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January 29, 2020, 03:00:09 am

Author Topic: 50 in English, available for queries :)  (Read 213104 times)  Share 

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smile+energy

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #270 on: May 20, 2014, 04:18:51 pm »
0
Thanks so much, Lauren.  :)
2014: English(EAL)   Methods   Biology   Health and human development   Accounting

Rishi97

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #271 on: May 23, 2014, 10:11:54 pm »
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Hi Lauren

I have to write my contect piece on "We find out who we are from the conflict we face"... This prompt is a bit tricky and I'm finding it really hard to come up with ideas for an expository essay.
Could you please help me?
All suggestions welcome :)
2014: VCE completed
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Cort

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #272 on: May 24, 2014, 12:23:26 am »
0
Two silly questions:

1. If you received feedback - how would you handle it? I mean, what would you do to work with your feedback so that next time, you can improve on it? I know you can just 'write more constantly', but I'm trying to work with my feedback so next time I write again I'm aware of what the heck is wrong with my writing.

2. How did you expand on your quality of ideas? What tips would you suggest to expand on the quality of ideas?
I actually have no idea what I'm saying or talking about.

Jono_CP

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #273 on: May 24, 2014, 12:30:59 am »
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Hi Lauren,

I consider English to be my one and only speciality (in life generally) and I did poorly in my text response essay as I am aiming for a 40+ and only got 27/30 when I was receiving 29s in the practice ones. Moreover, I have dropped two marks for Language Analysis and the Speech 19/20 and 19/20, and I know to get 40 you have to be getting 100's and A+'s. Bitterly disappointed, as I feel that my teacher adjusted the marks slightly to keep me motivated. Unfortunately, even if I had done the impossible like yourself and got a 50 study score in English, I would have always been looking for ways I could improve in the future.

Sooo upset. I was wondering if anyone has any advice on dealing with this disappointing result? I created my own chapter summaries, highlighted my novel, read it x 2, completed + 13-15 essays and went beyond the book itself to include the history of In the Country of Men. I remain inconsolable at the moment.

brenden

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #274 on: May 24, 2014, 10:32:21 am »
+2
Dude... You could get a 50 with those marks? 40 is still WELL within reach. Keep doing your best.
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Einstein

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #275 on: May 24, 2014, 11:49:29 am »
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Hi Lauren,

I consider English to be my one and only speciality (in life generally) and I did poorly in my text response essay as I am aiming for a 40+ and only got 27/30 when I was receiving 29s in the practice ones. Moreover, I have dropped two marks for Language Analysis and the Speech 19/20 and 19/20, and I know to get 40 you have to be getting 100's and A+'s. Bitterly disappointed, as I feel that my teacher adjusted the marks slightly to keep me motivated. Unfortunately, even if I had done the impossible like yourself and got a 50 study score in English, I would have always been looking for ways I could improve in the future.

Sooo upset. I was wondering if anyone has any advice on dealing with this disappointing result? I created my own chapter summaries, highlighted my novel, read it x 2, completed + 13-15 essays and went beyond the book itself to include the history of In the Country of Men. I remain inconsolable at the moment.

i agree with cyclops, you have a stronger chance of getting a 50, then you do of getting 40-45 with those marks (if you understand what i mean - dont think of the 0.15%, hard to explain) keep going at it.

90ATAR

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #276 on: May 25, 2014, 01:51:22 pm »
0
I am aiming for a 40+ and only got 27/30, 19/20 and 19/20. Sooo upset, disappointing result. I remain inconsolable at the moment.
VCE is just a gruelling, torturous year of unrequited results. You are going nowhere with these results - it's too late, just give up.

EDIT: Sorry! I was just being cheeky!
« Last Edit: May 25, 2014, 05:35:04 pm by 90ATAR »

Jono_CP

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #277 on: May 25, 2014, 04:16:02 pm »
0
Hey guys, I quite honestly wasn't expecting the criticism that I have attracted here and other posts, but perhaps it was warranted.

It was neither my intention to make people envious or critical of my marks, even then if it helps even the ledger, I am failing Further Mathematics.

At the time I was visibly upset, as when one puts in a lot of sacrifice (e.g. I have no social media accounts, hardly go out) and doesn't get what they expect it kind of hurts... I needed a forum, even if it was only the internet to vent that frustration. I apologise.

I suffer from depression, and whilst it is more manageable this year than it was last year, I want to make amends and exceed myself in VCE. I got a 36 study score for History Rev's but this could have honestly been more, if I didn't skip so many classes (not that I wanted to, and for those who have suffered from this illness would know what I mean).

