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December 06, 2019, 11:05:44 am

Author Topic: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!  (Read 165743 times)  Share 

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peter.g15

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1395 on: February 17, 2019, 08:40:43 pm »
+1
Got it! So, to sum up:
The PNS carries afferent information to the CNS, where it is processed. This afferent information may include a variety of visual, tactile, auditory, etc., information, so the CNS has to integrate, or make sense of, the information. For example, the brain may receive an abundance of visual, tactile, and auditory information that tells you there's an angry, barking dog near you. The brain will then be responsible for co-ordinating a response to the stimulus, such as activating the sympathetic nervous system if the dog is perceived as a threat.

Is this all good?

Thank you for the help!

Yep, that's a great summary! :)
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StaticZ1011

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1396 on: February 18, 2019, 08:37:19 pm »
0
What primarily determines whether or not a neurotransmitter will have an excitatory or inhibitory effects?

peter.g15

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1397 on: February 18, 2019, 10:20:36 pm »
+3
What primarily determines whether or not a neurotransmitter will have an excitatory or inhibitory effects?

Hi!

I don't believe you are required to know why certain neurotransmitters are excitatory or inhibitory - that's more related to the biochemistry of human physiology (outside of the scope of the course). The main thing that you need to know is the glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter and GABA is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter.
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whys

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1398 on: February 25, 2019, 09:54:49 pm »
+1
Some questions:
- Can every type of stressor be cateogorised into the different sources of stress? Like for example, would the time someone waits before going on a rollercoaster for the first time be a daily pressure?

Can every difference source of stress be acute, chronic, internal, external, physical and psychological? For example, what is an example of a chronic daily pressure? Or an internal catastrophe/major event?

When your heart beats faster, is that controlled by stress hormones? (so neurotransmitters have nothing to do with that?)

If you choose to fight or flight (run away) after freezing, isn't that counted as a voluntary decision? Because you assess the situation then choose which one to do, however in the textbook it says it occurs after freeze response as part of the fight-flight-freeze response.

Thanks :)
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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1399 on: February 27, 2019, 10:36:34 am »
+4
Some questions:
- Can every type of stressor be cateogorised into the different sources of stress? Like for example, would the time someone waits before going on a rollercoaster for the first time be a daily pressure?

Can every difference source of stress be acute, chronic, internal, external, physical and psychological? For example, what is an example of a chronic daily pressure? Or an internal catastrophe/major event?

When your heart beats faster, is that controlled by stress hormones? (so neurotransmitters have nothing to do with that?)

If you choose to fight or flight (run away) after freezing, isn't that counted as a voluntary decision? Because you assess the situation then choose which one to do, however in the textbook it says it occurs after freeze response as part of the fight-flight-freeze response.

Thanks :)
I would say that daily pressure is the most appropriate descriptor for the source of stress when waiting for a rollercoaster (albeit a relatively rare when compared to something like losing your keys).

It wouldn't be categorised as a life event, as there isn't the long-term adjustment required after, it would only be classified as acculturative if the question specifically linked this to change in culture (eg finding it difficult to read rules for sign about ride due to not being fluent in English causing stress about the ride), and it's not really of high enough magnitude/impact to be a major stressor. I can't think of any examples that can't be grouped into one of these categories, but I'll look it up and see what I find


The accumulation of daily hassles contributes to chronic stress, but I can't think of how a catastrophe could be internal since catastrophes affect many people at once and are out of their control.

When your heart beats faster, this is related to the sympathetic nervous system being dominant and does involve neurotransmitters. Stress hormones do play a role in this too, but they aren't working independently.

In FFF, the body preparing for the possibility of fight-or-flight is involuntary, and in freeze there's involuntary immobility, however the actual actions of running or fighting would be voluntary -  the mechanisms which prepare you for that aren't, which might be what the textbook is reffering too.

It's also worth noting that fight or flight can occur without freezing

Hope this clears things up :)


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whys

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1400 on: February 27, 2019, 11:39:25 am »
0
I would say that daily pressure is the most appropriate descriptor for the source of stress when waiting for a rollercoaster (albeit a relatively rare when compared to something like losing your keys).

It wouldn't be categorised as a life event, as there isn't the long-term adjustment required after, it would only be classified as acculturative if the question specifically linked this to change in culture (eg finding it difficult to read rules for sign about ride due to not being fluent in English causing stress about the ride), and it's not really of high enough magnitude/impact to be a major stressor. I can't think of any examples that can't be grouped into one of these categories, but I'll look it up and see what I find


The accumulation of daily hassles contributes to chronic stress, but I can't think of how a catastrophe could be internal since catastrophes affect many people at once and are out of their control.

When your heart beats faster, this is related to the sympathetic nervous system being dominant and does involve neurotransmitters. Stress hormones do play a role in this too, but they aren't working independently.

In FFF, the body preparing for the possibility of fight-or-flight is involuntary, and in freeze there's involuntary immobility, however the actual actions of running or fighting would be voluntary -  the mechanisms which prepare you for that aren't, which might be what the textbook is reffering too.

