Login | Register
Enrol now for our new online tutoring program. Learn from the best tutors. Get amazing results. Learn more.

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

September 27, 2021, 08:12:47 am

Author Topic: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2017 and beyond  (Read 19130 times)  Share 

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Joseph41

  • Administrator
  • Great Wonder of ATAR Notes
  • *****
  • Posts: 10655
  • Respect: +7378
[50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2017 and beyond
« on: October 30, 2014, 07:02:32 pm »
+21
Hiya, friends! This thread has now been updated for 2017! Yay! ;D

I received a 50 in HHD in 2012, and I want you to score a 50, too. This thread has a few functions: a) encouraging people to choose HHD in the first place; b) providing an overview of the syllabus; and c) giving tips on how to ace the subject. The original thread, which is very similar, can be found in the spoiler at the end of this post.

Should I study Health & Human Development?

Spoiler
tl;dr: yes.

But that’s^ obviously a fairly skewed response – and, of course, subject selection in general is a very individual thing. If you’re looking for general subject selection advice, I suggest reading this thread by Heidi and this one by Glasses. Fantastic resources! But for now, here are some reasons you may wish to consider HHD:

1.   Applicability:
Later on in this thread, I will provide a briefish overview of what you can expect to cover in HHD. Through that, I think it’s quite clear that HHD is a very applicable subject. What do I mean by that, exactly? Basically, I mean that the shit you learn about is shit important in real life. How the Australian healthcare system works, the importance of sustainability, nutrition, international aspirations to health, and so on. Really, really interesting stuff, and absolutely things that you can incorporate into your very own life.

And the cool thing with HHD is that it’s absolutely not stagnant; it changes all the time to correspond with things happening in the real world. Like, when the Abbott Government decided to make AusAID a part of DFAT, the study design changed to incorporate this. The formal priorities of Australian aid have changed, and the study design has changed to incorporate this. The Millennium Development Goals have been replaced by the Sustainable Development Goals, and so on (don’t worry if this terminology is unfamiliar). The fundamental point is that you’re learning about important and ever-evolving stuff, and that’s tops.

2.   Careers:
Due to the “real life” applicability outlined above, HHD can be beneficial for a whole bunch of careers – and even if you don’t use it directly, it’s still useful information to know. I know (of) people who have undertaken HHD and subsequently studied Medicine, Laws, Arts, Economics, Health Sciences, Accounting, Education, Design, and a bunch of other stuff. My point here is that those who study HHD are not a particular ‘type’: it’s good for everybody.

3.   Global importance:
If we are to move forward as a nation and, indeed, a global community, a lot of the knowledge covered in HHD is imperative. Perhaps I was just super ignorant and naïve, but like, I didn’t even know that there existed goals for global development before studying the subject. So if you’re interested in making a difference by educating people in regard to global health, development and sustainability, then this subject’ll totally suit you. 8)

4.   A coherent structure:
Don’t like Maths? Great – HHD has no complex equations or formulas. Don’t like English? Good news here, too – HHD is not packed to the brim with essays or language analysis. Whilst it is a humanities subject, and whilst there are some longer questions (~6-8 marks, at most), Health & Human is very nicely structured. This applies to both organisation of content, which is learned in a logical progression of topics, and assessment questions, which can generally be answered in very similar ways. In fact, for a lot of questions, you can pretty much just plug information into a formula (but I promise it’s more interesting than that makes it sound). And don’t fret – as I’m sure the Class of 2016 would tell you, the way in which questions need to be answered will come with practice.

5.   Health 3/4 in Year 11:
If any students in Year 10 or below are presently reading this, I can only encourage you to consider Health as a 3/4 subject in Year 11. I don’t have experience in this, because I (regrettably) chose Business Management instead, but my advice is more general than that: subjects like HHD (and BusMan, if you’re that way inclined) are a great start to your Year 12 life. As I will touch on in a moment, none of the content in either of these subjects is particularly difficult to grasp, so it shouldn’t be too stressful an introduction. And please don’t worry too much about scaling.

Radical – so what does HHD actually cover?

Spoiler
Yeah, really solid question. HHD, of course, has two units (Unit 3 and Unit 4), each of which is divided into two Areas of Study. (If you’re confused with this terminology (of even if you’re not), you may like to read this thread: How VCE works). As you can see, Unit 3 focuses on Australia’s health, whilst Unit 4 is more concerned with global health.

Unit 3: Australia’s health
AOS 1: Understanding Australia’s health
AOS 1 includes: an overview of health (and its parts), and why it is important; the health of Australians compared with other nations; variations in health within Australia, and reasons for those variations; the National Health Priority Areas; and nutrition as a factor that influences health.

