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Author Topic: 50 in English, available for queries :)  (Read 273097 times)  Share 

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literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #225 on: April 21, 2014, 04:46:41 pm »
+4
zeiinaaa:

My study scores were:
English: [50]
Lit: [46 ->47 yay for high aggregates! I was still robbed though...]
Art: [44 raw, down to 39 or something, scaled out of my top 4]
Indo: [37 damn oral exam >:(]
Methods: [36 meh, I'm doomed to a life of Arts anyways]

With regards to a specific study routine,
No x ∞
I was incredibly fluid with my timetabling; a strategy that might work well for some but not one I would recommend. But for most of my subjects all I needed to do was write essays, which is something I can do pretty well under time anyway. I worked on methods a few nights a week because I knew that was my weakest subject, and if I hadn't put that effort in I wouldn't done nearly as well.
Most days I'd work on a subject at a time, unless I had homework or due pieces. I'd spend a night reading a hell of a lot of external info about my lit texts, or cutting and pasting ( ;D ) in my art folio.
And other nights I would collapse into bed and not do anything productive till 9:00 the next day in class. And whilst I would recommend being a little more disciplined than I was, I think this last bit is important. By all means timetable every week if that's what you need, but be prepared to ditch it if you're just not feeling up to study. Obviously there'll be instances where you just have to push through whatever mild apathy you have, but let yourself have a night off occasionally. If you truly are burned out (trust me, you'll know when this happens) then you may just need a night off. Schedules can provide much needed perspective about how much you have to do and the time you have to do it in, but don't let them dictate your year, or all you'll have to show for it is an ATAR.

zeiinaaa

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #226 on: April 21, 2014, 05:05:07 pm »
0
Wow you are so intelligent! How'd you achieve such a high mark in literature?

And I agree with what you wrote based on the whole study routine, that really does help me understand more of how I should spread out my work over the week! :)

Thanks for answering my questions, I know it must get a bit annoying, but you're helping so much people so thankyou!
Class of 2015

scandin9

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #227 on: April 21, 2014, 07:49:57 pm »
+1
Hey Lauren,
If you have time, I would really appreciate some feedback for my text response.
 
Romeo and Juliet were victims of adult foolishness”. Discuss

William Shakespeare’s lachrymose tragedy, Romeo and Juliet, a five-act drama set in the Italian city of Verona shows that feuding results in catastrophic ends. Romeo and Juliet’s elders are indeed to be blamed for the protagonists’ deaths. Romeo and Juliet’s parents are indoctrinated in their historical feud; moreover, their relationship with Romeo and Juliet is shallow and their ancient grudge isolates the two protagonists. While this is the case, Shakespeare’s foremost message rests on the omnipresence of fate and its ability to turn love’s forcefulness into death. Conversely, The Prince of Verona, Prince Escalus, is an authority figure who exacerbates the two lovers’ predicament. Hence, Shakespeare presents a dichotomous view that allocates blame both to the adult, antagonistic characters and to the inescapability of fate.

