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January 29, 2020, 03:37:36 am

Author Topic: VCE English Question Thread  (Read 405166 times)  Share 

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izzywantsa97

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #225 on: March 08, 2015, 06:51:39 pm »
+1
With Text response, it seems as though when they give two prompts for a text, that one prompt is harder than the other- would the prompt difficulty have any influence on their marking scheme? Also, for analysis prompts (going by these categories http://www.vcestudyguides.com/types-of-essay-topics) I've been told that my essays for these types of prompts are almost too analytical and explicit in my analysis that it sounds more like a Language Analysis (e.g. "Through the author's use of the metaphor, (insert metaphor here), he/she exemplifies to readers the importance of ___). Do you have any tips on how to more subtly talk about what the author does to convey a certain meaning? Apparently I needed to focus more on the readers concerns and values rather than the language used to show what she is concerned about.

My teacher is a VCE marker and she says that they do take into consideration sometimes that some essay topics are harder! And for using metalanguage, generally start with the idea and then how the writer demonstrates it, and end with why the writer wants to send this message to the reader and the effect :)
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appleandbee

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #226 on: March 08, 2015, 07:01:42 pm »
0
If I'm doing a feature article for context, for the audience section is it enough to say 'readers of The Age' etc.? On that note, what kind of newspaper/magazine would it be appropriate to have a moderately sophisticated feature article (but with a couple of current/societal examples) focusing on 'how illusions/dreams/ feeling/internal self affect the way one perceives reality'?
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thaaanyan

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #227 on: March 08, 2015, 09:13:10 pm »
+2
If I'm doing a feature article for context, for the audience section is it enough to say 'readers of The Age' etc.? On that note, what kind of newspaper/magazine would it be appropriate to have a moderately sophisticated feature article (but with a couple of current/societal examples) focusing on 'how illusions/dreams/ feeling/internal self affect the way one perceives reality'?

is this for your statement of intention????
often i'd suggest adding more depth than "readers of the age," you could still say that but then maybe follow up with something like "who have an interest in understanding the working nature of the realities and the illusions which constitute our identity and also professors of philosophy who wish to enhance their understanding regarding reality as a blah blah" (or something like that) the way i always figure is that if you add in the secondary specification you can also talk about how the language you use impacts your exact specific audience like "complex and jargonistic language in order to appeal to the academic nature of the reader's....."
if you need a magazine i'd make up one; eg. "The Science of Reality" a magazine which looks at the fabric of the universe around us through a rational lens and aims to both morally and scientifically quantify the essence/meaning of reality. totally fine to do that in context.

if i have totally misinterpreted what you're saying please ignore me haha. but yeah hope i helped! goodluck :)

Burt Macklin

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #228 on: March 09, 2015, 09:42:44 pm »
0
Hi Lauren - again,

So I've figured out why I'm taking so much time (mostly because of running out of ideas/examples and inefficient brainstorming). I'm in the process of collecting more examples but am not too sure on what exactly I should do.

I've been providing some general overviews on examples, but I seem to have trouble relating them to ideas. I dunno, I feel like they aren't complex enough??  :-X Like I'm not going deep enough with the ideas?

(e.g. for Malala Youfazai - I've related her and the events associated with her to: culture and religion causing conflict, individuals showing courage and bravery amidst/after conflict, "positive" consequences)

Can you give an example of how to extrapolate ideas out of examples well?


literally lauren

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #229 on: March 09, 2015, 11:49:19 pm »
+3
With Text response, it seems as though when they give two prompts for a text, that one prompt is harder than the other- would the prompt difficulty have any influence on their marking scheme? Also, for analysis prompts (going by these categories http://www.vcestudyguides.com/types-of-essay-topics) I've been told that my essays for these types of prompts are almost too analytical and explicit in my analysis that it sounds more like a Language Analysis (e.g. "Through the author's use of the metaphor, (insert metaphor here), he/she exemplifies to readers the importance of ___). Do you have any tips on how to more subtly talk about what the author does to convey a certain meaning? Apparently I needed to focus more on the readers concerns and values rather than the language used to show what she is concerned about.
The difficulty of prompts is a matter of preference. Although some are objectively simple or difficult, VCAA are quite good at disguising things. Often a short, to-the-point statement can have a whole lot of hidden implications, while a complex looking structural prompt with an embedded quote or some difficult vocab can actually be boiled down to a very straightforward question. For 'analysis' type questions, you'll pretty much just have to transition between close textual evidence (structural features, language, meta-devices, that sort of thing) and the wider text's messages.
I suppose the best way to force yourself into this is to use the format of the question. Structural ones will usually begin with 'How...' as in 'How does the author's use of X create a sense of Y?' Occasionally some part of the equation will be missing and you'll have to fill in the blanks, eg. 'Discuss the author's use of X' or 'How does the author create Y?'
It all comes down to two questions though: if you've made a statement about the text, how do you know, and why is this important?