AOS 2: Promoting health in Australia
AOS 2 includes: different models of health, including models that the Australian Government has used (and uses) to guide its health policies; the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion; the role of VicHealth; Australia’s health system, including Medicare; the role of the Australian Government in promoting good health; and the role of non-government agencies in doing the same.

Unit 4: Global health and human development
AOS 1: Introducing global health and human development
AOS 1 includes: the distinction between developed and developing countries; sustainability and human development, and why they are important; factors that influence the discrepancy in health between Australia and other nations; the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

AOS 2: Promoting global health and human development
AOS 2 includes: the interrelationship between health, human development and sustainability; types of aid, and how and when they are used; the United Nations and its role in global health; the World Health Organisation; priorities of the Australian Government; programs focusing on literacy, food security, HIV/AIDS and malaria, immunisation, safe water and sanitation.

Some common questions

Spoiler
Legit every year, the same questions come up (understandably):

1.   I didn’t do HHD 1/2; can I still do well in HHD 3/4? Will I be disadvantaged?
Absolutely, you can still do well! I like to think my study score of 50, without having done HHD 1/2, demonstrates that nicely. Whilst knowledge from Units 1 and 2 would by no means harm your chances of doing well, it’s barely necessary. If you’re jumping into HHD 3/4 without 1/2, good on you! If you’re concerned about it, though, the one thing I would look at is definitions of health status indicators, and perhaps the dimensions and determinants of health. :)

2.   Is HHD is an easy subject?
Golly, this old chestnut.

Firstly, IMO there is no VCE subject that is “easy”, as such. I mean, doing well in any subject is hard, and requires dedication. You can’t just rock up to the HHD exam and ace it; I’m sure there are thousands of students out there who could tell you as such.

I stand by my statement that the content is not particularly difficult to grasp (although this is, of course, subjective); especially not in the same way that, say, Specialist Maths is difficult to grasp (I assume). But I really hate the “easy subject”/“hard subject” dichotomy; naturally, the “ease” or otherwise of any subject will change from person-to-person. And the reality is, there is a lot of content in this course: it is a “content-heavy” subject, and that takes a lot of work to perfect.

So even though each topic within HHD in isolation may not be particularly taxing, the sheer quantity of topics in the course renders HHD difficult in its own right (but perhaps in different ways to other subjets).

3.   Yooooo lmao HHD scales down by like a million; should I still do it?

In regard to scaling, my position is as follows: take subjects in which you’re interested (or, alternatively, that you need as prerequisites). In doing so, I think you’re giving yourself a much greater chance of success, even taking scaling into account (because objectively, Health does scale down more than a bunch of other subjects).

Choosing subjects can be hard, but here are some things not to factor heavily into your decision: what your friends are doing, what you think you ought do, what other people want you to do, and, most saliently, how the subject scales. And I mean, the higher you score in a subject, the less relevant scaling becomes – and you’re more likely to do well in subjects that you like. Every single one of my subjects scaled down aside from English Language, and I graduated with an ATAR of 99.65. I’m sure that had I studied subjects that scaled more favourably but about which I was less passionate, I would have done much, much worse.

And more importantly, studying subjects you enjoy will just make the whole thing a lot easier! ;D

What to expect

Spoiler
Your study score for Health will basically be the result of SACs and the exam, with the following proportions (and note that raw marks don’t really matter for SACs; again, see this thread for more):

-   Unit 3 SACs: 25%
-   Unit 4 SACs: 25%
-   End of year exam: 50%

    SACs – School Assessed Coursework – are determined by each individual school, so they can be presented in a variety of ways. However, they will generally be in the form of short-answer response tests. Questions might include definitions, data analysis, application of concepts to case studies, short answer (explain or outline) questions, or ‘longer’ (discuss or show) questions (typically on human development, sustainability, or a combination of the two (that is, sustainable human development)).

    The exam is very similar to the SACs. Section A (essentially Unit 3) and Section B (essentially Unit 4) combine to form an exam of roughly 100 marks. In general, Section B is slightly longer than Section A. This is unsurprising, because most of the longer questions tend to be in relation to concepts covered in Unit 4.

How to prepare for 2017

Spoiler
    On the assumption that you are planning on studying Health 3/4 next year (top notch choice), here are some things to consider tackling over the upcoming holiday period.

1.   Health status indicators definitions
The definitions of various health status indicators – life expectancy, incidence, prevalence, morbidity, mortality, disability-adjusted life years and burden of disease – pretty much permeate the entire course. And if the definitions themselves don’t, the concepts certainly do. Health status indicators are a really good thing to learn before the year starts, I think, because they apply to every Outcome of every Area of Study of every Unit. And considering that HHD is content-heavy, it’s probably best to get them out of the way early! ;)

2.   Peruse some of the primary concepts
Apart from the health status indicators, there is really no need to ‘study ahead’ of your class, IMO (but like, if you want to, then all the power to you!). If you want to prepare, then consider browsing some textbooks, Checkpoints, the study design, the Engage Wiki, previous exams or other resources to gain an understanding of some of the main concepts in the course. Key concepts that are covered relatively early include the National Health Priority Areas and nutrition.