The parents of the two protagonists leave Romeo and Juliet alone and their disregard for their needs is a key factor in their deaths. Their ancient quarrel was caused by their ancestors and is reinforced by their inability to reconcile with their opposing households.  This can be seen in the play’s opening act, where a ruinous brawl takes place, when Abram, servant of the house of Montague says,” Do you bite your thumb at us sir”? Sampson, the servant of the Capulet family, declares “I do bite my thumb at you, sir”. This shows the absurdity of the maleficent quarrel between the two households; such a tokenistic gesture that has no meaning initiates an extraordinary amount of carnage. Shakespeare uses this to illustrate the lunacy of the feud and the   preposterousness of violence in general. It is this focus on violence and a prosaic view of love that inhibits the love between Romeo and Juliet. The formality of exchange between Lady Capulet and Juliet can be seen in Act One Scene Three, where Lady Capulet says, Nurse, where’s my daughter? Call her forth to me”. Juliet responds by saying “Madam, I am here. What is your will?” This exchange of a mundane daily nicety highlights the shallowness of the relationship between Juliet and her mother. Thus, Shakespeare’s deliberate ambiguity in concealing the cause of the feud between the Montagues and Capulets is done to accentuate the ridiculousness of the feud. The quarrel between the two households shows Romeo and Juliet’s ancestors bear some responsibility for their deaths.   
On the other hand, Shakespeare’s main point rests on the inevitability of fate and its ability to subvert love. Thus, Romeo and Juliet most poignantly examines fate and its omnipresent existence. Fate’s inevitability is pervasive, often directed by the influence of the stars and the influence of the supernatural. As soon as Romeo and his associates plan to gatecrash  Capulet’s party Romeo has a premonition of impending doom, and Mercutio, the Prince’s kinsman, insists his dream of doom is caused by a figment of Paganism. The eponymous Queen Mab is depicted as a supernatural character that helps bring Romeo and Juliet to a tragic end because “She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes. In shape no bigger than an agate stone”. This remark is said in the concluding lines of Act One Scene Four and indicates that the supernatural form of fate is a small force, almost unnoticeable; however, its significance is unavoidable. Although Romeo ignores Queen Mab’s invisible influence he is very much aware that she “hath been with him”.  Thus, Mercutio’s speech in the concluding lines of Act One Scene Four shows that the supernatural is a force to be reckoned with. The lover’s realisation that they are “star-crossed” is heavily featured and adds to fate’s fickleness. The Chorus says this in the prologue. This major statement indicates that the results of this play are not controllable by humanity. Romeo and Juliet shows, through celestial imagery, that fate is powerful and unstoppable by humanity’s love because of “some consequence yet hanging in the stars”. Therefore, in Romeo and Juliet Shakespeare shows   that fate as a supernatural entity is the main factor that inhibits the love of Romeo and Juliet and causes their death.

 Moreover, Shakespeare shows that humans are not in control of their dreams and who they are fated to fall in love with. Rather, their love is instigated by chance and not choice because they are “fortune’s fool”. This somewhat nihilistic statement comes from Romeo after he slays Tybalt.  This can be seen, at the Capulet Lamas Eve party, at the conclusion of act one,  when Lord Capulet says that Romeo “is a virtuous and well governed youth”; thus, showing his high standing in Verona; however, this high standing is unable to help him with his love for Juliet because he is a victim of fate’s inevitability. Shakespeare suggests that the love between Romeo and Juliet loomed only as an outgrowth of happenstance. Yet again Romeo foreshadows his death and indicates his death is a result of fate. Fate separates the lovers from the walls of Verona and leaves them with no true allies. This is evident because Shakespeare only utilizes the soliloquy form in the play for the two lovers. Hence Shakespeare illuminates the loneliness of the two lovers and their inability to choose their destiny. It is through the isolation of the lovers that impedes the love between Romeo and Juliet; thus showing how fate permeates the play. Thus, showing that fate controls the parents of the two lovers; however, the absence of a clear and individual antagonist in the play indicates that not one individual or any catalyst of fate is responsible for the deaths of the two protagonists, but indeed, a combination of factors as is consistent with the nature and pattern of traditional tragedy.

 Prince Escalus, The Prince of Verona, aims to restore peace in Verona; however, his actions only exacerbate the quarrel between the Montagues and the Capulets. This is evident, at the play’s climax, when the Prince says,” See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate.  And I for winking at your discords too”. Thus, the Prince is admitting that he didn’t understand the extent of the two families’ hatred. As a result, Shakespeare refrains from writing this damning speech in Iambic Pentameter; unlike, the rest of the play, which Shakespeare writes in poetic form. This change in writing style illuminates the speech’s resonance and its condemning tone. The connotations in the Prince’s condemnatory speech indicate that all the townspeople have been and will be punished. This indicates that Shakespeare allocates blame to a variety of characters because the Prince is very much aware of his shortcomings in the matter of Romeo and Juliet; thus, indicating that an adult, authority figure that was supposed to protect the streets of Verona failed in his duty.

