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December 05, 2021, 12:04:34 pm

Author Topic: 50 in English, available for queries :)  (Read 273061 times)  Share 

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yang_dong

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #570 on: October 12, 2014, 02:54:22 pm »
0
I have difficulty expanding my interruptations:
"women are scavenging for battle relics where the men have fallen''
suggests that women clean up after men, but I can't really form an argument or contention from that... i dunno what else I can infer from this about the role of women? maloufs ransom?

vizard12

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #571 on: October 12, 2014, 07:17:30 pm »
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Was wondering if you had any good recourses for Wuthering Heights?
Thanks

kandinsky

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #572 on: October 12, 2014, 08:30:23 pm »
+4
Was wondering if you had any good recourses for Wuthering Heights?
Thanks

Here's a (somewhat motley) collection of journal article ideas about Wuthering Heights.

Hope it helps a bit.

katiesaliba

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #573 on: October 13, 2014, 07:02:04 pm »
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Hi Lauren,

I struggle with context because I can never seem to find substantial arguments or really just conceptualise the prompt. I'm fine with text response and LA because the ideas raised are more obvious, but context is just too vague for my liking. Every time I write a context piece, my ideas either diverge too much from the prompt or they're too boring. I'm struggling to find inspiration, I suppose. Articulation of ideas just doesn't come naturally for context  :-\ It's frustrating because my other two pieces are normally fairly apt too! My writing style is analytical and cynical, so I prefer expository or persuasive pieces. I find writing persuasively more refreshing, but I just lack the ideas... I don't understand how I can be so incompetent in one style! I really want to tie historical examples into my piece, but I'm not sure how to coherently get examples of medieval prejudice to relate to 1950s western society! Also, is referencing Disney okay? Thank you :)
« Last Edit: October 13, 2014, 07:12:35 pm by katiesaliba »
Bachelor of Science (Immunology major) - The University of Melbourne

Yacoubb

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #574 on: October 15, 2014, 10:07:03 am »
0
This is really for anyone doing The Lot: In Words for context, but does anyone know of any articles that delves into the concept of fantasy in the book? I can't seem to find out and I'm trying to write a fantasy piece, it's driving me insane.

Thanks :-)

AmericanBeauty

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #575 on: October 15, 2014, 04:29:58 pm »
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Hi Lauren,

I'm really terrible at Language Analysis and haven't really started studying it because I don't know where to start. I read your explanation but I'm just don't have the apt for it.

Do you have 3-4 paragraphs which are surrounding 3-4 ideas. You are identifying what techniques have been used by the author in attempting to persuade the audience about the issue, and whether it is calling for a change in behaviour on the readers behalf? Then if there is more than one text, you contrast the ideas among the different texts and saying how each is attempting to persuade the audience. Is that about it?

j_820

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #576 on: October 15, 2014, 07:39:16 pm »
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Hey Lauren,
I was wondering if it would be useful to take Literature with English?
Do the two subjects ever overlap? Or would taking two English subjects be too confusing (so is it easy to mistake the writing style of one subject with the writing style for the other)?
Thank you in advance!

walkec

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #577 on: October 15, 2014, 08:10:24 pm »
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Hey Lauren,
I was wondering if it would be useful to take Literature with English?
Do the two subjects ever overlap? Or would taking two English subjects be too confusing (so is it easy to mistake the writing style of one subject with the writing style for the other)?
Thank you in advance!

As someone who takes both, I would strongly advise doing so  :)
I really feel like the skills from Literature have helped me score very well in English this year.
It can be a lot of work doing both at once, but I really think it does pay off in the long run.
The writing styles in Literature are very different to English, so I don't think it is easy to get the two mixed up.

Literature is looking more at the specifics of language but English is doing this but also on a broader scale too.