3.   Be organised
Aside from coming back after the break fresh and enthusiastic, make sure you have everything you need ready. In terms of books, I used (I think) Cambridge, but I’m sure that all textbooks are adequate. I didn’t buy Checkpoints, but I was fortunate enough to have my teacher offer me hers for the year. If I were doing Health again, I would definitely buy myself a copy to use for SAC and exam preparation. Something else to consider is using two notebooks: one for notes in class, and another for SAC revision; the latter can then be used to prepare for the exam (#toptips).

4.   But most importantly
Please, please don’t burn out before the year even begins. Between Year 11 and Year 12, I backpacked through Asia, and missed most of the holidays. This is a matter of personal preference, but I preferred to treat my holidays as just that – a holiday. Here comes the old cliché: VCE is a marathon, not a sprint. You’ll need your holidays during the year for revision, so you might as well make the most of the Summer holiday period! ;D

How to get a 50 and all that shit

Spoiler
1.   Theory
We have established that Health is, at least from my experience, fairly content-heavy. As such, taking good notes is important. I didn’t have any close friends in my class (it’s okay, don’t feel bad), and I was thankful for that – it gave me an opportunity to really focus. Taking clear notes during class will save you a bundle of time later on, meaning that a) you don’t need to catch up on content before the exam; b) you don’t need to re-write your notes to make them legible; and c) you can focus on the jewel of all study techniques: practice exams.

2.   General revision
Ideally, by this point, you would have some kind of idea as to how you most effectively learn. But if you don’t (and don’t worry if you don’t), perhaps it’s time to start trying a few things (especially if you’re not going into Year 12 next year – the earlier you get that understanding, the easier you will learn in the future). I used a heap of study techniques during VCE, and I think this kept me from losing motivation. For example, I: did practice questions, both writing and speaking my responses; used rote learning for definitions; colour co-ordinated my notes; summarised paragraphs from the textbook into single sentences; turned content into songs and poems; related as much of the content as I could to other passions (primarily sport); taught family members (or, if unavailable, pets); made posters; used drawings to represent major concepts; and so on. There is no limit on creative ways in which you can study, and that really mixes things up nicely.

3.   Definitions
More specifically, Health encompasses quite a few definitions. By the end of the year, there are certainly many that you will need to know, preferably word-for-word, for the exam. Another modified cliché may be relevant here: a definition a day keeps the big, bad assessors away. By focusing on one or two definitions each day during the year, you will build your repertoire to the point that the overwhelming number of definitions needed is, well, no longer overwhelming.

4.   SACs/exam
General techniques for SACs and exams apply to Health as much as any other subject. Imagine that you are marking your own exam. You don’t want to have to trawl through responses to find the key points. As such, try to make it as easy as possible for whoever it is marking your exam to give you marks. Underline what you are defining, highlight key points, use names and statistics given in case studies in your responses, and do whatever else you can to show that you are directly answering each question.

5.   Use your resources
As I briefly mentioned earlier, Checkpoints is a great resource for SAC and exam revision; it has quality practice questions for each Area of Study and (I think) comes with sample responses, too. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or clarify concepts in class. When exam time came around, I liked to use the study design for each of my subjects. By taking each dot point, and trying to write as much as I could about that point, I a) revised content, practising how to explain concepts concisely and effectively; or b) worked out what I needed to study further. Very nifty and grouse.

6.   Look after yourself
My last piece of advice also happens to be the most important. If you’re struggling with anything at any time, please do yourself and your loved ones a favour, and reach out for help. BeyondBlue (P: 1300 22 4636) and Headspace (P: 03 9027 0100) are just two of the many organisations that specialise in the wellbeing of young people.

Conclusion

HHD is a wicked subject, and I highly recommend it to all. It’s relevant to everybody, and is a great stepping stone to further studies in a huge range of areas. But, of course, VCE is your own journey, and at the end of the day, you should follow your own gut feeling.

Be good!
Nick. :)


The original thread (posted late 2014)
Introduction

    I studied Health & Human Development in 2012, but I almost didn’t; HHD was my last-picked subject. It was also the subject about which I was most concerned, and the subject that gave me the most anxiety over the 2011/2012 break. But I am so very glad that I chose HHD, for it ended up being my favourite (and best) subject. In this thread, I will be aiming to give an account of not only why you should consider Health, but how you can succeed in it.