eg. Starting point: The character of Marlin in 'Finding Nemo' is initially unsympathetic.
How do I know: He's portrayed as an overbearing, didactic parent who does not allow his son to explore and grow, as is exemplified through the juxtaposition of Nemo with his more liberated peers. (--> seahorse, that other fish... a pink octopus I think?)
Why is this significant: This early representation serves as a contrast to the Marlin we see at the end of the film, thereby highlighting the importance of trusting one's child in order to be a cautious parent, but not overly so.


With a comparative language analysis piece, what structure would you suggest to write with? Some teachers say analyse them as completely separate pieces (Eg: Analyse the first article on its own, then analyse the second comparing/contrasting to the first) whilst another teacher told me to compare/contrast in the same paragraph
What should i do?
For your SAC, do whatever your teacher wants :)
For the exam, (and if your teacher is open to whatever method you prefer) I'd advocate the key player approach (explanation in the first page in this thread if you need.) Simply put, each paragraph focuses on a key idea or argument that the author uses to manipulate the audience. This allows you to transition between each article with ease, provided that's something your teacher is looking for.

So long as you're analysing language, you're in the clear. So comparing the articles isn't technically a part of the criteria; you could simply write a paragraph on each and be fine. It all depends on how fussy your teacher is.

When starting essays with a quote, what is the maximum length of the quote? For example is this quote " conflict is the gadfly of thought, it stirs us to observation and memory. It shocks us out of sheeplike passivity and sets us at noting and contriving" too long to put at the start of an essay?

There are no strict rules for Context essays, so the quote can be as long as you need. That one seems perfectly fine; it'd only be a problem if you were quoting more than three or four sentences. Even then, it's a writing task, not an 'essay' per se. If you want to intersperse your essay with multiple quotes, you can do that too. Just don't make the quotes do the work for you - your own exploration is what the assessors want to see :)

If I'm doing a feature article for context, for the audience section is it enough to say 'readers of The Age' etc.? On that note, what kind of newspaper/magazine would it be appropriate to have a moderately sophisticated feature article (but with a couple of current/societal examples) focusing on 'how illusions/dreams/ feeling/internal self affect the way one perceives reality'?

Assuming this is for your Statement of Intention (?) I guess that should suffice. Mind you, my teacher was pretty chill with the Statement thing, we were just told to write something valid so he could tick it off. However, I know some schools give more credence to the SOI, so it's probably worth checking with your teacher.

If you're looking for a precise publication that you could use, The Age or The Australian would be fine. You could always browse a few major online/print companies until you find one that writes the kind of pieces you're emulating. That would probably help you refine your writing style as well as give you some idea of the format and structural specifics :)

Hi Lauren - again,

So I've figured out why I'm taking so much time (mostly because of running out of ideas/examples and inefficient brainstorming). I'm in the process of collecting more examples but am not too sure on what exactly I should do.

I've been providing some general overviews on examples, but I seem to have trouble relating them to ideas. I dunno, I feel like they aren't complex enough??  :-X Like I'm not going deep enough with the ideas?

(e.g. for Malala Youfazai - I've related her and the events associated with her to: culture and religion causing conflict, individuals showing courage and bravery amidst/after conflict, "positive" consequences)

Can you give an example of how to extrapolate ideas out of examples well?
If that's the case, then make your brainstorming/notes better before attempting essays. It's perfectly fine, especially at this stage of the year, to need a whole heap of exploration for your evidence. In the exam, it'll probably be enough for you to scribble 'Malala,' 'Aztecs' and 'Spiderman' just to jog your memory.

For now though, spend some time unpacking things.
So that you know what you should be relating these ideas to, it's also probably worth going through a list of prompts and finding key thematic areas (eg. causes of conflict, how people's responses to conflict differ, why conflict can unite or divide people, etc.) That way, when you're thinking about your evidence, you'll know what parts of it are most significant.

Most of the research you do for your examples will just be a means of familiarising yourself until you're confident discussing it. In your essay, you'll just be giving your reader whatever is relevant to your discussion, so you should always know a little bit more than what you're writing.

There's also a chance that you're not choosing the right examples. Some are inherently less complex and relatable, which is not to say that you can't use them, but rather that it's better you leave these ones for later in the year after you're comfortable with how evidence integration and Context pieces work.

