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literally lauren

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Old Prompts and Material
« on: November 14, 2014, 10:34:51 pm »
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This is a collection of prompts for texts that are no longer on the Year 12 list, but may still be useful reference for those in Year 11.

CURRENT PROMPTS HERE <-- <--


Cat's Eye by Margaret Atwood
“Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise.”
Does Elaine ever truly find herself?

“Time is not a line but a dimension, like the dimensions of space.”
Is this the point Elaine is trying to make in the novel?
Discuss.

Cat’s Eye challenges the idea that identity is defined by past experiences.
Do you agree?

“Until we moved to Toronto I was happy.”
How important is where we live in our lives?
Discuss.

The girls hold hands; the boys don’t. If you go in the wrong door you might get the strap, or so everyone says.
How important is the concept of gender in the novel?

Elaine desperately wants to be part of the group. However, it is only when she realizes her own strengths that she is able to develop as an artist and a person.
Discuss.

Cat’s Eye shows us that society’s expectations are damaging to women.
To what extent do you agree?

“Forgiving men is so much easier than forgiving women.”
Why are Elaine’s relationships with women so complicated?

“I'm surprised at how much pleasure this gives me, to know she’s so uneasy, to know I have this much power over her.”
Cat’s Eye reveals the power struggle inherent in human relationships.
Discuss. {engage education A}

What purpose do Atwood’s vivid descriptions of Elaine’s artwork serve? {engage education A}

“We have been shark to one another, but also lifeboat.”
Cat’s Eye explores the contradictions and tensions within any relationship.
Discuss. {engage education B}

The timespan of the novel means that the reader follows not only Elaine’s life, but the changing landscape of Toronto.
Discuss. {engage education B}

The tension in Atwood’s novel stems from the relationship between victim and tormentor.
To what extent do you agree? {engage education C}

All aspects of Elaine’s life are influenced by her childhood.
Discuss. {engage education C}

“We are survivors, of each other. We have been shark to one another, but also lifeboat.”
Elaine is both victim and villain in the course of Cat’s Eye.
Do you agree? {engage education D}

Cat’s Eye explores how memory can be not only fallible, but misleading.
Discuss. {engage education D}
"Love blurs your vision; but after it recedes, you can see more clearly than ever."
Atwood's portrayal of love is far from positive in Cat's Eye. Do you agree? {engage education E}

How does the emphasis on memory and flashbacks influence the novel's exploration of Elaine's search for identity? {engage education E}

lauren's 2014 exams
Exam 1
i. “Another belief of mine: that everyone else my age is an adult, whereas I am merely in disguise.”
Atwood’s emphasis on fragmented and partial identity permeates Cat’s Eye. Discuss.
OR
ii. Discuss the importance of time and place in Atwood’s Cat’s Eye.

Exam 2:
i. Elaine’s relationships are primarily characterised by their instability and uncertainty. Do you agree?
OR
ii. Cat’s Eye is a feminist novel, even if its protagonist refutes such ideologies. Discuss.

Exam 3:
i. “I have never had any friends before and I'm terrified of losing them. I want to please.”
Elaine’ self-awareness does more harm than good. Do you agree?
OR
ii. Discuss the importance of interpolation and temporal displacement in Cat’s Eye.

lauren's 2015 exams
Exam 1
i. In Cat's Eye, the characters are defined more so by their past than their present. Do you agree?
OR
ii. "I peer hard, trying to see which one she is, behind the disguise of the costume. But I can't tell."
None of the characters in Atwood's novel are wholly what they seem. Discuss.

Exam 2
i. How does Atwood use Elaine's artwork to convey a sense of guilt and preoccupation with the past?
OR
ii. It would almost be better if they could be as surly as I am, or surlier; this would make me feel more ordinary.
Part of Elaine's identity crisis stems from the fact that she is so dissimilar from those around her. Do you agree?

Exam 3
i. "You are forced to understand their reasons for doing things and then you are weakened."
Where do Elaine's power and weaknesses come from in Cat's Eye?
OR
ii. "Potential has a shelf life."
To what extent does Atwood celebrate potential and possibility?

Exam 4
i. The reason Elaine cannot fit in is because she does not truly want to. Discuss.
OR
ii. In Cat's Eye, Atwood suggests that people must create their own futures if they want to have control over their lives. Discuss.

Previous VCAA Study Designs

2001:
i. When Elaine returns to Toronto she says: “I know myself to be vengeful, greedy, secretive and sly”.
Does the novel show Elaine’s self-assessment to be accurate?
OR
ii. Cat’s Eye demonstrates how difficult it is to escape from relationships based on power.
Discuss.

2002:
i. How does Elaine’s retrospective exhibition of paintings help her to understand herself and the past?
OR
ii. Cat’s Eye demonstrates the strength of family influence on the lives of children.
Discuss.

VCAA
2012:
i. ‘Elaine’s painting is both a form of therapy and a means of revenge.’
 Discuss.
OR
ii. To what extent have cruelty and kindness shaped the relationships in Cat’s Eye?

2013:
i. How does Cat’s Eye show the importance of family in personal development?
OR
ii. Cat’s Eye shows how diffi cult it can be for people to come to terms with their past.
Discuss.

2014:
i. It is Elaine's experience as an outsider that contributes to her success as an artist.
Discuss.
OR
ii. The relationship between Cordelia and Elaine is destructive to them both.
Discuss.