    I graduated at the end of 2012 with an ATAR of 99.65, and a 50 in Health (incidentally, you can find my tips on how to succeed in VCE here). I am currently studying (in a very liberal use of the word, considering that I am procrastinating from revision by writing this) at Monash University, double majoring in Linguistics and International Studies. Had I not done Health, I don’t think I would be doing as such. This year, I have been fortunate enough to tutor 3/4 Health, so my passion for the subject has continued to be fed.

    In this thread, I offer my services to answer any questions you may have in regard to HHD (or anything else, for that matter). But before that, let me present my very biased opinion on Health & Human Development as a Year 12 subject.

Why you should consider studying HHD as a VCE subject

    Below, I have listed some of the main reasons to consider studying HHD:

1.   Applicability:
There is little doubt in my mind that Health is one of the most applicable of the very many subjects available at VCE level. In the section below (‘Course overview’), I have given a brief description of each Area of Study (essentially taken from VCAA’s study design, found here). As you will see, the topics covered in Health & Human Development have obvious ‘real-word’ applications. Even very minor things may have an impact on your own life and the way that you live it; for example, learning about nutrition prompted me to make slight alterations to my diet (such increasing my consumption of fish). Further, the course is constantly updating to correspond with ‘actual’ changes. For example, a significant part of the course – AusAID – was replaced with DFAT as late as February this year, after the Abbott Government made the decision to abolish the former. Keep in mind that changes like this can occur when preparing for studies in HHD for next year and beyond.

2.   Careers:
Due to the wide range of applicability outlined in point 1, HHD can be a great source of knowledge for many careers. I know people (or know of, at least – I don’t know that many people!) who have undertaken Health, and are now studying Medicine, Law, Arts, Economics, Health Sciences, Accounting, Education, Design, and a range of other subjects in tertiary education. But in particular, I think HHD is a great stepping stone toward courses in Health Sciences, Human Rights Law, Medicine, Politics, Education and Global Governance. This point leads me to my next:

3.   Global importance:
A lot of the content covered in HHD is important for everybody to know, no matter who you are or what you do. A grasp of basic information regarding health and sustainability is imperative should we wish to move forward as a population. So if you’re interested in making a difference by educating people in regard to global health, this is a great opportunity to start your journey. Perhaps I was simply more ignorant than most, but before I studied HHD, I had no idea that goals for global development (the UN’s Millennium Development Goals), for example, even existed.

4.   A coherent structure:
Don’t like Maths? Great – HHD has no complex equations or formulas. Don’t like English? Good news here, too – HHD is not packed to the brim with essays or language analyses. Whilst it is a humanities subject, and whilst there are some longer questions (~6-8 marks, at most), the very nature of Health is very nicely structured. This applies to both organisation of content, which is learned in a logical progression of topics; and assessment questions, which can generally be answered in very similar ways. And don’t fret – as I’m sure the Class of 2014 would tell you, the way in which questions need to be answered will come with practice.

5.   Health 3/4 in Year 11:
If any students in Year 10 or below are presently reading this, I can only encourage you to consider Health as a 3/4 subject in Year 11. I don’t have experience in this, because I (regrettably) chose Business Management instead, but my advice is more general than that: subjects like HHD (and BusMan, if you’re that way inclined) are a great start to your Year 12 life. As I will touch on in a moment, none of the content in either of these subjects is particularly difficult to grasp, so it shouldn’t be too stressful an introduction.

Course overview

Unit 3: Australia’s health
AOS 1: Understanding Australia’s health
AOS 1 includes health, and why it is important; the health of Australians compared to other nations; variations in health within Australia, and reasons for those variations; the National Health Priority Areas; and nutrition as a factor that influences health.

AOS 2: Promoting health in Australia
AOS 2 includes different models of health, including models that the Australian Government has used (and uses) to guide its health policies; the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion; the role of VicHealth; Australia’s health system, including Medicare; the role of the Australian Government in promoting good health; and the role of non-government agencies in doing likewise.

Unit 4: Global health and human development
AOS 1: Introducing global health and human development
AOS 1 includes the distinction between developed and developing countries; sustainability and human development, and why they are important; factors that influence the discrepancy in health between Australia and other nations; the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals.

AOS 2: Promoting global health and human development
AOS 2 includes the interrelationship between health, human development and sustainability; types of aid, and how and when they are used; the United Nations and its role in global health; the World Health Organisation; priorities of the Australian Government; programs focusing on literacy, food security, HIV/AIDS and malaria, immunisation, safe water and sanitation.

Frequently asked questions
    In the following section, I would like to take the opportunity to respond to several ‘myths’ that seem to float around in regard to HHD. Every year, these concerns are raised, and I would hate for prospective students to not chose Health because of them.