Throughout the play numerous adult characters contribute to the deaths of Romeo and Juliet. Through religious imagery, Shakespeare also refers to fate as the ultimate reason for the tragedy. The Prince is derelict in his duties by allowing the death of the two protagonists. The Montagues and Capulets grand naivety in allowing their feud to continue enables their suicides to eventuate. Holistically, Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet censures these adult inimical characters and the ubiquitous presence of fate for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet.

Thanks in advance


auds

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #228 on: April 21, 2014, 08:06:11 pm »
0
Hi Lauren,

Do you have any samples of comparative language analyses that you could post up ??

Thanks !
Pls do not send me a pm about Aspire applications. The process has vastly changed since I applied.

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My Indo Advice Thread :)

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DJA

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #229 on: April 22, 2014, 10:03:08 pm »
+1
Hi Lauren!

Just out of interest which texts did you study for English and for Literature?
2014 - English (50, Premier's Award)| Music Performance (50, Premier's Award) | Literature (46~47) | Biology (47) | Chemistry (41) |  MUEP Chemistry (+4.5)  ATAR: 99.70

Griffith University Gold Coast Queensland
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DJA's Guide to Language Analysis (Section C)
DJA's guide on the topic of English Expression (Text response)

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #230 on: April 23, 2014, 09:20:00 am »
+2
auds:

I've put two of my practice essays up on the first page of this thread, and they're both comparative pieces.

DJALogical:

For English I did Year of Wonders (no longer on the reading list) and Henry IV with the latter being my exam text. For Context I did Paradise Rd (film) and Life of Galileo for Conflict.
For Lit: Atonement, Freedom of the City, Hunter, The Boat, Adrienne Rich's poetry, and Antony and Cleopatra, with the last two being my two exam texts :)

Bestie

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #231 on: April 23, 2014, 11:02:25 am »
0
Please check your PM, i'm sorry i may have accidentally sent it twice....

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #232 on: April 23, 2014, 07:16:30 pm »
+4
Romeo and Juliet were victims of adult foolishness”. Discuss

William Shakespeare’s lachrymose tragedy, Romeo and Juliet, a five-act drama set in the Italian city of Verona it's not compulsary that you cut this out, just know that it's not earning you any marks, and you risk sounding like you're 'waffling on,' which the examiners are not a fan of.. shows that feuding needs a qualifier here, is this always the case? Maybe say 'can' or 'often' to avoid seeming so absolute results in catastrophic ends. Romeo and Juliet’s elders are indeed to be blamed for the protagonists’ deaths. Romeo and Juliet’s consider synonyms: 'the couple' or 'the lovers' parents are indoctrinated word choice. Entrenched? Ingrained? You could say the younger generation (Tybalt, Mercutio) are indoctrinated by their parents, but the parents are a different case altogether in their historical feud; moreover, their relationship with Romeo and Juliet is shallow and their ancient grudge isolates the two protagonists. While this is the case, Shakespeare’s foremost message rests on the omnipresence of fate and its ability to turn love’s forcefulness into death. Conversely, The Prince of Verona, Prince Escalus, is an authority figure who exacerbates the two lovers’ predicament. Hence, Shakespeare presents a dichotomous view that allocates blame both to the adult, antagonistic characters and to the inescapability inevitability of fate.