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #578 on: October 16, 2014, 01:48:30 pm »
+6
I struggle with context because I can never seem to find substantial arguments or really just conceptualise the prompt. I'm fine with text response and LA because the ideas raised are more obvious, but context is just too vague for my liking. Every time I write a context piece, my ideas either diverge too much from the prompt or they're too boring. I'm struggling to find inspiration, I suppose. Articulation of ideas just doesn't come naturally for context  :-\ It's frustrating because my other two pieces are normally fairly apt too! My writing style is analytical and cynical, so I prefer expository or persuasive pieces. I find writing persuasively more refreshing, but I just lack the ideas... I don't understand how I can be so incompetent in one style! I really want to tie historical examples into my piece, but I'm not sure how to coherently get examples of medieval prejudice to relate to 1950s western society! Also, is referencing Disney okay? Thank you :)
You can be relatively analytical in context, you just have to find way to do what suits you while still fulfilling the criteria. The somewhat sloppy analogy I've been using recently is that each paragraph is like an upside down McDonald's 'M.' Or any upside down M for that matter... or a W...
Anyway: when you start your paragraph, you're dealing with abstract (prompt-related) ideas. As always, there are exceptions; I occasionally liked to mess with things and throw in a snappy example to kick things off, then worked back around to the meaning and the context, but we'll deal with the general rule for now, then you can experiment as you see fit. Then gradually, you 'zoom-in' to a specific instance that demonstrates your point. This is the first 'dip' in the arch and the amount of highly-specific information you include should be pretty low. After this, you start zooming back out again and extrapolating a 'point' that will form the mid-point. This won't be as general as the starts and ends of your paragraphs, but it'll form a good connection between your examples.
Note: not every paragraph has to have two, some can have one, some can have 5, but again, this is just a basic format.
Zoom in again to a connecting idea, and then begin the process of drawing a 'big-picture' conclusion from your entire discusion thusfar.
Also note: I've picked 'M'/'W' as an example and not 'O.' While your points are returning to the same level/height, it's not coming back to exactly the same place. There should be some sense of progression in your piece, it's not as simple as
Conflict occurs when people are afraid. --> This can be seen when >character< did >action< and said >words.< Therefore we can conclude that conflict happens when people are afraid.
Instead try:
Conflict occurs when people are afraid. --> Fear is a major motivator for mankind.  --> It often dictates our actions in the heat of the moment. --> This can be seen as far back as medieval society when ...example --> That's not to say this is a concept confined to the annals of history, in fact such events have a modern day parallel in ...example --> But in each of these cases, upon retrospective reflection, people were able to admit their mistakes. --> Therefore, without fear restricting our capacity for logical and/or compassionate thought, we may even be capable of conquering a conflict.
These are all really generalisable, and of course you'd be cleverer in unpacking the prompt and clarifying key terms. In general though, so long as your examples are relevant and have clear connections to your discussion, anything goes, even Disney. Just be careful not to assume Beauty and the Beast is a waterproof indictment of the universal human condition; some sort of disclaimer about the fact that it's a fictional representation of emotion might be necessary :)

This is really for anyone doing The Lot: In Words for context, but does anyone know of any articles that delves into the concept of fantasy in the book? I can't seem to find out and I'm trying to write a fantasy piece, it's driving me insane.
There's a cool article from Leunig here if you just need a starting point to launch into a wider discussion of fantasy. Otherwise, you might just have to latch onto an idea in the text and construct your own fantasy around it, making connections as you go.

I'm really terrible at Language Analysis and haven't really started studying it because I don't know where to start. I read your explanation but I'm just don't have the apt for it.

Do you have 3-4 paragraphs which are surrounding 3-4 ideas. You are identifying what techniques have been used by the author in attempting to persuade the audience about the issue, and whether it is calling for a change in behaviour on the readers behalf? Then if there is more than one text, you contrast the ideas among the different texts and saying how each is attempting to persuade the audience. Is that about it?
Go through the L.A. links at the start of this thread, there are a variety of breakdowns in response to questions asked previously.

I was wondering if it would be useful to take Literature with English?
Do the two subjects ever overlap? Or would taking two English subjects be too confusing (so is it easy to mistake the writing style of one subject with the writing style for the other)?
In my experience, Lit helps with English, but it doesn't work the other way. There's a much higher standard required in Lit. and the way you analyse passages is a hell of a lot more detailed than a standard language analysis. It's fairly easy to keep the styles separate since the essay formats are pretty different. If you're in Year 10 at the moment then I would strongly advise picking up Lit because the new English course (class of '16 and beyond) is much closer to the current Lit. design than the current English one.
There's no huge advantage, but the general consensus is that Lit is way more enjoyable for the literarily (?) inclined than English, so let your interests guide your subject selection more than any possible advantage in combinations :)

magneto

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #579 on: October 16, 2014, 08:20:47 pm »
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what's that word that sort says: the bad times in life? learn to live on?

like it is inevitable in life to experience these bad times, but we just have to learn to live on?


thank you
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 08:27:09 pm by magneto »

walkec

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #580 on: October 16, 2014, 08:29:02 pm »
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what's that word that sort says: the bad times in life? learn to live on?

like it is inevitable in life to experience these bad times, but we just have to learn to live on?


thank you

persevere?

Saikyo

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #581 on: October 16, 2014, 11:30:28 pm »
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Hi Lauren,

I'm really terrible at Language Analysis and haven't really started studying it because I don't know where to start. I read your explanation but I'm just don't have the apt for it.

Do you have 3-4 paragraphs which are surrounding 3-4 ideas. You are identifying what techniques have been used by the author in attempting to persuade the audience about the issue, and whether it is calling for a change in behaviour on the readers behalf? Then if there is more than one text, you contrast the ideas among the different texts and saying how each is attempting to persuade the audience. Is that about it?