2015:
i. "Galleries are frightening places, places of evaluation, of judgement."
In both her personal and professional life, Elaine years for approval. Discuss.
OR
ii. "But I'm not used to girls, or familiar with their customs."
Cat's Eye explores the nature of female friendship. Discuss.

Henry IV Part 1 by William Shakespeare
“Why, thou owest God a death.”
To what extent do religion and morality influence the actions of the characters in Henry IV, Part 1?

Shakespeare explores the qualities that are desirable in a ruler throughout the play.
Discuss.

Part of the conflict between Prince Hal and his father occurs because they are so similar.
Do you agree?

The play explores the relationship between public and private personas.’
Discuss.

At the centre of this play is Henry’s doubt about his own right to the crown.
Discuss.

Falstaff embodies the idea of freedom in the play.
Do you agree?

Shakespeare concludes that honour comes before individual safety.
Do you agree?

Hotspur is the most honest character in the play.
Discuss.

Prince Hal is a calculating and manipulative character.
Do you agree?

Is Henry a corrupt despot or a good king trying to hold on to power?

Most of the characters in the play see themselves as actors.
Discuss.

Hal is surrounded by figures who influence his development. From whom does he learn the most?

In Henry IV Part 1 the needs of the country are shown to count for more than the needs of individuals. Discuss.

The fathers in Henry IV Part 1 are defined more by their shortcomings than by their virtues.’ How effective are the father figures in the play?

Hotspur is the most honest character in the play.
Discuss.

Prince Hal is a calculating and manipulative character.
Do you agree?

Is Henry a corrupt despot or a good king trying to hold on to power?

Falstaff is the true hero of the play.
Discuss.

Prince Hal develops a range of unconventional skills that will enable him to become a wise and effective ruler. Is this how you see Hal’s experiences in the play?

Hal is like any ordinary young man who is struggling to live up to parental expectations. Discuss.

Falstaff fosters his friendship with Hal in the hope that he will be able to influence the Prince when he becomes King. Is Falstaff motivated purely by self-interest?

Falstaff feigns death on the battlefield, then defends himself by saying, “The better part of valour is discretion.” Is Falstaff’s idea of valour supported by the play as a whole?

Part of the conflict between Prince Hal and his father is because they are so similar.’  Do you agree?

At the centre of this play is Henry’s doubt about his own right to the crown.  Discuss.

Most of the characters in the play see themselves as actors.  Discuss.

Hal says to Falstaff, “Thou art not what thou seemest.”  Are any of the characters truly what they ‘seem’ to others?

Falstaff embodies the idea of freedom in the play. Do you agree?

The play shows the disorder and conflict that result when society’s rulers are driven by greed and ambition.  Discuss.

The play explores the relationship between public and private personas.  Discuss.

'"Banish plump Jack, and banish all the world"
Despite his many negative qualities, Falstaff is the most appealing character in the play.
Do you agree?

If a ruler is corrupt then it is acceptable to rebel against his power.
To what extent does the play endorse this notion?

Falstaff not only brings wit and comedy to Henry IV Part 1, he also serves other vital functions. Discuss.

In such a patriarchal play, it is not surprising that the relationship between fathers and sons is a key theme. Discuss.

Falstaff is more open about his intentions than any other character in the play.
Discuss.

Despite the play's title, King Henry actually has very little role in the play.
Discuss.

Henry IV Part 1 warns against the dangers of rebelling against a monarch. How does the play deliver this warning?

The father figures in Henry IV Part 1 are defined more by their shortcomings than by their virtues. Do you agree?

Prince Hal is nothing if not calculating and manipulative. Discuss.

Hal's greatest struggly is living up to the expectations of his father. To what extent do you agree?

Part of the conflict between Prince Hal and his father occurs because they are so similar. Do you agree?

Most of the characters in Henry IV Part 1 see themselves as actors. Discuss.

Henry IV Part 1 explores the relationship between public and private personas. Discuss.

“[T]hou art only marked/For the hot vengeance and the rod of heaven./ To punish my mistreadings.”
To what extent is Henry responsible for the corruption in his kingdom?

Legitimacy as a ruler is not only a concern of King Henry’s, but of the play as a whole.
Discuss. {engage education A}

“I shall think the better of myself, and thee, during my life – I for a valiant lion, and thou for a true prince.”
What roles does Falstaff perform within the context of Henry IV Part 1? {engage education A}

What is the significance of low status characters in Henry IV Part 1? {engage education B}

In what ways and to what end does Shakespeare use symmetry in Henry IV Part 1? {engage education B}

The greatest challenge to the rulers of Henry IV Part 1 is finding a balance between their power and their humanity.
To what extent do you agree? {engage education C}

What comment does Shakespeare make about the journey of adolescents to maturity in Henry IV: Part 1? {engage education C}

There is so much deceptive behaviour in Henry IV Part 1 that it is difficult for the audience to trust any of the characters.
Do you agree? {engage education D}

In what ways and for what purpose does Shakespeare draw parallels between the low class world of Eastcheap and the high class world of the court in Henry IV: Part 1? {engage education D}

"...sweet Jack Falstaff, kind Jack Falstaff, true Jack Falstaff, caliant Jack Falstaff..."
Falstaff is many things, but none of those that he presents himself as.
Discuss. {engage education E}

What significance does magic and belief in magic hold for the characters of Henry IV: Part 1? {engage education E}

lauren's 2014 exam
Exam 1:
i. There are more role-players than roles in Henry IV Part 1. Discuss.
OR
ii. "I, by looking on the praise of him, See riot and dishonour stain the brow Of my young Harry."
King Henry is a better monarch than he is a father. Do you agree?