1.   Is it possible to do well in Health 3/4 without the knowledge of Health 1/2?
Absolutely, it is! I like to think that my study score of 50 shows that. At the very beginning of this post, I mentioned that I was apprehensive about choosing Health. A large portion of that was due to the fact that I hadn’t done it in Year 11; nor had I even considered it. But whilst knowledge from Units 1 and 2 would by no means harm your chances of doing well in Units 3 and 4, that knowledge is certainly not critical. The only area in which I felt slightly – and I emphasise that this was very slight – behind was definitions that carried over from the Year 11 equivalent. I will address this issue further in the ‘How to prepare for 2015’ section below.

2.   Is HHD is an easy subject?
I have said that none of the content is particularly difficult to grasp, and I stand by that. However, I hate the idea that there are such things as ‘hard’ and ‘easy’ subjects; naturally, this will be contingent on each individual’s tastes and how they function. The ‘ease’ (again, this is subjective) of content understanding is more than made up for by the sheer quantity of content in the course. There is no doubt that HHD is a content-heavy subject – sometimes, even remembering all of the mnemonics for the content is difficult – and then you need to be able to apply that information to questions and case studies. So, even though each topic in isolation is not particularly taxing, the quantity of topics in the course renders HHD difficult in its own right.

3.   Health scales down a lot. Considering that factor, is it still worth doing?
In regard to scaling, my position is as follows. Do subjects that you like or think you may be interested in. In doing so, I think you are giving yourself a much greater chance of success. Good reasons to choose particular subjects in VCE do not include: what your friends are doing; what you think you ought to do; what other people want to do; and, most saliently, how it scales. Every single one of my subjects (bar English Language, which scaled up by one) scaled down, and some of them significantly. But if you do well enough in any subject, scaling is rendered entirely irrelevant. Had I taken Chemistry, for example, my study score would have scaled up, but by virtue of me not liking Chem, I am sure that my study score (even after scaling) would have been much lower. More importantly, doing what you like is important for your mental health in what is often a tough year, and that is by far the most important thing to consider.

What to expect
Your study score for Health will be comprised in the following fashion:
-   Unit 3 SACs: 25%
-   Unit 4 SACs: 25%
-   End of year exams: 50%

    SACs – School Assessed Coursework – are determined by each individual school, so they can be presented in a variety of ways. However, they will generally be in the form of short-answer response tests. Questions might include definitions, data analysis, application of concepts to case studies, short answer (explain or outline) questions, or ‘longer’ (discuss or show) questions (typically on human development, sustainability, or a combination of the two (sustainable human development)).

    The exam* is very similar to the SACs. Section A (essentially Unit 3) and Section B (essentially Unit 4) combine to form an exam of roughly 100 marks.** In general, Section B is slightly longer than Section A. This is unsurprising, because most of the longer questions tend to be in relation to concepts covered in Unit 4.

*This is possibly poorly timed; apologies and good luck to any present students about to tackle the exam!
** There is a new study design for 2014, so I’m not sure if this will remain the same. From what I gather, the study design only changed minimally, so I expect that the structure of the exam will be, at least primarily, consistent with what it has been in the past.

How to prepare for 2015

    On the assumption that you are planning on studying Health 3/4 next year, here are some things to consider doing over the upcoming holiday period.

1.   Health status indicators definitions
The definitions of various health status indicators – life expectancy, incidence, prevalence, morbidity, mortality, disability-adjusted life years and burden of disease – were, really, the only advantage that my cohort had over me from completing Units 1/2. And considering that I learned these in the holidays, they didn’t have much of an advantage at all. Health status indicators are a really good thing to learn before the year starts, I think, because they apply to every Outcome of every Area of Study of every Unit. And considering that HHD is content-heavy, it’s probably best to get them out of the way early.

2.   Peruse main concepts
Apart from the health status indicators, there is really no need to ‘study ahead’ of your class, in my opinion. If you want to prepare, then consider browsing some textbooks, Checkpoints, the study design, previous exams or other resources to gain an understanding of some of the main concepts in the course. Key concepts that are covered relatively early include the National Health Priority Areas and nutrition.

3.   Be organised
Aside from coming back after the break fresh and enthusiastic, make sure you have everything you need ready. In terms of books, I used (I think) Cambridge, but I’m sure that all textbooks are adequate. I didn’t buy Checkpoints, but I was fortunate enough to have my teacher offer me hers for the year. If I were doing Health again, I would definitely buy myself a copy to use for SAC and exam preparation. Something else to consider is using two notebooks – one for notes in class, and another for SAC revision; the latter can then be used to prepare for the exam.

4.   But most importantly:
Don’t burn out before the year even begins. Between Year 11 and Year 12, I backpacked through Asia, and missed most of the holidays. This is a matter of personal preference, but I preferred to treat my holidays as just that – a holiday. Here comes the old cliché: VCE is a marathon, not a sprint. You’ll need your holidays during the year for revision, so you might as well make the most of the Summer holiday period!

