook I have (Jacaranda). They come under the brain regions involved in the storage of long-term memories, specifically under the role of the amygdala, but I haven't seen the concept anywhere besides the textbook, the NEAP exam you're referring to and the 2007 VCAA Exam 2. It is probably worth knowing just in case it pops up on the exam.




no for nelson psychology unit 3/4 flashbulb memory does not come up
If you have a textbook other than Jacaranda, does it appear in your textbook?

amanaazim

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1714 on: September 27, 2020, 11:25:37 am »
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hey so basically i am a bit confused on the Lazarus and Folkman model , first of all do we have to write the whole name in our exam cause its quite long.

And secondly, while i was doing a question,(down below) it says describe 2 different primary appraisals Maddie might have when she is stressed. So in like the atar notes summary notes and even at school and the nelson textbook , it showcases that first a person thinks that if the situation is : irrelevant, benign-positive or stressful. Then in the situation if the person appraises it as stressful, then they think that the situation is a : harm/loss, threat or a challenge. So in this scenario when it asks for 2 different primary appraisals or any question  how do i know that should i use the irrelevant, benign-positive or stressful one or the harm/loss, threat and challenge appraisal one because they both come under primary appraisal.


the scenario question 1

Maddie, a university student, became stressed when she lost her part-time job. With reference to the Lazarus and Folkman's Transactional model of stress and coping, describe two different primary appraisals that Maddie might have made when she became stressed (2 marks)

the scenario question 2

Stella is 17 years old and undertaking VCE. Stella is feeling overwhelmed by what year 12 involves and has had difficulty sleeping during the school term. Her friend Audrey, however is enjoying Year 12 and is finding the SAC's challenging but manageable.

In terms of primary appraisal in Lazarus and Folkamn's Transactional Model of Stress and Coping, explain why Stella and Audrey have evaluated their situations differently (4 marks)

- so for this question i wrote that stella has appraised the situation as stressful and audrey has appraised the situation as benign-positive. But when i checked the marking guide on checkpoints it said that stella appraised the situation as a threat and Audrey appraised the situation as a challenge. Why is that the case i am confused?

wasabi

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1715 on: September 27, 2020, 12:00:30 pm »
+4
hey so basically i am a bit confused on the Lazarus and Folkman model

Hey amanaazim,

I believe when we get asked about primary appraisals, it only relates to harm/loss, threat or challenge. This is because an individual has perceived the stressor as stressful to come to this next stage. If the individual perceived it as benign-positive or irrelevant, the next step would not occur.

Therefore, the first question would be asking you two possible appraisals, out of harm/loss, threat and challenge. The second question is asking which category each girl appraised it as - threat and challenge as per the answer.
Stella is 17 years old and undertaking VCE. Stella is feeling overwhelmed by what year 12 involves and has had difficulty sleeping during the school term. Her friend Audrey, however is enjoying Year 12 and is finding the SAC's challenging but manageable.

It states that Audrey is finding SAC's challenging but manageable - so she has appraised it as a challenging stress.

Hope this helped!
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Coolgalbornin03Lo

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1716 on: September 28, 2020, 11:10:01 pm »
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Is it wrong to say that adreneline activates the amygdala? I’ve tried googling it but the NEAP 2018 exam says adreneline activates release of noraadreneline into the bloodstream which activates the amygdala?

By VCE standards which is correct?
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tiredandstressed

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1717 on: September 28, 2020, 11:13:04 pm »
+2
Is it wrong to say that adreneline activates the amygdala? I’ve tried googling it but the NEAP 2018 exam says adreneline activates release of noraadreneline into the bloodstream which activates the amygdala?

By VCE standards which is correct?
Yes this is a very unclear concept to be fair I am not sure how strict VCCA is
However i think it would be safe to say
adrenaline -> noradernaline -> amygdala
Other sources will argue that both are released simultaneously
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scientificllama

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1718 on: September 30, 2020, 01:25:26 pm »
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Dumb question, can declarative memory and explicit memory be used interchangeably or are they 2 separate elements?
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Evolio

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1719 on: September 30, 2020, 01:39:05 pm »
+3
Hi scientificllama.

Well, declarative memory is referring to explicit memory but declarative memory is more a descriptive term to describe explicit memory. I would say they are separate terms. So, these terms shouldn't be used interchangeably. However, you should use the term explicit memory in your responses to questions rather than 'declarative memory' as 'declarative memory' means information from long-term memory that can be stated while 'explicit' memory is actually referring to memories that require conscious awareness when being recalled.

EDIT: Chocolatepistachio beat me to it but I'll just leave this here.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2020, 07:38:17 pm by Evolio »
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tiredandstressed

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1720 on: September 30, 2020, 04:01:02 pm »
+1
Hi scientificllama.

Well, declaritive memory is referring to explicit memory but declaritive memory is more a descriptive term to describe explicit memory. I would say they are separate terms. So, these terms shouldn't be used interchangeably. However, you should use the term explicit memory in your responses to questions rather than 'declaritive memory' as 'declaritive memory' means information from long-term memory that can be stated while 'explicit' memory is actually referring to memories that require conscious awareness when being recalled.

EDIT: Chocolatepistachio beat me to it but I'll just leave this here.

Good point, in the scope of VCE psych this is not a big deal, if anyone of you decides to study psych in uni you will actually  learn there is a difference (against this is beyond the scope of the VCE study design)
But psychologists use the term 'explicit' and 'implicit' when they are testing the retrieval mechanisms of declarative memory.
Again, this is not important and you do not need to be aware of the difference, this is solely for interest.
Explicit test: for decorative memory
Implicit test: for non-declarative memory
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Coolgalbornin03Lo

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1721 on: September 30, 2020, 04:18:25 pm »
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Something in exam just way confused me:

I always thought validity was referring to whether the experiment was testing what it was supposed to be testing (the effect on IV of DV). But then the solutions of NEAP exam said it’s actually testing whether the tools work?
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tiredandstressed

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1722 on: September 30, 2020, 06:11:27 pm »
+3
Something in exam just way confused me:

I always thought validity was referring to whether the experiment was testing what it was supposed to be testing (the effect on IV of DV). But then the solutions of NEAP exam said it’s actually testing whether the tools work?
Reliability: extent to which results is obtained from a research study are consistent, dependable and stable
Validity: extent to which the procedures used for research measure what the research intended to measure
Internal validity: extent to which results obtained from a study are actually due to variable(s) that was measured and not due to an extraneous variable
External validity: extent to which the results obtained from the study can be generalised to the population of research interest

So you're not wrong, but the way we can deduce if the experiment tests what it was supposed to is by evaluating the procedure :)
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amanaazim

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1723 on: September 30, 2020, 07:17:08 pm »
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For this question can it also be eustress cause running is a fun activity . And it is not a negative psychological response to a stressor


MCQ Question: 

Just before he races, Indra gets butterflies in his stomach. He reports feeling anxious and stressed before a big race. This is most likely an example of

Option A - an anxiety disorder
Option B - distress
Option C - chronic stress
Option D - eustress

Evolio

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Re: VCE Psychology Question Thread!
« Reply #1724 on: September 30, 2020, 07:24:00 pm »
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Hey amanaazim

It would be good to look at the key words in the question. These key words are 'anxious' and 'stressed', where specifically anxious is related to worry, unneasiness or apprehension about something about to happen: the race in this case. So, it would be 'distress' as distress is a negative psychological response to a stressor. Distress would be the best answer.

It wouldn't be eustress because the question makes no reference to positive psychological states (for example, excitement).

Hope this helps.
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