Exam 2:
i. “I live out of all order, out of all compass.” To what extent is this true of Falstaff?
OR
ii. The world of Henry IV Part 1 is more stable at the start of the play than at the end. Discuss.

Exam 3:
i. Hal emerges as the play’s hero because he has youth and time on his side. Discuss.
OR
ii. “I would ‘twere bed time, Hal, and all well.”
The main question of Henry IV Part 1 is not where Hal's loyalties lie, but where they audience's sympathies lie. Discuss.

lauren's 2015 exams
Exam 1
i. Hal's relationship with Falstaff is solely and exploitative one. Discuss.
OR
ii. Henry IV Part 1 is a play of symmetries. Discuss.

Exam 2
i. How does Henry IV Part 1 show the importance of planning and foresight?
OR
ii. In this play, the ability to control language is the most crucial factor in the characters' successes. Do you agree?

Exam 3
i. "I would to God, thou and I knew where a commodity of good names were to be bought."
To what extent do the characters' reputations in Henry IV Part 1 define them?
OR
ii. "Sir John stands to his word, the devil shall have his bargain; for he was never yet a breaker of proverbs: he will give the devil his due.”
Hal is not the only character who keeps his promise and accomplishes what he sets out to do. Do you agree?

Exam 4
i. King Henry seems like a much less capable king compared to his son. Do you agree?
OR
ii. The characters who succeed in the society of Henry IV Part 1 are those who understand why image is so important. Discuss.

VCAA

2012:
i. “Thou art not what thou seemest.”
Playing a part is the only way to gain power in Henry IV, Part I.
Discuss.
OR
ii. Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part I explores what it means to be an honest and honourable man.
Discuss.

i. It is in the prince’s generosity of spirit that we see the beginnings of true kingship.
Do you agree?
OR
ii. The play shows that there are many ways of being a rebel.
Discuss.

2014:
i. Henry IV Part 1 is about the need for order, or at least the appearance of order.
Discuss.
OR
ii. It is through Falstaff that the play's most powerful insights are offered.
Do you agree?

2015:
i. Hal is a disappointment, both as a son as a prince. Discuss.
OR
ii. How is the idea of leadership explored in Henry IV Part 1?

The War Poems by Wilfred Owen
Despite the horror of war, Owen captures moments of love, spirituality and camaraderie.
Do you agree?

These poems are both evocatively beautiful, and horrifying.
Discuss.

Owen brings to life the pain and suffering of ordinary men living through an extraordinary event.
Do you agree?

The futility of war is the major theme of Owen’s verse.
Discuss.

The poetry is in the pity. Explain what Owen meant by this statement.

Owen said, “All a poet can do today is warn”.
How does Owen demonstrate this in his poetry?

It is hard to say who or what is the greatest enemy in the poetry of Wilfred Owen, for his bitterness is directed at more than one target. Discuss.

Owen's imagery is just as strong as his anti-war sentiments. Discuss.

The war gives Owen a subject matter worthy of his emotional fervour and rich poetic idiom. Discuss.

To what extent can Owen's inner conflict be said to surpass the external ones he depicts?

The war is not the only theme that links Owen’s poems.
Discuss. {engage education A}

The War Poems is not only anti-war, but altogether pessimistic.
Do you agree? {engage education A}

Owen’s poetry attempts to offer a complete and authentic account of the realities of warfare.
Discuss. {engage education B}

Owen’s poetry speaks to the deep fraternal bond that is built between men in times of conflict.
Do you agree? {engage education B}

The power of Owen’s poetry lies in the synthesis between realism and romantic depictions.
Discuss. {engage education C}

It is not only the subject matter of the collection, but the voice in which it is written that makes Owen’s poetry so unsettling.
Discuss. {engage education C}

Many of Owen’s poems speak of a conspiracy of silence.
Discuss. {engage education D}

It is hard to say who or what is the greatest enemy in the poetry of Wilfred Owen, for his bitterness is directed at more than one target.
Discuss. {engage education D}

For all its focus on depctions of physical hardship, Owen's poetry has much to say about both the emotional and spiritual worlds of the people it depicts. Discuss. {engage education E}

How does Owen create a sense of time and place in his poetry? {engage education E}

lauren's 2014 exam

Exam 1:
i. Owen's messages of loss and absence are more confronting than his gory imagery. Do you agree?
OR
ii. "And each slow dusk a drawing down of blinds" (Anthem For Doomed Youth) The 'doomed' members of society are not just those who went to war. Discuss.

Exam 2:
i. In spite of the carnage and horror, Owen’s voice in his War Poems is a compassionate one. Discuss.
OR
ii. Owen’s poetry is full of echoes. Discuss.