Again I am sorry if I have caused such angst amongst the forums - this was neither my intention nor what I was aiming to do.


literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #278 on: May 25, 2014, 04:50:14 pm »
+4
Hi Lauren

I have to write my contect piece on "We find out who we are from the conflict we face"... This prompt is a bit tricky and I'm finding it really hard to come up with ideas for an expository essay.
Could you please help me?
All suggestions welcome :)

If you're really struggling, go back to the text and use that as your starting point. I'm a bit hesitant to help you out here since coming up with ideas is the most important part of an expository essay, and having someone else do that for you sort of undermines the benefit of practising.
I can give you some advice on general tactics though: remember to question the prompt as much as possible. What is it implying? Is this always the case? Are there exceptions, and if so, what do they tell us?
At the most basic level, work out what your contention is. Obviously for an expository piece your contention doesn't have to be a really strong one, but it should still be clear and well-developed so that it gives your easy some focus. So work out what you think of the prompt then get back to me if you're still struggling.
Two silly questions:

1. If you received feedback - how would you handle it? I mean, what would you do to work with your feedback so that next time, you can improve on it? I know you can just 'write more constantly', but I'm trying to work with my feedback so next time I write again I'm aware of what the heck is wrong with my writing.

2. How did you expand on your quality of ideas? What tips would you suggest to expand on the quality of ideas?
1. That would depend on the feedback. For instance, a lot of the stuff I got last year was for my structure; my topic sentences often lacked focus, and my conclusions were a bit weak, so I knew what I had to do. However, in earlier years I'd also had feedback like: 'you need to work on this paragraph. I'm not "feeling" this paragraph' (to which my sarcastic response at the time was: 'shall I write it in Braille next time?')
If the feedback isn't clear then ask your teacher to explain. I've heard some teachers make comments deliberately ambiguous so that it encourages the students to come to them and discuss their work.
2. Ask questions. Dissect the prompt. Read widely. Force yourself to move beyond "safe" analysis once in awhile. If you want more specific advice, let me know which essay type you're dealing with and/or which texts you're studying :)
Hi Lauren,

I consider English to be my one and only speciality (in life generally) and I did poorly in my text response essay as I am aiming for a 40+ and only got 27/30 when I was receiving 29s in the practice ones. Moreover, I have dropped two marks for Language Analysis and the Speech 19/20 and 19/20, and I know to get 40 you have to be getting 100's and A+'s. Bitterly disappointed, as I feel that my teacher adjusted the marks slightly to keep me motivated. Unfortunately, even if I had done the impossible like yourself and got a 50 study score in English, I would have always been looking for ways I could improve in the future.

Sooo upset. I was wondering if anyone has any advice on dealing with this disappointing result? I created my own chapter summaries, highlighted my novel, read it x 2, completed + 13-15 essays and went beyond the book itself to include the history of In the Country of Men. I remain inconsolable at the moment.
VCE is just a gruelling, torturous year of unrequited results. You are going nowhere with these results - it's too late, just give up.
90ATAR's post was obviously in jest, and I know the self-deprication can be somewhat irksome when the people doing it aren't "struggling", but let's not lose perspective here.
Jono_CP: this sort of self-awareness isn't such a bad thing, so long as you channel it properly. Rather than descending into inconsolable grief, think about things in a more constructive way. cyclops is right, those marks put you in an excellent position at this stage of the year, well and truly in the 40s if you work consistently.
Also, have a read of some of the 'how vce/ATAR/study scores are calculated' threads on here; A+s and 100%s aren't essential; I bombed on two SACs and there was always room for improvement in other essays, and it all turned out alright for me :)
I say bombed. I was still in the A/A+ bracket. For some people, a 14/20 is a landmark achievement, and for others a 19/20 is a slap in the face. We all have our different standards for good reason.
On the one hand, other people need to be aware of this, but on the other, you putting yourself down can make others feel even worse. Unfortunately VCE doesn't measure performance based on personal bests, but on how you perform in relation to your class, cohort and state. Yes it sucks, but you're all in the same boat. Apologies if this all sounds flippant or cliched, but trust me, 6 months after vce is over for you, you'll wonder why grade points ever mattered at all.

My only other suggestion would be to have a think about uni/career pathways. Aiming for 40+s is excellent, but sometimes your performance is out of your control. If you're sick of something goes terribly wrong outside school, GAT and derived scores should help you out, but in subjective courses like English, sometimes an assessor just won't like the cut of your jib. The system tries to make it fairer, but you never know. Study scores are very rarely an accurate representation of a student's potential, just a combination of blind luck and learned ability. It's a ticket to a uni course and then it hardly ever matters again.
Cept bragging rights.

Don't let the numbers get you down :)

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #279 on: May 25, 2014, 07:13:40 pm »
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Sorry if this has already been answered but, how are we meant to structure a language analysis from 3 articles and an image?

