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January 26, 2020, 10:48:46 am

Author Topic: 50 in English, available for queries :)  (Read 212896 times)  Share 

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hyunah

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #180 on: April 16, 2014, 10:13:54 pm »
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oh... i thought i did that with the concern for the unhappy people and elicit sympathy is how they are inclined to feel???
no???
not right???

Bestie

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #181 on: April 16, 2014, 10:21:20 pm »
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Thank you thank you so so much :)

Dahello

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #182 on: April 16, 2014, 10:27:03 pm »
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Hi
Urgent help plz...

Is it a language technique for the writer to seem like he is talking directly to a certain group of people it's targeting... Eg it is written and read by general public but then end by seemingly targeting a group of people who promise to act better but have not done so: 'if he is true to his words, we would like to see what that entails'

Is that a technique and if so what is the purpose? Is there an effect?

Thx ;)

Yacoubb

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #183 on: April 16, 2014, 10:55:42 pm »
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Hi
Urgent help plz...

Is it a language technique for the writer to seem like he is talking directly to a certain group of people it's targeting... Eg it is written and read by general public but then end by seemingly targeting a group of people who promise to act better but have not done so: 'if he is true to his words, we would like to see what that entails'

Is that a technique and if so what is the purpose? Is there an effect?

Thx ;)

Well you could possibly say that it's an appeal to guilt? So that the writer is addressing a certain group (e.g. parents amidst the general public) and appealing to their guilt, which then compels them to act better, etc.

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #184 on: April 17, 2014, 07:48:23 am »
+1
Hi
Urgent help plz...

Is it a language technique for the writer to seem like he is talking directly to a certain group of people it's targeting... Eg it is written and read by general public but then end by seemingly targeting a group of people who promise to act better but have not done so: 'if he is true to his words, we would like to see what that entails'

Is that a technique and if so what is the purpose? Is there an effect?

Thx ;)

He's not exactly talking directly to them, this is just a combination of inclusive language and speaking on behalf of a populace. By asserting the collective 'we' are being let down by his falsity/empty promises (I'm not too sure about the context here) his audience are inclined to side with him in this subtle attack. In some sense he dichotomises (ie. makes a division between) himself and the person he's attacking, and positions the audience on his side, thus adding strength and the weight of popular support to his argument.
^This is just a general explanation, you should reword all this to suit the situation, of course :)

Apologies if I've misunderstood this, could you give me the general background info (who is speaking to whom about what?) if you need more help.

smile+energy

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #185 on: April 17, 2014, 10:09:50 am »
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smile+energy,

Loaded language refers to words that evoke emotions or make you feel something.
The connotations of a word are what you think about when you hear that word.
To use the above example, 'war' is a very loaded term. It has connotations of suffering, bloodshed, death and despair.
Basically, loaded language is language that has strong connotations.

Easiest way to differentiate 'denigrate' from 'attack': If I attacked you, I'd walk up to you and call you ugly. If I denigrated you, I'd go up to someone else and say 'my god, look at that guy, isn't he ugly!?'
Although technically that second example is an attack too, it's not a direct attack because I'm not saying it to your face, I'm saying it through someone else. Both are quite common in Language Analysis.
:)

Haha.... :D
Thanks Lauren.
That really makes sense.
2014: English(EAL)   Methods   Biology   Health and human development   Accounting

TheTreeOctopus

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #186 on: April 17, 2014, 08:41:56 pm »
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Hey Lauren!

Firstly, thanks so much for this amazing resource. :D
Secondly, I noticed you mentioned that reading Academic Journals could improve our vocabulary and expression.
I assume you aren't referring to scientific journals such as Nature or Science, but rather humanities orientated journals?
Could you please either links to where I can find such journals or the names of these journals.

Thanks.
2013 Biology|Religion and Society
2014 Math Methods CAS|Specialist Maths|Japanese|Chemistry|English|

Patches

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #187 on: April 18, 2014, 01:17:16 pm »
+2
Hey Lauren!

Firstly, thanks so much for this amazing resource. :D
Secondly, I noticed you mentioned that reading Academic Journals could improve our vocabulary and expression.
I assume you aren't referring to scientific journals such as Nature or Science, but rather humanities orientated journals?
Could you please either links to where I can find such journals or the names of these journals.