Exam 3:
i. “I try not to remember these things now.” (The Sentry)
To what extent can Owen’s poetry be seen as a means of escaping from horrific memories?
OR
ii. Owen’s poetry challenges audiences to re-evaluate more than just their attitude towards war. Discuss.

lauren's 2014 exam

Exam 1:
i. Owen's poetry shows that war is not the worst thing a man can endure. Do you agree?
OR
ii. "I, too, say God through mud-
The mud that cracked on cheeks when wretches smiled."
Discuss the significance of the speaker in The War Poems.

Exam 2:
i. "O what made fatuous sunbeams toil
To break earth's sleep at all?"
Owen's poetry is concerned with the causes of war just as much as the consequences of it. Discuss.
OR
ii. How do Owen's poems portray and convey a sense of guilt?

Exam 3:
i. Owen suggests that the worst part of the war stems from the fact that it was unexpected. Discuss.
OR
ii. To what extent are the speakers in Owen's poems involved in the horrors around them?

Exam 4:
i. Owen's poetry shows how survival comes at a cost. Do you agree?
OR
ii. How does Owen convey an anti-war sentiment throughout his poems?

VCAA

2012:
i. Owen’s poems reveal tenderness and compassion towards those whose lives have been destroyed by the war.’
Discuss.
OR
ii. The poems condemn those who encourage young men to go to war.
Discuss.

2013:
i. “These men are worth/Your tears.” (‘Apologia Pro Poemate Meo’)
Owen does not let us view the experiences of the soldiers from a comfortable distance.
Discuss.
OR
 ii. In Owen’s war poems, the imagery leads us to focus more on the living than the dead.
Discuss.

2014:
i. How do Owen's poems expose the tragedy of war?
OR
ii. These poems reveal the soldiers' inability to deal with the atrocities they witness and commit.
Discuss.

2015:
i. In War Poems, Owen is determined to tell the truth. Discuss.
OR
ii. Owen's poems express sympathy for the young men sent to fight and anger towards those who sent them. Discuss.

Will You Please Be Quiet Please by Raymond Carver
Carver’s characters are doomed to stay as they are.
Do you agree?

How is the dissatisfaction in American families presented by Carver?

Carver demonstrates that seemingly trivial experiences can have deeper meaning.
Discuss.

Carver’s short stories aptly present the reality that relationships are both essential to life and at the same time very hard to get right. Discuss.

Carver’s stories often have unresolved endings, as they present problems without offering any solutions.
To what extent do you agree?

Characters do not express their true thoughts or feelings and as a result, betrayals
permeate many of the stories.
Discuss.

Hope and despair are held in an uneasy balance by “the working poor”.
To what extent does this describe the characters in Carver’s stories?

What effect does the sparseness of Carver’s writing have on the reader’s interpretation of the
stories in the collection? {engage education A}

Carver’s characters are not relatable, but even more so, they are unbelievable.
Do you agree? {engage education A}

The simplicity of Carver’s depictions adds to the emotional intensity of the collection.
To what extent does Carver’s writing style impact on the collection? {engage education B}

Carver’s collection reveals the secret thoughts and secret fears of suburban America.
Discuss. {engage education B}

Carver’s characters are enduring because they are ordinary and to an extent, relatable.
Discuss. {engage education C}

The greatest link between Carver’s stories is the sense of disquiet in each.
Do you agree? {engage education C}

Carver’s stories offer no sense of closure.
Do you agree? {engage education D}

In what ways and to what effect are Carver’s characters isolated? {engage education D}

Characters are constantly on the precipice of decision or self-discovery in Will You Please Be Quiet Please? but their fulfilment never comes. Do you agree? {engage education E}

There is a great deal left unsaid in Carver's writing, allowing for assumption and interpretation to be read between the lines. Discuss. {engage education E}

lauren's 2014 exam

Exam 2:
i. The characters who are able to let go of the past are the only ones capable of happiness. Do you agree?
OR
ii. “It was during this time – his lowest ebb, as he referred to it later – that Ralph believed he almost had a nervous breakdown.”

Exam 3:
i. The isolationism of Carver’s stories offer little comfort or closure. Discuss.
OR
ii. Ralph reconnects with Marian in many different ways in Will You Please Be Quiet, Please. Discuss.

VCAA

2012:
i. In these stories, Carver shows more sympathy for men than for women.
Discuss.
OR
ii. In Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?, Carver presents lives that seem hopeless.
Discuss

2013:
i. In Carver’s stories, very little seems to be happening.
Discuss.
OR
ii. It is difficult to feel compassion for Carver’s characters.
To what extent do you agree?

2014:
i. "My life is going to change. I feel it."
Carver writes about the turning points in people's lives.
Discuss.
OR
ii. Carver's stories are full of unresolved tensions, but there are also moments of closeness.
Discuss.

2015:
i. Carver's stories confront the reader with the emptiness of everyday life. Do you agree?
OR
ii. Carver's characters do not always grasp their opportunities. Discuss.

Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks
The plague was a vehicle for unleashing the hidden fears and suspicions that governed the lives of the village. Do you agree?

"Anna Frith, a woman who had faced more terrors than many warriors. It is the women in the text that prove to be stronger in the face of adversity. To what extent do you agree?

While many characters in Year of Wonders display admirable qualities, Anna Frith is the true heroine of the novel. Do you agree?

In Year of Wonders, it is the female characters who display the greatest strength and resilience. Do you agree?

More than anything else, it is Anna's courage and determination that results in her eventual freedom. Do you agree?