It's also worth noting that fight or flight can occur without freezing

Hope this clears things up :)

Thanks so much!
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InnocentKid

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1401 on: February 27, 2019, 07:27:54 pm »
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hey can u guys and girls help me with this question

" Distinguish between a stressor and stress with reference to an example"

thanks ;D

Erutepa

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1402 on: February 27, 2019, 07:38:28 pm »
+3
hey can u guys and girls help me with this question

" Distinguish between a stressor and stress with reference to an example"

thanks ;D
Stress is the state of psychobiological arousal as a result of exposure to a stressor.

So the stressor is a stimulus (a thing/event/situation) and stress is a response to a stressor

You might want to use an example such as seeing a snake, where the snake is the stressor and the sudden alertness and increased heart rate are features of the stress response due to that stressor.

Hope this helps
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InnocentKid

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1403 on: February 27, 2019, 07:46:04 pm »
0
Stress is the state of psychobiological arousal as a result of exposure to a stressor.

So the stressor is a stimulus (a thing/event/situation) and stress is a response to a stressor

You might want to use an example such as seeing a snake, where the snake is the stressor and the sudden alertness and increased heart rate are features of the stress response due to that stressor.

Hope this helps

 ;D thanks  ;D

InnocentKid

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1404 on: February 27, 2019, 08:00:43 pm »
0
could I use this example


"for example when an individual  see's  a large dog which is the stressor, this  may cause the certain individual to go through a state of physiological or psychological tension,  this is the form of stress. This concludes in  the individual's heart rate and breathing to increase as a result of the stress'

as that good....feel free too reword or restructure the sentence...thanks  ;)

whys

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1405 on: February 27, 2019, 08:09:23 pm »
+3
could I use this example


"for example when an individual  see's  a large dog which is the stressor, this  may cause the certain individual to go through a state of physiological or psychological tension,  this is the form of stress. This concludes in  the individual's heart rate and breathing to increase as a result of the stress'

as that good....feel free too reword or restructure the sentence...thanks  ;)

I'm assuming you'd need something like this to get full marks for this question:
A stressor is a stimulus that causes or produces stress and challenges coping ability, whereas stress is the state of physiological and psychological arousal produced by internal or external stressors that are perceived by the individual as challenging or exceeding their ability or resources to cope. For example, when an individual sees large dog running towards them, they perceive this dog as the stressor, as it is the stimulus that causes the individual to feel stress. The individual may perceive the dog as being scary and that the dog could potentially harm them - this perception is the stress. The stress response in this situation is increased heart rate and respiration rate, and divertion of energy to systems that are required for immediate survival, caused by activation of the sympathetic nervous system. (alteratively, you could mention the fight-flight-freeze response as the stress response too)

edit; corrected a silly mistake (parasympathetic to sympathetic)
« Last Edit: February 27, 2019, 08:56:02 pm by whys »
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InnocentKid

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1406 on: February 27, 2019, 08:19:44 pm »
0
I'm assuming you'd need something like this to get full marks for this question:
A stressor is a stimulus that causes or produces stress and challenges coping ability, whereas stress is the state of physiological and psychological arousal produced by internal or external stressors that are perceived by the individual as challenging or exceeding their ability or resources to cope. For example, when an individual sees large dog running towards them, they perceive this dog as the stressor, as it is the stimulus that causes the individual to feel stress. The individual may perceive the dog as being scary and that the dog could potentially harm them - this perception is the stress. The stress response in this situation is increased heart rate and respiration rate, and divertion of energy to systems that are required for immediate survival, caused by activation of the parasympathetic nervous system. (alteratively, you could mention the fight-flight-freeze response as the stress response too)

aye what an amazing answer
that's an exam response right there!!!
thanks for all the help and good luck with psych

also how do I give u respect...u deserve it

Erutepa

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1407 on: February 27, 2019, 08:35:45 pm »
+1
I'm assuming you'd need something like this to get full marks for this question:
A stressor is a stimulus that causes or produces stress and challenges coping ability, whereas stress is the state of physiological and psychological arousal produced by internal or external stressors that are perceived by the individual as challenging or exceeding their ability or resources to cope. For example, when an individual sees large dog running towards them, they perceive this dog as the stressor, as it is the stimulus that causes the individual to feel stress. The individual may perceive the dog as being scary and that the dog could potentially harm them - this perception is the stress. The stress response in this situation is increased heart rate and respiration rate, and divertion of energy to systems that are required for immediate survival, caused by activation of the parasympathetic nervous system. (alteratively, you could mention the fight-flight-freeze response as the stress response too)
Just a small correction.
These stress responses you mention are a result of the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, not the parasympathetic.
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whys

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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1408 on: February 27, 2019, 08:56:54 pm »
+1
Just a small correction.
These stress responses you mention are a result of the activation of the sympathetic nervous system, not the parasympathetic.

Iím glad you noticed!! Ugh these silly mistakes will be the main reason I lose marks in sacs lol
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Re: VCE Psychology 3/4 Question Thread!
« Reply #1409 on: March 03, 2019, 09:53:28 am »
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Hi guys.
This is Psycholgy Unit 1 stuff.
But I was wondering is fmri and PET  have info on structure and function or only function, like both of them?

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