The parents of the two protagonists leave Romeo and Juliet alone and their disregard for their needs is a key factor in their deaths. Their ancient quarrel was caused by their ancestors and is reinforced by their inability to reconcile with their opposing households.  This can be seen in the play’s opening act, where a ruinous brawl takes place, when Abram, servant of the house of Montague says,” Do you bite your thumb at us sir”? Sampson, the servant of the Capulet family, declares “I do bite my thumb at you, sir”. This shows the absurdity of the maleficent w.c. quarrel between the two households; such a tokenistic gesture that has no meaning initiates an extraordinary amount of carnage. Excellent analysis, but I wouldn't say thumb biting has no meaning. It certainly doesn't to us today, but in Elizabethan England it was a genuine sign of disrespect. Shakespeare uses this to illustrate the lunacy of the feud and the   preposterousness of violence in general. V. good! It is this focus on violence and a prosaic view of love relationships? that inhibits the love between Romeo and Juliet. The formality of the exchange between Lady Capulet and Juliet can be seen in Act One Scene Three, where Lady Capulet says, Nurse, where’s my daughter? Call her forth to me”. Juliet responds by saying “Madam, I am here. What is your will?” This exchange of a mundane daily nicety highlights the shallowness of the relationship between Juliet and her mother. *Thus, Shakespeare’s deliberate ambiguity in concealing the cause of the feud between the Montagues and Capulets is done to accentuate the ridiculousness of the feud. The quarrel between the two households shows Romeo and Juliet’s ancestors bear some responsibility for their deaths.   
* These are both god points, but I don't understand the 'thus.' The two arguments seem to be quite unrelated. Either save this Juliet-Mother point for a later paragraph, or just strengthen the link between that and the absurdity of the feud. But this is a really strong paragraph overall.

On the other hand, Shakespeare’s main point rests on the inevitability of fate and its ability to subvert love. Thus, Romeo and Juliet most poignantly examines fate and its omnipresent existence. Either Romeo and Juliet examine or 'Romeo and Juliet' examines Are you atlking about the characters or the text? Fate’s inevitability is pervasive, often directed encapsulated? conveyed through? mirrored in? by the influence of the stars and the influence of the supernatural. synonyms for influence'? As soon as Romeo and his associates plan to gatecrash  Capulet’s party Romeo has a premonition of impending doom, and Mercutio, the Prince’s kinsman, insists his dream of doom is caused by a figment of Paganism. The eponymous ? Romeo and Juliet are the eponymous ones  ??? Queen Mab is depicted as a supernatural character that helps bring Romeo and Juliet to a tragic end because “She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes. In shape no bigger than an agate stone”. This remark is said in the concluding lines of Act One Scene Four and indicates that the supernatural form of fate is a small force, almost unnoticeable; however, its significance is unavoidable. Although Romeo ignores Queen Mab’s invisible influence he is very much aware that she “hath been with him”.  Thus, Mercutio’s speech in the concluding lines of Act One Scene Four shows that the supernatural is a force to be reckoned with. The lover’s realisation that they are “star-crossed” , as the chorus exalts in the prologue, is heavily featured and adds to fate’s fickleness. The Chorus says this in the prologue. This major statement indicates that the results of this play are not controllable by humanity. Romeo and Juliet play or characters?? shows, through celestial imagery, that fate is powerful and unstoppable by humanity’s love because of “some consequence yet hanging in the stars”. Therefore, in Romeo and Juliet Shakespeare shows   that fate as a supernatural entity is the main factor that inhibits the love of Romeo and Juliet and causes their death.
Remember to make it clear when you're refering to characters and when you're talking about the text as a whole. This is a common problem in Shakespeare since so many of his plays centre on the eponymous/ titular (meaning 'of the title') characters. Quotation marks in writing or italics/underlining for typed pieces is the convention here.


 Moreover, Shakespeare shows that humans are not in control of their dreams and who they are fated to fall in love with. Rather, their love is instigated by chance and not choice because they are “fortune’s fool”. Excellent link. This somewhat nihilistic statement comes from Romeo after he slays Tybalt.  This can be seen, at the Capulet Lamas Eve party, at the conclusion of act one,  when Lord Capulet says that Romeo “is a virtuous and well governed youth”; thus, showing his high standing in Verona; however, this high standing is unable to help him with his love for Juliet because he is a victim of fate’s inevitability. Shakespeare suggests that the love between Romeo and Juliet loomed w.c. only as an outgrowth of happenstance. Yet again Romeo foreshadows his death and indicates his death is a result of fate. How? When? You need evidence here. Fate separates the lovers from the walls of Verona and leaves them with no true allies. This is evident because Shakespeare only utilizes the soliloquy form in the play for the two lovers. Hence Shakespeare illuminates the loneliness of the two lovers and their inability to choose their destiny. It is through the isolation of the lovers that impedes the love between Romeo and Juliet; thus showing how fate permeates the play. Thus, showing This also serves to show that fate controls the parents of the two lovers; however, the absence of a clear and individual antagonist in the play indicates that not one individual or any catalyst of fate is responsible for the deaths of the two protagonists, but indeed instead, it is a combination of factors as is consistent with the nature and pattern of traditional tragedy. V. good para.