In Year of Wonders, all characters who survive the plague emerge transformed. Discuss.

How does Year of Wonders explore notions of punishment and retribution?

The true heroes in Year of Wonders, are those who put others' needs ahead of their own. Discuss.

Year of Wonders demonstrates the sinister side of religious fervour. Discuss.

Year of Wonders suggests that nature and religion will always be opposing forces. Discuss.

"From death and destruction inevitable comes rebirth." Discuss.

Year of Wonders is a story of great courage in the face of extreme adversity. Discuss.

It is the first-person narration of Anna Frith that makes Year of Wonders so emotionally engaging for readers. Do you agree?

Anna Frith's narration of events in Year of Wonders conveys the idea that humanity is at the mercy of the natural world. Discuss.

Geraldine Brooks' Year of Wonders is a bleak exploration of human suffering and cruelty. Discuss.

In Year of Wonders, Anna Frith is presented as "too good to be true." To what extent do you agree?

The decision made by Mompellion to isolate the village in Year of Wonders is motivated by his own selfish reasons. Discuss.

The male characters in Year of Wonders are all weak. Is this how you see the novel?

Brooks shows that tragedy brings out the worst in human nature. Discuss.

Although Anna is presented as a strong woman, she is still constrained by the expectations of her time. Discuss.

Who is the real heroine of the novel: Elinor or Anna? Discuss.

Anna is the embodiment of goodness while Mompellion is the embodiment of selfishness. Is this how these characters seem to you?

This novel illustrates the conflict between medieval values and enlightened thinking. Discuss.

Year of Wonders explores how fear can tear apart the lives of individuals and society as a whole. To what extent do you agree?

Year of Wonders illustrates that some individuals will react irrationally to people and occurrences that they do not understand. Discuss.

Who is the real heroine of the novel: Anna Frith, or Elinor Mompellion?

Year of Wonders illustrates that some people will react irrationally to people and occurrences that they do not understand. Discuss.

The characters in Year of Wonders lose faith in humanity, rather than in God. To what extent do you agree?

How does Year of Wonders explores notions of heroism and faith?

Brooks uses cycles throughout the novel, not only in terms of the chapters, but also what happens to the characters. Discuss.

What are the pivotal experiences leading to Anna's mental and spiritual unravelling?

Mompellion's push for quarantine reflects his own dark side. Discuss.

How does Brooks construct a sense of the wonders that took place during the plague year?

“I have told Ahmed Bey that I cannot say I have faith anymore. Hope, perhaps. We have agreed that it will do, for now.”
How are the themes of faith, nature and superstition explored in Year of Wonders?

Year of Wonders demonstrates the destructive nature of love. Discuss.

While the novel seems to be preoccupied with the horrors of the plague, more important issues seem to interest the reader. Discuss.

This novel shows the importance of having and questioning one's faith in times of crisis. Discuss.


VCAA

2010:
i. How does Anna's view of the world change in the course of the novel?
ii. Mompellion warns the villagers: "Fear will be your only faithful companion, and it will be with you day and night."
How does fear affect the lives of the people in the village?

2011:
i. "In the end, I [Anna] did not make the choice so much as have it made for me."
Is this true of other characters in the village?
ii. How does Brooks develop a sense of time and of place in this novel?

2012:
i. In the face of the plague, the characters' beliefs disintegrate. Discuss.
ii. The ignorance of the villagers is more powerful than Anna's growing knowledge. Discuss.

2013:
i. The novel explores how people reveal unexpected qualities under pressure. Discuss.
ii. It is Mompellion's own needs, not the needs of the community, that drive him to propose the isolation of the village. Discuss.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2016, 08:43:03 pm by literally lauren »

charmanderp

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Re: Prompts and Sample Language Analysis Articles
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2014, 04:48:23 pm »
+4
Language Analysis Sample Articles

If you have links to sample texts you think are good to write LA essays on, PM an English mod.

DISCLAIMER: Just because I post an article here, it doesn't mean I endorse its opinion. I've only linked it because I believe its use of language in argument is conducive to analysis for the purpose of your practice.

Newspaper Articles/Print Media

Online Blogs/Opinion
Speeches
Visual media
Spoiler

Online sources for persuasive texts
VCAA English Exams
Spoiler

You'll notice that there are quite a few articles from different sources/authors on the same issues e.g. Afghanistan. Take a look at how each commentators writes differently within the same discourse, even if they're 'on the same side'.

Spoiler
http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/withdrawal-from-afghanistan-would-not-hurt-our-us-ties-20111123-1nuyv.html

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/opinion/australians-must-embrace-gay-marriage/story-e6frfhqf-1226356692553#

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/how-australia-can-solve-its-asylum-seeker-problem-20110624-1gjlt.html

http://www.canberratimes.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/youve-been-misled-on-boat-people-here-are-the-facts-20130718-2q5rv.html

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/21/cruelty-refugees-australia

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/opinion/shopping-for-pink-isnt-the-right-thing/story-e6frfhqf-1225984630426