The main thing you should talk about in Language analysis is to analyse how the writer positions the readers in getting a reaction or response out of the issue and contention of the piece; prominently through persuasive techniques and appeals that sway them to agree/support the author's point of view. A simple example is when a reader sees statistics in an opinion piece that supports the author's view that is from a credible source; ask yourself why would they be convinced by this? How does the use of a credible source such (Australian bureau of statistics) make the arguements by the author seem valid to the reader. This is probably the hardest part of language analysis since you need to be a bit creative in having yourself be "in their shoes" of the reader when reading the article. If you can pull this off then it's not hard to pull off a good score. However, what separates the best students is they avoid listing "generic" intended effects like "the author would feel sad, angry, etc." and they mention more on within the context of the actual issue.

Also important to use what I like to call "QAI" method (helps me remember how to structure body paragraphs) which is Quote which is embedding examples from piece, Analyse the persuasive technique and then Intended effect as I explained above.

I'm sure other very good english students in this forum have a better way to do this :)
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 11:37:53 pm by Saikyo »

Gutthi

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #582 on: October 16, 2014, 11:42:56 pm »
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Hey Guys, I saw that this is a thread for English Queries. I am really uncomfortable writing Section C Analysis and I would like your feedback on it. (It is at SECTION C FEEDBACK PLEASE (NEW ONE JUST POSTED AT THE END - UNMARKED)    (The last one) )

I know that I have requested for feedback on this piece quite often, however please feel free to give me feedback and check my essay whenever you are free. I only wanted to put it out there so that more people know that it is there for marking.

Again, I am really sorry for having asked so many volunteers (also through pm) for marking this, however, the quicker I can get feedback, the quicker I hope to work on it. I hope you understand me :)

I am just really stuffed for this section specially, because our Teachers are very busy marking other essays, and they can't get to everyone on time, so I thought I should also post it here so that anyone who is available can give me feedback on it.

Thankyou everyone :)
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 11:45:37 pm by Gutthi »

Blondie21

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #583 on: October 17, 2014, 09:07:29 pm »
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Hey Lauren - or anyone - I know that you probably haven't studied this text but does my intro sound like it links to the essay topic??

“The male characters in Harwood’s poetry embody all the attributes that Harwood finds contemptible”

Gwen Harwood, one of Australia’s finest poets, delves into a range of subjects as she experiments with voice and play of language which is often underpinned with satirical wit. Harwood castigates both genders through her poetry as she believes they are both equally responsible for the deplorable aspects of modern day. However, despite the strong feministic core of her poetry, Harwood recognises that men exemplify attributes that she herself advocates. Despite such intentions, it can be seen that Harwood collates a critical response in regard to the chasm that divides the worlds of men and women, with her sympathies resting with the female population.

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24bauer12

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #584 on: October 17, 2014, 10:03:30 pm »
+5
“The male characters in Harwood’s poetry embody all the attributes that Harwood finds contemptible”

Gwen Harwood, one of Australia’s finest poets,This is probably not the best way to add an element of the author's historical background into the introduction. Instead, it may be more prudent to consider societal zeitgeists and whether the text acts as a social commentary. Consider if the poetry is a commentary about the subservience of woman. delves into a range of subjects as she experiments with voice and play of language which is often underpinned with satirical wit.It is good that you are providing information pertaining to the language style of the poetry. :) Harwood castigates both genders through her poetry as she believes they are both equally responsible for the deplorable aspects of modern day society You may want to be more specific and more concise. However, despite the strong feministic core of her poetry, Harwood recognises that men exemplify attributes that she herself advocates.It is good that you are challenging the topic and acknowledging that the author's view of society is multifaceted. Despite such intentions, it can be seen that Harwood collates a critical response in regard to the chasm that divides the worlds of men and women, with her sympathies resting with the female population.
I don't believe your thesis statement answers the question. The thesis is rather off-topic. To sum up. I recommend providing historical background in your first sentence. You should attempt to make the historical information augment your contention. Merely stating that the author is a fine poet is extraneous and does not add anything to your argument. Moreover, you may also want to 'step up' your vocabulary in order to acquire the higher marks. You may want to include text specific words like:chauvinism, patriarchal zeitgeist and libreto.  I think my biggest concern is the relevance to the prompt. While talking about the 'chasm that divides the worlds of men and woman' is interesting it is not pertinent to the prompt and your assessor will definitely take issue with it. Despite these shortcomings your introduction is well written and your acknowledgement of the text as a construct will heighten your marks. :)   
Disclaimer= I am not Lauren, so take everything I say with a grain of salt.