link? ^This seems to be more of a final paragraph, the one below feels 'tacked on' at the end.
 Prince Escalus, The Prince of Verona, aims to restore peace in Verona; however, his actions only exacerbate the quarrel between the Montagues and the Capulets. This is evident, at the play’s climax, when the Prince says,” See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate.  And I for winking at your discords too”. Thus, the Prince is admitting that he didn’t understand the extent of the two families’ hatred. As a result, Shakespeare refrains from writing this damning speech in Iambic Pentameter; unlike, the rest of the play, which Shakespeare writes in poetic form. This change in writing style illuminates the speech’s resonance and its condemning tone. The connotations in the Prince’s condemnatory diatribe? accusatory? polemic? there are some great synonyms for this speech indicate that all the townspeople have been and will be punished. This indicates that Shakespeare allocates blame to a variety of characters because the Prince is very much aware of his shortcomings in the matter of Romeo and Juliet; thus, indicating that an adult, authority figure that was supposed to protect the streets of Verona failed in his duty.

Throughout the play numerous adult characters contribute to the deaths of Romeo and Juliet. Through religious w.c. It's supernatural/ ethereal, but I wouldn't say religious imagery, Shakespeare also refers to fate as the ultimate reason for the tragedy. The Prince is derelict in his duties by allowing the death of the two protagonists. The Montagues and Capulets grand naivety in allowing their feud to continue enables their suicides to eventuate. Try not to have your conclusion be this definitive listing of the points in each paragraph. It's okay to summarise, but try to mix it up a little. Holistically, Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet censures this is more for formal documents or legal disputes, go for denounces? fulminates against? excoriates? Or maybe they're too strong? Even just inpugns or challenges would be alright here these adult inimical characters and the ubiquitous presence of fate for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet.

walkec

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #233 on: April 24, 2014, 05:42:09 pm »
0
Hi Lauren, just wanting to get your advice on something about context.
My context is Whose Reality and we have a practice SAC after school on Thursday next week. I was just wondering how to best prepare for this between now and then?

I feel somewhat comfortable with the ideas in the text, but how do you choose what to do with them in a piece of writing?

Thanks  :)

Bestie

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #234 on: April 24, 2014, 10:43:10 pm »
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Hi Lauren,
did the email work? i'm not sure if it sent through i have a feeling i sent it to the wrong person...

but... can you help me i'm still doing the waleed aly article :(

Aly’s article is commentary on the reaction of the general public to deaths in custody as opposed to deaths at sea in boat accidents. He questions the imbalance of outrage over one death compared to another that is ‘somehow less dead’, questioning readers and regards this as an almost sadistic catharsis. In his choice of ‘somehow’, further magnifies...

its like to him its not less dead but to us it's 'somehow' less dead.. the somehow.. like he doesn't agree with it and readers are presented as.. i don't how it impacts readers...

and lastly,

the quote: ‘its ultimately irrelevance’ ‘doesn’t change anything’ ‘what difference will it make?’ - for sure its not discouraging them

‘they will mean nothing’ because ‘our public conservation isn’t interested in knowing’. In ending with this note, lingers in the mind of the audience to...

Thank you in advance :)
« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 11:00:48 pm by Bestie »

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #235 on: April 25, 2014, 08:35:38 am »
+6
Hi Lauren, just wanting to get your advice on something about context.
My context is Whose Reality and we have a practice SAC after school on Thursday next week. I was just wondering how to best prepare for this between now and then?

I feel somewhat comfortable with the ideas in the text, but how do you choose what to do with them in a piece of writing?