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/transcript-of-julia-gillards-speech-20121010-27c36.html

http://www.abrahamlincolnonline.org/lincoln/speeches/gettysburg.htm

http://badhostess.com/making-chelsea-manning-behave/

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/13/sophie-mirabella-hate

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/4518400.html

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/39194.html

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/2840150.html

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2013/08/why-teach-english.html

http://theconversation.com/national-press-club-address-glyn-davis-on-a-smarter-australia-12503

https://theconversation.com/ordering-the-vegetarian-meal-theres-more-animal-blood-on-your-hands-4659

https://theconversation.com/love-thy-neighbour-religious-groups-should-not-be-exempt-from-discrimination-laws-11634

https://theconversation.com/how-do-people-reject-climate-science-9065

http://www.abc.net.au/mediawatch/transcripts/1109_heraldsun09.pdf

http://blogs.news.com.au/heraldsun/andrewbolt/index.php/heraldsun/C899

http://www.smh.com.au/comment/smh-editorial/australians-deserve-a-government-they-can-trust-20130905-2t7wm.html

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/opinion/funding-cuts-a-concern-for-all/story-e6frgd0x-1226621964048#

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/opinion/consign-rudd-to-the-bin-of-history/story-fni0cwl5-1226691046953

http://rightnow.org.au/topics/asylum-seekers/the-economic-cost-of-our-asylum-seeker-policy/

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/2693018.html

http://lofalexandria.com/2013/04/the-death-penalty-there-is-nothing-even-remotely-close-to-a-reasonable-argument-in-favor-of-the-death-penalty/

http://powerhouse.theglobalmail.org/tobacco-money-can-cause-loss-of-political-will/

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion/it-was-inevitable-that-afghanistan-was-going-to-end-badly-20120419-1xa3s.html

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/opinion/gillard-on-target-as-taliban-fail/story-e6frezz0-1226331896515

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/afghanistan/8811172/Its-a-fantasy-to-think-we-are-winning-the-war-in-Afghanistan.html

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2012/10/24/were_winning_in_afghanistan

http://www.theage.com.au/comment/live-animal-exports-a-struggle-to-the-death-20130507-2j5oz.html

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/tunnel-could-take-its-toll/story-e6freuy9-1226600977408

Some websites to check out
http://theconversation.com/au

http://www.tmglobalist.org/

http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/political-opinion

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/opinion

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/opinion
« Last Edit: November 15, 2014, 04:55:00 pm by charmanderp »
University of Melbourne - Bachelor of Arts majoring in English, Economics and International Studies (2013 onwards)

literally lauren

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Re: Prompts and Sample Language Analysis Articles
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2014, 08:56:55 pm »
+6
Context

The Imaginative Landscape
The places we live in reveal what kind of people we are.

Differing experiences within a landscape can be unsettling.

It is impossible for us to separate ourselves from our outer world.

Changes in the physical environment can affect people in surprising ways.

Everyone lives in two landscapes – the internal and the external.

The landscapes that we create in our minds help to keep our imaginations alive.

Landscape is often linked to emotion.

We need to hold onto illusions in order to cope with reality.

The place in which we live has an impact on our understanding of the world.

Who we are and what we believe about the world is tied to the landscape in which we feel most at home.

The way we relate to our physical environment can determine the kind of person we become.

Changes to the place in which we live can cause pain and a sense of loss.

People’s fears and desires are often revealed through their perceptions of the external landscape.

Landscapes are not neutral, static spaces. We are able to transform them in our minds.

Moving away from familiar landscapes often causes pain and a sense of loss.

A harsh landscape can cause a corresponding hardness in its inhabitants’ approach to life.

It can be difficult to accept changes that happen to a familiar landscape.

Landscape may challenge our sense of belonging.

The imagination’s interaction with the landscape reveals important truths about human behaviour.

The divide between the imagination and the landscape can never be conquered.

We make important connections with the landscape through our imagination.

A landscape steeped in tradition and family influence is supportive but can also be stifling.

Natural landscapes are blank canvases, waiting to be transformed by our imagination.

Our first remembered landscape tells us who we are.

The place within us is just as real as the space around us. {engage education A}

There is much more to human interaction with landscape than what can be physically experienced. {engage education B}

The world around us shapes the world within us. {engage education C}

Landscapes are not significant at the time we experience them, but when we internalise them. {engage education D}

We are capable of moving between exterior and interior worlds to make sense of out relationship with the physical landscape. {engage education E}

lauren's 2014 exams

2014 Exam 1:
Landscapes only affect us when we ascribe them importance.

2014 Exam 2:
We cannot change the world around us without trying.

2014 Exam 3:
Our imagination is always more potent than our surroundings.

VCAA

2008:
Events and experiences influence the way we connect to place.

2009:
We live in a specific time and place yet, simultaneously, we experience an internal life that is not limited in this way.

2010:
The inner landscape and its relationship to the outer world is significant in people’s lives.

2011:
We create the places in which we dwell.

2012:
The ways in which we understand a landscape and respond to it can change over time.

2013:
Our surroundings can be both threatening and comforting.

2014:
Imagination shapes our response to the landscape.

Whose Reality?
Our view of the world depends on who we are and where we come from.

Our understanding of reality reflects our understanding of ourselves.

Nothing is more destructive to us than having our inner reality ridiculed or ignored.

People can never be sure that they share the same understanding of truth.

One person’s reality can be another person’s fantasy.

We can never attain a fully objective view of reality because we remain trapped in the prison of our subjectivity.

The line between illusion and madness is a fine one.

When we attempt to make order out of chaos then we risk distorting reality.