Try and broaden your discussion as much as possible, and then hopefully things will start to make more sense as you go :)

chansena

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #230 on: March 10, 2015, 05:41:04 pm »
0
Hi ALL!

For context I am looking at writing a Feature Article, and think through a feature article it will allow me to explore context more. But i do not have an example piece. Could someone please post/ PM an example piece of a feature article preferably identity and belonging (but i don't mind if its anything else too ) I just need an example at the moment so i can use it as a guide. :)

Thanks


 
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Eiffel

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #231 on: March 10, 2015, 05:47:17 pm »
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honestly speaking, if you get 50% on a sac are your chances of 50 gone? lets assume the class overall did well (say 80% ave)

Splash-Tackle-Flail

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #232 on: March 10, 2015, 07:20:38 pm »
0
The difficulty of prompts is a matter of preference. Although some are objectively simple or difficult, VCAA are quite good at disguising things. Often a short, to-the-point statement can have a whole lot of hidden implications, while a complex looking structural prompt with an embedded quote or some difficult vocab can actually be boiled down to a very straightforward question. For 'analysis' type questions, you'll pretty much just have to transition between close textual evidence (structural features, language, meta-devices, that sort of thing) and the wider text's messages.
I suppose the best way to force yourself into this is to use the format of the question. Structural ones will usually begin with 'How...' as in 'How does the author's use of X create a sense of Y?' Occasionally some part of the equation will be missing and you'll have to fill in the blanks, eg. 'Discuss the author's use of X' or 'How does the author create Y?'
It all comes down to two questions though: if you've made a statement about the text, how do you know, and why is this important?

eg. Starting point: The character of Marlin in 'Finding Nemo' is initially unsympathetic.
How do I know: He's portrayed as an overbearing, didactic parent who does not allow his son to explore and grow, as is exemplified through the juxtaposition of Nemo with his more liberated peers. (--> seahorse, that other fish... a pink octopus I think?)
Why is this significant: This early representation serves as a contrast to the Marlin we see at the end of the film, thereby highlighting the importance of trusting one's child in order to be a cautious parent, but not overly so.


Thank you so much! loved the example hah!
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literally lauren

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #233 on: March 10, 2015, 09:53:51 pm »
+1
honestly speaking, if you get 50% on a sac are your chances of 50 gone? lets assume the class overall did well (say 80% ave)
Honestly speaking, I have no earthly clue what anyone's chances of a 50 are. 'Assuming the class did well' is pretty vague; you could 100% everything from now on which would bump you up the rankings, but realistically, going from 50% to 100% doesn't happen overnight. Plus, there's so much score-changing behind the scenes, so I can't possibly say definitely yes or definitely no. I wouldn't even be confident guessing even after all the SACs are over, let alone after the very first one :P

So I'll resort to my default response to questions like this: does it matter? If you knew you could work like crazy and the very best you could end up with was a 49, would you stop trying? I get that 50 is the aim, and I genuinely applaud you for aiming so high, but constantly obsessing over whether a 50 is possible throughout the year is not the best way of going about things. By all means be aware of your capabilities, but putting the numbers out of your head and just getting work done is far more efficient, and you'll probably get a pleasant surprise come results day.

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #234 on: March 10, 2015, 10:25:10 pm »
0
Very true haha

I haven't got 50 yet (%) but I just feel bad about my sac haha....
Just gotta put the hard work in , and I guess doing awesome on the exam will help significantly.

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cosine

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #235 on: March 10, 2015, 10:33:51 pm »
+1
This is how I feel right now for english. There's no hope for me. It seems as much as I try I just see no improvement haha
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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #236 on: March 10, 2015, 11:19:30 pm »
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This is how I feel right now for english. There's no hope for me. It seems as much as I try I just see no improvement haha

Well, Magic worked for me 8) so keep your hopes up
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izzywantsa97

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #237 on: March 11, 2015, 04:47:18 pm »
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We have our first essay sac tomorrow and basically I need help incorporating metalanguage/author's craft in. How are you supposed to do it?
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chansena

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #238 on: March 12, 2015, 05:03:25 pm »
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We have our first essay sac tomorrow and basically I need help incorporating metalanguage/author's craft in. How are you supposed to do it?

What i find useful is always answering,  how does the author do this? I use this when making a new point.  This allows one to explore metalanguage and give an insightful response

Hope this helps :)
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Eiffel

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Re: VCE English Question Thread
« Reply #239 on: March 12, 2015, 11:46:23 pm »
0
how often are you guys doing practice essays etc?