Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

December 12, 2019, 12:25:37 am

Author Topic: Neurons in memory formation  (Read 535 times)  Share 

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

anna.xo

  • No exam discussion
  • Part of the furniture
  • *
  • Posts: 1152
  • Respect: +47
  • School Grad Year: 2014
Neurons in memory formation
« on: July 10, 2014, 08:49:53 pm »
0
A few questions about the role of neurons in memory formation;

1. What are synaptic connections ?
2. For the role of synapses, is it correct to say that this is where communication between neurons occurs ?
3. When neurons communicate with each other, do synaptic connections form ?

Much thanks in advance :)
2014: VCE
2015: Bachelor of Nutrition Science @ Monash University

Starlight

  • Victorian
  • ATAR Notes Superstar
  • ******
  • Posts: 2955
  • Respect: +275
Re: Neurons in memory formation
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2014, 01:21:01 am »
+1
Hi, this is mainly my knowledge from my university notes- it might be in a bit too much detail :)

1. A connection between two neurons so that information/ a signal can be passed from one neuron to the next. I think VCE only looks at chemical synapses (there are also electrical synapses). Chemical synapses are mainly connections between axon terminals (terminal= end of the axon)  to dendrites (dendrites= branches that are the starting point of neurons) of i.e. axon terminal of one neuron to a dendrite of another neuron. It can also be a connection between axon to cell body, axon to axon and dendrite to dendrite (just a bit of extra info). In terms of how a chemical synapse works, you can look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_synapse... But these are probably the main points that are good to know:

1. Neuron one undergoes an action potential
2. Neuron one's action potential is received at the axon terminal
3. Neuron one has neurotransmitter particles diffused out of its synaptic vesicles into the synaptic cleft
4. The neurotransmitter particles from neuron one bind to specific receptors onto neuron two
5. Depending on the types of receptors to which the neurotransmitter binds, neuron two either is:
a) Inhibited and so will be less likely to fire an AP and release neurotransmitter onto another neuron (so it is less likely to excite and cause an AP OR inhibit another neuron)
b) Excited and so will be more likely fire an action potential (and if it does fire an AP the cycle repeats again from step 1)

2. In terms of chemical synapses, it is so a chemical signal can be passed from one neuron to another neuron. When a neuron receives this chemical signal (i.e. upon neurotransmitter binding to its receptors) it will either be more (i.e. when it receives an excitatory signal) or less likely (i.e. when it receives an inhibitory signal) to fire an AP and release neurotransmitter onto another neuron.

3. Yes via either chemical or electrical synapses.


Hope this helps, remember it is probably in a bit more detail than what you would need to know.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2014, 01:23:50 am by El2012 »
2012-2014. BSc: Neuroscience. University of Melbourne.
2015-2018. Doctor of Optometry. University of Melbourne.

Unlikely to respond to any PMs these days.

anna.xo

  • No exam discussion
  • Part of the furniture
  • *
  • Posts: 1152
  • Respect: +47
  • School Grad Year: 2014
Re: Neurons in memory formation
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2014, 11:20:54 am »
+1
Hi, this is mainly my knowledge from my university notes- it might be in a bit too much detail :)

1. A connection between two neurons so that information/ a signal can be passed from one neuron to the next. I think VCE only looks at chemical synapses (there are also electrical synapses). Chemical synapses are mainly connections between axon terminals (terminal= end of the axon)  to dendrites (dendrites= branches that are the starting point of neurons) of i.e. axon terminal of one neuron to a dendrite of another neuron. It can also be a connection between axon to cell body, axon to axon and dendrite to dendrite (just a bit of extra info). In terms of how a chemical synapse works, you can look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_synapse... But these are probably the main points that are good to know:

1. Neuron one undergoes an action potential
2. Neuron one's action potential is received at the axon terminal
3. Neuron one has neurotransmitter particles diffused out of its synaptic vesicles into the synaptic cleft
4. The neurotransmitter particles from neuron one bind to specific receptors onto neuron two
5. Depending on the types of receptors to which the neurotransmitter binds, neuron two either is:
a) Inhibited and so will be less likely to fire an AP and release neurotransmitter onto another neuron (so it is less likely to excite and cause an AP OR inhibit another neuron)
b) Excited and so will be more likely fire an action potential (and if it does fire an AP the cycle repeats again from step 1)

2. In terms of chemical synapses, it is so a chemical signal can be passed from one neuron to another neuron. When a neuron receives this chemical signal (i.e. upon neurotransmitter binding to its receptors) it will either be more (i.e. when it receives an excitatory signal) or less likely (i.e. when it receives an inhibitory signal) to fire an AP and release neurotransmitter onto another neuron.

3. Yes via either chemical or electrical synapses.


Hope this helps, remember it is probably in a bit more detail than what you would need to know.

Thanks so much for that ! So helpful !
2014: VCE
2015: Bachelor of Nutrition Science @ Monash University