A child's world is shaped by their parents' reality.

Writing is an act that always involves a revision of reality.

Every reality is open to interpretation.

It is easier to remain happy in a world of illusion than it is to face reality.

Believing is seeing. The reality that we perceive is the reality that we want to perceive.

An experience becomes real when others feel what it felt like for you.

Through our imaginations we can experience different worlds.

A memory is equal parts fact and self-deception.

People's memories shape their understanding of themselves, their world and others.

Memories and the truth will always mean different things to different individuals.

We can never attain a fully objective view of reality because we remain trapped in the prison of our subjectivity.

When competing realities clash the result can be only tragedy.

Science provides no better description of reality than art or religion can.

Our sanity depends on a clear understanding of what is and isn't real.

'A person's self-image can interfere with their ability to perceive reality clearly.'

The same event can provide very different versions of reality.

We need to hold onto illusions in order to cope with reality.

What we feel tells us what is real.

One’s reality is influenced by various events.

One person’s reality can make perfect sense to them, but little sense to anyone else.

Reality has the ability to crush the human spirit.

We need to hold onto illusions in order to cope with reality.

Our sanity depends on a clear understanding of what is real and what isn't.

We believe what those who are stronger than us tell us to believe.

What we feel tells us what is real.

There is a difficulty in maintaining one’s sense of self and of one’s reality in the world in which one lives.

Reality has the ability to crush the human spirit.

One person’s reality can make perfect sense to them, but little sense to anyone else.

People attempt to escape a reality that has become totally unpalatable.

One’s reality is influenced by various events.

The same event can provide very different versions of reality.

When competing realities clash the only result can be tragedy.

Memories make the person.

Truth itself is an illusion.

What we convince ourselves we don't know, won't hurt us.

The amount of power we have in a particular situation determines how we see it.

Our perspective on social norms has been filtered by our experiences.

We can never attain a fully objective view of reality because we remain trapped in the prison of our subjectivity.

The line between illusion and madness is a fine one.

When we attempt to make order out of chaos then we risk distorting reality.

When the differing perceptions of people conflict, catastrophe is sure to arise.

The truth is sometimes difficult to discover.

Some people’s versions of reality are more accurate than others.

Reality depends entirely on the individual and the context they find themselves in.

Differences in perceptions result from the differences of individuals.

A child's world is shaped by their parents’ reality.

Writing is an act that always involves a revision of reality.

Every reality is open to interpretation.

Reality is beyond the understanding of mere humans.

Believing is seeing. The reality that we perceive is the reality that we want to perceive.

Subjective realities are the only ones that matter.

Sometimes it is difficult for us to understand our own realities.

We can distort our own realities just as much as outside influences can.

When realities clash, values must be compromised.

It is dangerous to invest too much trust in any reality.

Accepting objective truths is not always the best option.

Evading reality can have serious consequences.

We must constantly revise our understanding of the world in order to avoid delusion.

Illusory realities are sometimes necessary.

People cannot remain invulnerable to objective realities.

One person is capable of shaping reality for many. {engage education A}

Subverting reality is easier than accepting it. {engage education B}

We cannot come to terms with reality - past, present, and future - without deluding ourselves. {engage education C}

Memories can transform into illusions that shape how we experience the world around us. {engage education D}

Seeing and experiencing reality differently to others can be isolating. {engage education E}

lauren's 2014 exams

2014 Exam 1:
Reality is too intangible for us to ever truly embrace it.

2014 Exam 2:
Only when we accept other realities can we hope to understand one another.

2014: Exam 3:
The search for perfection is a dangerous one.


VCAA


2008:
We can evade “reality” but we cannot avoid the consequences of doing so.

2009:
We do not see things as they are. We see them as we are.

2010:
Sometimes people find themselves living in a world created by other people.

2011:
Shared experience does not mean that people see things the same way.

2012:
Our fantasies can be more powerful than our reality.

2013:
Losing touch with reality is often dangerous.

2014:
Misrepresenting reality can have serious consequences.

Encountering Conflict
The choices we make under pressure can show us what we truly value.

Without disagreement there can never be reconciliation.

Every conflict involves both an internal and an external struggle.

A conflict’s importance lies not in its causes but in its consequences.

At the heart of conflict is fear.

It is through conflict that we grow.

Encountering conflict changes both those with power and those without power.

Conflict can be a catalyst for change.

Fear and ignorance generally have catastrophic consequences.

In conflict there are no winners, only losers.

Conflict and injustice arise from the human rive for power over others.

Ignorance is the main reason that conflict occurs.

The reasons for conflict are never simple.

Conflict and injustice arise from the human drive for power over others.

Encounters with conflict arise from miscommunication.

The reasons why conflict occurs, are less important than how conflict is resolved.

Encountering conflict changes both those with power and those without power.

A conflict’s importance lies not in its causes but in its consequences.

In conflict there are no winners, only losers.

It is through conflict that we grow.

Fear and ignorance generally have catastrophic consequences.

There are both winners and losers in conflict.

Survivors of conflict are forever shaped by their experiences.

The most significant divisions in any community are not ethical or moral, but personal animosities, insecurities and greed.

Conflict is inevitable and it is a fact of life that stronger social groups will win out over weaker ones.

Conflict occurs between the powerful and the powerless

The best way to deal with conflict is head-on, not by avoiding it.