Thanks  :)

How you study will depend on how you write. I'll tailor my advice to expository(ish) style since that's the most common, but if you want to attempt something creative, let me know what your plans are and we can work with that.
Unlike in T.R. where your examples drive your argument, in Context your discussion should be the primary concern with examples there to demonstrate your point. While you may still have a contention in a Context piece, it's not mandatory; you can simply 'expose' elements of the prompt in an interesting way without really coming to a definitive conclusion.
Even if you know the text well enough, I'd recommend drawing up a list/ table/ mindmap of ideas, just to keep track of what each example is saying about Whose Reality. I don't know which text you've got, but it might be worth breaking down the Context into possible prompt types and the fitting your examples underneath those umbrellas (eg. the nature of our reality, changes in reality, subjectivity/objectivity, creating reality, responses to reality etc.) This is by no means conclusive, you could have anything from 4 to 20 prompt types, and of course there's a chance your school will pick something left-of-field that you're not prepared for, but you should still be able to mould two or three of these categories together and work around that.
Once you've got the text covered, move onto any external examples you've collected or researched so far. This is one of the trickier contexts to do this for, but try to find some relevant examples in the media, or throughout history, in other literature, or even your own experiences (though it can be difficult to extrapolate from this: 'This happened to me on the bus the other day. From that we can conclude that reality is subjective' jars a little. Anecdotal/1st person voice is almost always best done through the eyes of another eg. adopting the voice of someone in the text, or someone involved in your external example.)
There's a lot of leeway in context in terms of how to write, so find whatever works best for you. What I usually recommend is starting with a slightly creative intro, or at least something to grab the readers' attention.

Between now and then, I'd do at least 2 practice essays but that number's pretty arbitrary. I say two because at least it'll give you some variation with the prompt, and a chance to explore two different sets of ideas. At least one of these should be under your SAC conditions too.

Apart from that, just go over whatever feedback you've gotten from your teacher, that should give you more guidance if needed

Good Luck :)

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #236 on: April 25, 2014, 08:44:59 am »
+5
Bestie,

Okay, last ones:

'somehow' is said with incredulity, mocking the idea of there being different degrees of dead, thus highlighting to readers the twisted logic behind such reasoning.

And those final lines are kind of facetious, since Aly's article is itself a part of public/media discourse. He dichotomises the public as either disinterested and misinformed, or extremely aware and conscious of the 'real' issue. Therefore, readers are more likely to side with the latter group and join Aly in his condemnation of the others.

I can understand the vexation around this article, but you need to start practising this pattern of 'technique/example, effect on readers, how is this persuasive' yourself. Rather than getting bogged down in sentence starters like "In ending with this note, lingers in the mind of the audience to...
" Just break it down in your head into simple english. There's a reason you picked these quotes to analyse, so what was it? Go with your gut reaction, how might you be persuade by this? If needed, link it back to the contention and try to look at things from the author's point of view: why might he have chosen this word in particular to try and persuade readers?

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #237 on: April 29, 2014, 10:45:33 pm »
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Hi Lauren,
this seems like a random question but the loaded terms 'cruel' and 'failure' how are we positioned to feel?
The article is like ridiculing the government policies as a 'cruel' and 'illegal failure' and unable to protect its people.
I wanted to talk about how linking government actions with illegal is sorta juxtaposing and shocks readers (which readers though)
as for 'cruel' presents the government as ______ and then when combined with failure questions the government .. not sure what to put down in the _________

Thank you in advance
« Last Edit: April 29, 2014, 10:56:48 pm by tiff_tiff »

yang_dong

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #238 on: April 29, 2014, 11:08:05 pm »
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Hi Lauren,
At school we are doing a practise on how to choose stronger more vivid words as opposed to others to convey your message (eg a war compared to fight, war obvious holds stronger and more detailed descriptions about the brutally of the argument that one I was able to do fine) but I’m a little stuck on the ‘inflamed’ compared to ‘give cause to’.
Please help. Thank you

Chang Feng

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #239 on: April 30, 2014, 09:50:46 pm »
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Hello. Just wondering if you could help. I'm still very confused with what are the aims/ requirements  of writing a context piece. How are you marked on it, and like sorta how do you write one (what's different about context)??? Thanks if you could answer the questions.