How to succeed

1.   Theory
We have established that Health is, at least from my experience, fairly content-heavy. As such, taking good notes is important. I didn’t have any close friends in my class, and I was thankful for that – it gave me an opportunity to really focus. Taking clear notes during class will save you a bundle of time later on, meaning that a) you don’t need to catch up on content before the exam; b) you don’t need to re-write your notes to make them legible; and c) you can focus on the jewel of all study techniques – practice exams.

2.   General revision
Ideally, by this point, you would have some kind of idea as to how you most effectively learn. However, if you don’t, perhaps it’s time to start trying a few things (especially if you’re not going into Year 12 next year – the earlier you get that understanding, the easier you will learn in the future). I used a nimiety of study techniques during VCE, and I think this kept me from losing motivation. For example, I: did practice questions, both writing and speaking my responses; used rote learning for definitions; colour co-ordinated my notes; summarised paragraphs from the textbook into single sentences; turned content into songs and poems; related as much of the content as I could to other passions (primarily sport); taught family members (or, if unavailable, pets); made posters; used drawings to represent major concepts; and so on. There is no limit on creative ways in which you can study.

3.   Definitions
More specifically, Health encompasses quite a few definitions. By the end of the year, there are certainly many that you will need to know (ideally) for the exam. Another modified cliché may be relevant here: a definition a day keeps the big, bad assessors away. By focusing on one or two definitions each day during the year, you will build your repertoire to the point that the overwhelming number of definitions needed is no longer overwhelming.

4.   SACs/exam
General techniques for SACs and exams apply to Health as much as any other subject. Imagine that you are marking your own exam. You don’t want to have to trawl through responses to find the key points. As such, try to make it easy for whoever it is marking your exam to give you marks. Underline what you are defining, highlight key points, use names and statistics given in case studies in your responses, and do whatever else you can to show that you are directly answering each question.

5.   Use your resources
As I briefly mentioned earlier, Checkpoints is a great resource for SAC and exam revision; it has quality practice questions for each Area of Study and (I think) comes with sample responses, too. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or clarify concepts in class. When exam time came around, I liked to use the study design for each of my subjects. My taking each dot point, and trying to write as much as I could about that point, I a) revised content, practising how to explain concepts concisely and well; or b) worked out what I needed to study further.

6.   Look after yourself
My last piece of advice also happens to be the most important. If you’re struggling with anything at any time, please do yourself and your loved ones a favour, and reach out for help. BeyondBlue (P: 1300 22 4636) and Headspace (P: 03 9027 0100) are just two of the many organisations that specialise in the wellbeing of young people.

Conclusion

    I truly believe that Health & Human Development is a fantastic VCE subject, relevant to everybody, and a great stepping stone to further studies in a huge range of areas. But keep in mind that this thread is full of opinions of only one person and, whilst I encourage you to consider HHD as a subject, I don’t want to influence you too heavily. After all, VCE is your own journey.

    I wish you all the best of luck, whether you are just about to finish your studies in HHD, plan on studying Health in the future, or otherwise. As per the ‘Introduction’ section, I am more than happy to do my best to respond to any questions that you may have either in the lead-up to or during 2015.

Kind regards,
Nick. :)
« Last Edit: December 19, 2016, 06:21:24 pm by Joseph41 »

Oxford comma, Garamond, Avett Brothers, Orla Gartland enthusiast.

walkec

  • Guest
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2014, 07:09:44 pm »
+4
Even though I am yet to sit the HHD exam, I wholeheartedly concur with Joesph41's points about why you should choose HHD.
If you didn't like 1/2, don't fret. 3/4 is far more applicable and interesting that 1/2 ever will be. In HHD you learn about so many things that are useful to you as a young adult, like how Medicare and Private Health Insurance works to name a couple.

I honestly think if I hadn't have chosen the subject, I would not be considering studying a Health Science course next year. I feel as though HHD really gives you great insight into why people may choose to act in certain ways, and due to this it gives you great understanding for other people of different background. That's a sort of skill that can get you a long way.

It's also not all that difficult to do well in HHD if you just try a little bit extra.

evawu

  • Victorian
  • Trendsetter
  • **
  • Posts: 130
  • Respect: +1
  • School Grad Year: 2015
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2014, 09:10:08 pm »
+4
I agree! Health was also my last-picked subject (for my first 3/4). But I think choosing health was one of the best decisions I've ever made :) After VCE i think i might like to take a gap year and work/volunteer at an NGO or an international organisation.