The search for truth and justice is vital in resolving conflicts.

Conflict is resolved through better understanding.

Conflicts may be difficult to resolve.

Conflicts involve a clash of ideas, interests and expectations.

People’s responses to conflict vary.

Who we are is truly tested and proven when we encounter conflict.

Conflict can reveal unexpected qualities in an individual.

Conflict has only negative effects on individuals.

Conflict is inevitable, the way we deal with it is not.

Conflict is inevitable and the consequences are felt for generations.

Conflict is born out of ignorance, intolerance and fear.

Changes born of conflict are not all bad.

It is possible to resolve conflict, but sometimes we choose not to do.

Conflict is a catalyst for change.

In times of conflict, ordinary people find themselves capable of great things.

Conflicts can never be resolved if people refuse to learn from them.

Responding to conflict involves reevaluating one’s world view.

Conflict can catalyse growth, but it can also stifle us.

The consequences of our actions in times of conflict matter more than our intentions.

Conflict can change people irrevocably.

Conflict makes people weak.

Confrontation with the unfamiliar can often lead to conflict.

Sometimes we do not choose to encounter conflict, but we must encounter it nonetheless.

The nature of conflict is such that some people make gains, but only at the cost of others.

It is up to us whether a conflict becomes productive or destructive.

Communication is the key to preventing conflict. {engage education A}

Conflict can only be resolved by dispelling ignorance. {engage education B}

Conflict reveals what is wrong and what is right in the world. {engage education C}

It is not actions, but intention that dictates whether one is moral or immoral during times of conflict. {engage education D}

If, when, and how a conflict is resolved is determined by the distribution and use of power. {engage education E}

lauren's 2014 exams

2014 Exam 1:
The experience of conflict can make our previous moral systems untenable.

2014 Exam 2:
Not all conflicts can be resolved; some are eternal.

2014 Exam 3:
Conflict can never be resolved if one seeks only to ascribe blame to others.

VCAA

2008:
In times of conflict ordinary people can act in extraordinary ways.

2009:
It is the victims of conflict who show us what is really important.

2010:
It is difficult to remain a bystander in any situation of conflict.

2011:
The ability to compromise is important when responding to conflict.

2012:
The experience of conflict changes people’s priorities.

2013:
Conflict of conscience can be just as difficult as conflict between people.

2014:
Conflict causes harm to both the powerful and the powerless.

Exploring Issues of Identity and Belonging
The need to belong can completely change who we are.

Our connections with those around us make us who we are.

It is mostly our individual experiences that shape our personal identities.

Belonging to a group gives one a sense of identity.

Families stifle who we are.

Maintaining one’s own identity is more important than belonging to a group.

To conform to the expectations of others may be very self-destructive for the individual.

The environment we belong to ultimately shapes who we are.

Cultural identity and belonging is paramount to one’s sense of self.

The pressures that stem from an individual's lifestyle make self reflection impossible.

There are costs to the individual in belonging to a group.

Society often creates unrealistic and unattainable expectations of individuals.

If we are unaware of whom we really are – we can never be truly content.

Without close and supportive relationships, we can often feel isolated.

To conform to the expectations of others may be very self-destructive for the individual.

Maintaining one’s own identity is more important than belonging to a group.

Cultural identity and belonging is paramount to one’s sense of self.

A strong sense of identity depends on belonging to community as well as to family.

The environment we belong to ultimately shapes who we are.

Belonging to a group gives one a sense of identity.

The pressures that stem from an individual's lifestyle make self reflection impossible.

Belonging involves conforming and a loss of identity.

Sacrifices are necessary in order for an individual to feel accepted in a community.

One needs to be one’s true self.

Our relationships with others define who we are.

Before acquiring a strong sense of self, hardships need to be experienced.

Belonging is always preferable to alienation.

Choosing not to belong may be detrimental, yet rewarding.

Families stifle who we are.

Belonging requires sacrifices that may lead to unhappiness.

Who we are often depends on where we are.

Stereotypes limit the growth of our identity.

The fulfillment of one's duties can lead to the loss of one's individuality.

Happiness is linked to a stable sense of self.

Our sense of who we are is directly influenced by the people in our lives.

Our personal security comes from the experiences that also shape our identity.

Families play a role in abolishing isolation.

There is no shame in changing ourselves to make others like us. {engage education A}

The community we are a part of plays a role in establishing how we see ourselves. {engage education B}

Without others to follow there would be no foundation upon which to build our sense of identity. {engage education C}

True loneliness is not exclusion, but a failure to know oneself. {engage education D}

Both our sense of belonging and identity cannot be inflexible; eventually one will have to give. {engage education E}

lauren's 2014 exams

2014 Exam 1:
Our compulsion to belong is more dangerous than where we may belong.

2014 Exam 2:
Everyone is capable of changing their identity.

2014 Exam 3:
Sometimes unstable identities are better than stable ones.

VCAA

2008:
Our relationships with others help us to define who we are.

2009:
To be true to yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest achievement.

2010:
Having a sense of being different makes it difficult to belong.

2011:
Without connection to others there is no me.

2012:
Each person has different identities for different relationships and situations.

2013:
Sometimes we need to accept change in order to grow.

2014:
Discovering who we are and where we belong can be challenging.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 02:51:32 pm by literally lauren »