90ATAR

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #280 on: May 26, 2014, 06:53:01 pm »
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Hi Laura,

I was just wondering is it always possible to get a 40+ when it comes down to the exam? Whilst I'd consider myself competent in English, what VCE wants from me and what I am providing are the worlds apart and my teacher is terrible which doesn't help my case. I have received a 12/20 for my speech, 13/20 for my Language Analysis and 24/30 for my Text Response. I'm basically asking this as to whether it is pointless or not in getting a tutor to up my ability to write essays and such to get into that 40SS bracket or continue on with my current year 10 capacity in English.

My school ranks about 50th in the state if that is any help. I scored quite 3-4 marks above the average for text response, well below average for my speech and probably around average or a little below for Language Analysis -> and my main reason for doing so poorly is because I quite honestly have no idea what is going on and have nowhere to go because my teacher is a joke. English could definitely bridge the gap between me attending Melbourne instead of Monash which I really really want to do, but I feel like I've just f'd up completely and there's no coming back.

Thanks a lot Laura.

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #281 on: May 26, 2014, 08:22:39 pm »
+7
lencake:

Check the very first post in this thread for a general guide for L.A. structure, or search 'key player' in the top right hand corner, the 3rd/4th result or so should be one of my long posts explaining my recommended approach :)


60ATAR:

Can't remember where I read it, but there's an excellent post somewhere on here that basically says, yes, if you work hard enough you can get pretty much any score you want* but going from a 12/20 to a 20/20 doesn't just happen because you want it to.
*Since English is so subjective anyway, aiming for specific scores is not recommended. Work on qualitative improvement rather than quantitative. Instead of thinking 'I got a 7 on this essay but I got an 8 on my last one; I must be getting worse' think: eg. 'my last essay was too specific, so I tried to be more general but ended up overcorrecting. Now I need to find a balance between the two.'
Getting a tutor doesn't just 'up your ability' either. If your teacher isn't helping you and you need some guidance then maybe it's a good idea, but even then it still requires you to put in a lot of effort; having a tutor doesn't correlate with a higher score.
It sounds like you're focusing a little too much on the numbers. Having goals for uni is excellent, provided they're constructive and encouraging you, not detracting from your studies. Narrowing it down to 'having no idea what's going on' isn't going to be of any use to anyone trying to help you, least of all yourself. Go back to some of the feedback you've received and try to work out why you're getting those scores instead of dwelling on the fact that you're getting them.

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #282 on: May 27, 2014, 11:30:55 am »
+10
Good question, this is a tricky one. I'd say generally an expository essay should aim for a 50:50 ratio between explaining examples and actually talking about the context in an abstract way. If you're overdoing the examples your essay won't really build up to anything or come to any conclusions, whereas if it's too prompt-focused then it'll seem like you aren't supporting your points.
I'd say the prompt should be your main focus (ie. it should be at the start and end of most of your paragraphs, just to set up/drive your points home respectively) This is a massive generalisation though, I have heaps of essays I've written that don't conform to this. The strength of most essays is in the quality of their examples, but if you can't link them to the context properly then you're unlikely to get much credit for them, so I suppose the two are equally important.

The best way to work out your strengths is just to write a practice essay. Get some feedback from your teacher (or the forums) and then work out whether your writing is too evidence/discussion dominant. It can be hard to write without feedback in mind sometimes, but you've got to start somewhere.

In this case I'd say be careful not to let your examples do all the work for you. One of the most common mistakes in context pieces is leaving ideas un-developed just because they seem self-explanatory. Also - make sure each example is telling us something new; don't use multiple cases to illustrate the same point. This is where deconstructing the prompt can be helpful

eg. 'We cannot evade the consequences of reality.'
  • Is this always true? Can we sometimes/partially evade consequences? Is this the case for everyone involved?
  • Why is this true/false? <-- this is an important one
  • Pick apart individual words like 'evade:' connotations of escaping or running away from responsibilities. Maybe evasion can be a good or necessary thing sometimes? OR perhaps it's always neglectful/cowardly? Why are we trying to evade the consequences anyway?
  • ditto with 'consequences:' in what form? Are these consequences always tangible and immediate, or are some more subtle, taking a while to come about? And is this only true for 'consequences of reality'? What about the consequences of our own actions, or those of other people?

Put simply, there's a lot more in this prompt than just 'how we can (or cannot) evade reality,' and an essay that just explores two sides with a couple of examples for each won't get you much beyond the middle band of marks. There are always more than two sides to a prompt/context. Ask as many questions as possible and see where it takes you. The best way I can put it is: your examples should facilitate discussion, but not dictate it.

Hope that helps :)

brenden

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #283 on: May 27, 2014, 01:10:46 pm »
+2
Remember to upvote her, people.
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charmanderp

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #284 on: May 27, 2014, 02:02:15 pm »
+1
Remember to upvote her, people.
her was a great film but I'm not sure the technology is so real that it's capable of making an account on AN and posting so that I can upvote it.

....

Keep up the good work Lauren!
University of Melbourne - Bachelor of Arts majoring in English, Economics and International Studies (2013 onwards)