BTW JOSEPH, you're actually a huge inspiration to me (random, but serious!) hahaha
2014: Health
2015: English Language | Biology | PE | Chem | Methods

geminii

  • Victorian
  • Forum Leader
  • ****
  • Posts: 787
  • Do or do not, there is no try.
  • Respect: +42
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2014, 10:11:35 pm »
+4
I just chose HHD 1/2 for year 10 because of a clash in my subject choices - I didn't want to do it but then ended up picking it over geography. It sound like from what you've said that I've made a good choice! I've decided that if I like it I'll continue with HHD 3/4 in year 11, but I'm not sure about that yet.
:D
« Last Edit: May 10, 2015, 07:55:31 pm by AceVCE777 »
"If you win silver, sooner or later, you will be forgotten. If you win gold, you will be an example, and examples are given, not forgotten."
- Dangal


2016-17 (VCE): Biology, HHD, English, Methods, Specialist, Chemistry
2018-22: Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering (Honours) / Bachelor of Biomedical Science @ Monash Uni

2019 MEC2404 | ENG2005 | BMS1042 | BMS1062

lucas.vang

  • Victorian
  • Trendsetter
  • **
  • Posts: 141
  • Respect: +1
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2014, 11:12:57 pm »
+3
Wow, CONGRATULATIONS!! that's really impressive!!

can I ask..  what did you get on your sacs and the exam?

:)

Smiley_

  • Victorian
  • Forum Leader
  • ****
  • Posts: 842
  • Respect: +147
  • School Grad Year: 2013
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2014, 08:44:44 am »
+3
Love this post! (Almost as much as I love Health!)


Added to the resource thread :)
Best wishes for your upcoming exams.
« Last Edit: October 31, 2014, 10:02:48 am by Smiley_ »

Joseph41

  • Administrator
  • Great Wonder of ATAR Notes
  • *****
  • Posts: 10655
  • Respect: +7378
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2014, 12:23:26 pm »
+3
Even though I am yet to sit the HHD exam, I wholeheartedly concur with Joesph41's points about why you should choose HHD.
If you didn't like 1/2, don't fret. 3/4 is far more applicable and interesting that 1/2 ever will be. In HHD you learn about so many things that are useful to you as a young adult, like how Medicare and Private Health Insurance works to name a couple.

I honestly think if I hadn't have chosen the subject, I would not be considering studying a Health Science course next year. I feel as though HHD really gives you great insight into why people may choose to act in certain ways, and due to this it gives you great understanding for other people of different background. That's a sort of skill that can get you a long way.

It's also not all that difficult to do well in HHD if you just try a little bit extra.

Great points, walkec! The course really benefited me, teaching me a lot of things that I thought I probably should know, but didn't, for whatever reason. Medicare and private health insurance are fantastic examples of that.

I agree! Health was also my last-picked subject (for my first 3/4). But I think choosing health was one of the best decisions I've ever made :) After VCE i think i might like to take a gap year and work/volunteer at an NGO or an international organisation.

BTW JOSEPH, you're actually a huge inspiration to me (random, but serious!) hahaha

I'm glad you have enjoyed Health! And thank you very much for those kind words - that is lovely to hear. :)

I just chose HHD 1/2 for year 10 because of a clash in my subject choices - I didn't want to do it but then ended up picking it over geography. It sound like from what you've said that I've made a good choice! I've decided that if I like it I'll continue with HHD 3/4 in year 10, but I'm not sure about that yet.
:D

Yes, perhaps that will be a blessing in disguise. I do want to make it clear that I'm not telling you to choose HHD, but to consider it. I think Health sometimes comes with the stigma of being 'easy', so people may avoid it for that reason. I think that that is misguided.

Being in Year 9, you are in a fantastic position to see how you find Health next year, and then run with your gut feeling. You could always pick up Geography next year, too.

Wow, CONGRATULATIONS!! that's really impressive!!

can I ask..  what did you get on your sacs and the exam?

:)

Hi Lucas, thanks very much!

I can't remember what I scored for my SACs, but I was probably sitting on roughly 95% for both units. More importantly, I held the number one rank within my cohort, going into the exam. I also scored an A+ on the exam. But as I often say, comparing exam and (especially) SAC marks is very difficult, so those marks must be taken with a grain of salt.

Love this post! (Almost as much as I love Health!)


Added to the resource thread :)
Best wishes for your upcoming exams.

Thanks, Smiley! Always great to hear from you - your input to this board does not go unnoticed.