Thanks.
Not the OP, but try and find critical essays on your specific texts. This is obviously going to be dependent on what your particular texts are, but if you're doing something like Henry IV or A Christmas Carol which has been discussed for a long period of time, have a look on google scholar. Otherwise look for books on your particular book - again for Shakespeare, Dickens etc there will be plenty (try the state library - it's worth it because you'll find ideas nobody else in your class will have even thought about). Look on The Age's education page - there are 'text talk' articles on a lot of the VCE english texts which are useful.

Jstor is another great tool for finding articles similar to google scholar.


A lot of this is really dependent on the books you're studying - unfortunately some will have a lot of critical material and others very little. Send me a PM if you're having trouble finding anything.

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #188 on: April 18, 2014, 03:34:22 pm »
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^Pretty much says it all :)

When I first started looking for articles I had no idea what databases to search. A bit of simple google browsing returned some, just typing in your text title +article or +journal is usually a good start. If it's something that's been on the reading lists for awhile (3 or 4 years) then you'll probably find a lot more, though much of it will be basic study guide level stuff you'll probably cover in class anyway. But if it's a relatively new text then you might struggle, in which case look for general thematic points instead. There are quite a few feminist texts (esp. films) on the list this year, so familiarise yourself with the different waves of feminism or find accounts written during/about the time of the text. For the Australian works you'll usually be able to get a lot of information about the author, and if they're still alive you might even find a website they run. See if you can find some of their other works if they're relevant/interesting. A few of the Section A texts form part of series or at least have books that give context to the story. Google scholar is an excellent resource, but if you don't find anything there then widen your gaze to what the text contains. For any story set in a specific point in history, there are usually significant differences between the fiction and the reality. Background research can be just as valuable. One of my T.R. texts was about the plague in the late 1600s, so I ended up reading Defoe's 'Journal of the Plague year' plus a few articles about that book.

There are so many journals, you're better off searching by text and then finding what works for you :)

Bestie

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #189 on: April 18, 2014, 09:26:00 pm »
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Hi lauren,
can you please help me?
so for hw I have to analyse this quote, its just a sentence: 'sorry, but we don't get to be outrages at this. The fact that a person is dead, that another has been shot or that yet another has a fractured skull doesn't change anything'. the only background knowledge that I'm given is that the writer is trying to contend that detention centres are intentionally made as a place of 'horror', worse than what they fled their country for. the article is here: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/the-whole-point-of-detention-for-asylum-seekers-is-horror-whether-it-is-acknowledged-or-not-20140220-333yw.html but we just have to analyse how it starts and ends for now. cause apparently the choices made when a writer starts or finishes an article is very important.

So what I've done so far is:
- we inclusive language to get audience feeling involved with the issue. However, the fact that 'we don't get to be outraged at this', gets readers thinking why their freedom is restricting, catching the attention of the reader
- 'doesn't change anything' - even if there 'is a person is dead, that another has been shot or that yet another has a fractured skull', to us doesn't make the situation any worse, portraying society as inhumane and gets readers feeling guilty. Is that right?

What do you think?

and lastly for the ending quote: 'The truth is we've never really come to terms with why it is people get on boats, and why it is that, faced with hopeless inaction once they're detained, they protest. In fact, our public conversation isn't even terribly interested in knowing. That's why, when we do finally discover the facts of Manus, they will mean nothing.
cause we won't act to change anything or improve anyways? does this has the intended effect of shaming readers who oppose him and encourages readers to change their ways?

Thank you Thank you so so much

Dahello

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #190 on: April 18, 2014, 09:34:41 pm »
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Thanks Lauren and yacoubb,

Help very appreciated  :D

Can i ask something else?

cute

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #191 on: April 18, 2014, 09:52:39 pm »
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How do you suggest someone improve from a 16/20 text response to a 20/20 by the end of year 12?? Thanks :)

Dahello

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #192 on: April 18, 2014, 09:58:18 pm »
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OMG Bestie are you doing the walked aly article too?

Bestie

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #193 on: April 18, 2014, 10:00:07 pm »
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pardon?

Dahello

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #194 on: April 18, 2014, 10:01:08 pm »
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Waleed sorry... Autotype