Oxford comma, Garamond, Avett Brothers, Orla Gartland enthusiast.

geminii

  • Victorian
  • Forum Leader
  • ****
  • Posts: 787
  • Do or do not, there is no try.
  • Respect: +42
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2015, 07:59:04 pm »
0
Hi everyone :)

Just found this thread again after my long stay away from ATAR Notes (been really busy), and I was just wondering as to how is everyone going with HHD? Im doing 1/2 this year, I absolutely love it, and I can't wait to get my RealCare Baby next term ;D
"If you win silver, sooner or later, you will be forgotten. If you win gold, you will be an example, and examples are given, not forgotten."
- Dangal


2016-17 (VCE): Biology, HHD, English, Methods, Specialist, Chemistry
2018-22: Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering (Honours) / Bachelor of Biomedical Science @ Monash Uni

2019 MEC2404 | ENG2005 | BMS1042 | BMS1062

Joseph41

  • Administrator
  • Great Wonder of ATAR Notes
  • *****
  • Posts: 10655
  • Respect: +7378
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2015, 11:58:56 am »
+1
Hi everyone :)

Just found this thread again after my long stay away from ATAR Notes (been really busy), and I was just wondering as to how is everyone going with HHD? Im doing 1/2 this year, I absolutely love it, and I can't wait to get my RealCare Baby next term ;D

Thanks for the bump! This is good timing for any prospective students for next year.

If I did HHD 1/2, I would add to the opening post by writing a similar guide. Unfortunately, I didn't. What are everybody's experiences with the RealCare Babies? I've heard mixed reports.

Oxford comma, Garamond, Avett Brothers, Orla Gartland enthusiast.

geminii

  • Victorian
  • Forum Leader
  • ****
  • Posts: 787
  • Do or do not, there is no try.
  • Respect: +42
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2015, 07:02:42 pm »
0
Thanks for the bump! This is good timing for any prospective students for next year.

If I did HHD 1/2, I would add to the opening post by writing a similar guide. Unfortunately, I didn't. What are everybody's experiences with the RealCare Babies? I've heard mixed reports.

I know people that have called RealCare Babies 'cute,' and others that have called them 'demons'. They do wake up every hour or so and demand that you care for them, which can get pretty draining for three nights in a row.
If anyone wants to see what it's like to care for a RealCare Baby for just one night, check out this video. Warning: it may put you off the assignment, but it's hilarious and I'm not bothered by it. I think it'll be heaps of fun. ;D
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRKvl0xrcFQ
"If you win silver, sooner or later, you will be forgotten. If you win gold, you will be an example, and examples are given, not forgotten."
- Dangal


2016-17 (VCE): Biology, HHD, English, Methods, Specialist, Chemistry
2018-22: Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering (Honours) / Bachelor of Biomedical Science @ Monash Uni

2019 MEC2404 | ENG2005 | BMS1042 | BMS1062

The Brightest Witch

  • Victorian
  • Trendsetter
  • **
  • Posts: 153
  • Respect: 0
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2015, 04:40:55 pm »
0
Thanks for the bump! This is good timing for any prospective students for next year.

If I did HHD 1/2, I would add to the opening post by writing a similar guide. Unfortunately, I didn't. What are everybody's experiences with the RealCare Babies? I've heard mixed reports.

My baby woke up heaps and all, but it was pretty easy to sort of just systematically try your options (put the milk on its mouth, burp it, hold it and rock it sort of, or finally change the nappy) until it stopped crying. And if it didn't, I'd just leave it to run out of cry.

My biggest problem was the smell. It was like old baby powder and nappies. I'm interested to know if all the babies came with that smell, or it's just a thing my teacher did? It was particularly horrible 'cause I was sick that weekend and just wanted to hurl every time I held that child.
VCE: English, Health, Legal, Psych, Further, Chem
2015: Arts/Law @ Monash

Guys I only doubled with Arts because I couldn't let go of Psych and wanted to keep doing it as a major at least, but I took International Studies on a whim after the info session just because I needed a minor, and I love it so much! It's 3:29am and I had to share this, I think I'm majoring in it bye.

keshiaaickin

  • Victorian
  • Fresh Poster
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Respect: 0
  • School Grad Year: 2016
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #11 on: September 08, 2015, 11:37:15 pm »
0
Hey, this question isn't exactly content related but I'm averaging about 90-93% in my SACs (got 100% in one) and think I'll get around 90+% in my exam. I think I'm around the top few in my class with my marks and I was wondering what raw study score you think these marks would translate to?
Thank you!!!! :D

Joseph41

  • Administrator
  • Great Wonder of ATAR Notes
  • *****
  • Posts: 10655
  • Respect: +7378
Re: [50 in HHD] Health & Human Development in 2015 and beyond
« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2016, 06:22:12 pm »
+2
*** OPENING POST UPDATED FOR 2017 ***

Hey, this question isn't exactly content related but I'm averaging about 90-93% in my SACs (got 100% in one) and think I'll get around 90+% in my exam. I think I'm around the top few in my class with my marks and I was wondering what raw study score you think these marks would translate to?
Thank you!!!! :D

And this is 14 months late, but I'm so sorry for not getting back to you!

Oxford comma, Garamond, Avett Brothers, Orla Gartland enthusiast.