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December 05, 2021, 02:00:20 pm

Author Topic: 50 in English, available for queries :)  (Read 273101 times)  Share 

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RazzMeTazz

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #90 on: March 11, 2014, 07:23:27 pm »
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Do you have any recommendations for any novels/types of novels, that will improve my overall English ability?

Thanks!

Phanboy

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #91 on: March 11, 2014, 10:36:04 pm »
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Thanks so much for the help!! Didn't realise the styles were mutually exclusive :)

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #92 on: March 11, 2014, 10:37:42 pm »
+5
Quick question regarding language analysis. If expert opinion is used in the article, how can we write the effect on audience? I want to say that they "are placed in a position where they must agree with the author as he is an expert". But this doesn't sound very good. Do you know any way how I can word this?

It's best to do this in the context of the piece, rather than using a 'one size fits all' formula. Simply stating 'readers are inclined to agree with an expert' or something similar is fairly pedestrian. Instead, look at how/why this particular expert is effective eg. 'Blogs' role as the Head of the Department of __ lends weight to his arguments, angling readers to side with a more informed view.'
This should be something you expand upon in close relation to the issue though, not as some separate rhetorical device; the assessor knows what these techniques do, most of the marks will come from your discussion of how these techniques persuade.

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #93 on: March 11, 2014, 10:47:04 pm »
+4
Do you have any recommendations for any novels/types of novels, that will improve my overall English ability?

Thanks!

First and foremost, it has to be something you enjoy. Don't fight your way through Ulysses or Infinite Jest just because you think it'll help, find a favourite genre or two (sci-fi, thriller, paranormal, crime.) Or you might want to look through the english text list for this year, there are SOME good ones on there -.-
Personally I favour detective stories and dystopian novels. I can recommend Vonnegut, Bradbury, Bellow and Conrad. I'm also big on foreign authors (translated, since I'm pathetically uncultured) especially Russian and Italian.
It's really up to you. If you're not a regular reader, then start with some YA fiction or something with themes that engage you. After that maybe move into some classic novels or plays. Try to always read at a level above you though. Rather than give yourself an easy time with the basics, see if you can push yourself to learn some new words or sentence structures.
Reading in general will improve your English ability, so I highly recommend finding out what works for you  :D

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #94 on: March 11, 2014, 10:54:40 pm »
+5
Thanks so much for the help!! Didn't realise the styles were mutually exclusive :)
...the forms and the styles are not mutually exclusive.
Ahem, just to clarify. They're not mutually exclusive, that's why you have the option of writing 'hybrid' essays that incorporate two or more different styles. So in your case, you might want to use a letter format, but have the writer of the letter ponder the nature of the context in an expository way, or you could even interpolate the letter with someone reading it, then provide their inner monologue, which could involve a mix of the expository and creative styles.

Jason12

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #95 on: March 12, 2014, 12:49:14 am »
0
when watching a film or reading a book for text response, do you know any tips on how to pick out things to use in an essay? For the film I have been studying, it has been difficult for me to pick out things that hasn't been done before.
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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #96 on: March 12, 2014, 08:40:52 pm »
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Hey! We had our first English language analysis SAC today..

I was just wondering how you would interpret this cartoon.

It was on mass murderer Julian Knight and whether the government should keep him indefinitely imprisoned.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/t31/1617629_259588140877095_276129351_o.jpg

This cartoon was sooooo tricky. How would you personally interpret this cartoon?

I thought the man pushing the carriage was Julian Knight and the coffin was a symbol of his future (ie. dead) and the cartoonist was showing that Knight poses no real harm to the community.

However, when I got home and re-looked at it, I realised Knight is probably the guy in the coffin. And the cartoon is actually mocking the fact that when Knight finally gets out, he is dead (indefintely imprisoned). And that is a mockery of the government's proposal to keep him in jail forever.

Do you think there is a specific way to interpret this cartoon? Are you ever penalised for identifying contentions of cartoon incorrectly?

Haha I know there is nothing you can change after a SAC but just curious...
« Last Edit: March 12, 2014, 08:44:25 pm by Yhprum »

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #97 on: March 12, 2014, 09:25:20 pm »
+9
when watching a film or reading a book for text response, do you know any tips on how to pick out things to use in an essay? For the film I have been studying, it has been difficult for me to pick out things that hasn't been done before.
Where do I start...
If you want specific help then let me know what text response/context you're studying, what film it is, and what exactly you're having trouble with. The following are some general purpose tips for how to 'read/watch' your texts.
  • (Though not applicable now) For future students: the first reading/viewing should take place during the summer holidays. The second will either be before you study it, or while you're going through it in class depending on how your school runs things. The third and subsequent times  will be before major assessment (ie. SACs and exams.) There is no set amount of times to view the text, it will depend on its complexity and your ability, but three is my recommended minimum.
  • Each of these readings will have a general purpose. The first is to acquaint yourself with the plot, characters, and perhaps some surface level themes. The second is for in depth themes, quotes, and character development. The third will be primarily for quotes and evidence, though perhaps some more extended investigation into subtler passages/scenes/metaphors rather than relying on the big moments in the text. So don't be too concerned if the sophisticated musings on iconography and semiotics don't come to you straight away :P Focus on a more gradual learning curve instead of bombarding your brain with info you can't yet handle.
  • Once you've grasped the basic ideas, try to view the text as an English Text. Basically look beyond the plot outline and the basic concerns. What is the author trying to say?? It's at this point you might want to start looking at practice prompts, the way they're phrased, and what kind of areas they want you to discuss. Probably still too soon to attempt full practice essays, worry about the content for now.
  • Step 4: RESEARCH! This can be really fun or really tedious. Depends mainly on your text, but also your attitude towards English I guess. Start with whatever you've been given in class as background material; consider this the foundation, as you'll be expected to go beyond this if you want points for interpretation and quality of ideas. Assuming you have nothing to work with: first, research the text. Wikipedia is usually sufficient :-X Familiarise yourself with the context (when and where.) Then look into the author's life and times. Are there any major events or ideologies that influence their work? This becomes the 'how and why' part, in terms of the way the text is constructed. VCAA are big on this 'construct' idea, and every essay should endeavour to step out of the textual analysis and comment on the author's views and values.
  • After that (though this one is technically still research) google '_text name_' + academic articles/ review journals/ academic essays etc. This was a big help for me when it came to alternate interpretations and developing my ideas beyond what the study designs dictated. This won't work for everyone, I know a lot of the newer texts on the reading lists won't have many resources available so my condolences to you guys. Also a lot of what you do find will be pseudo academic drivel, so take it all with a grain of salt, but eventually you'll find something owrth your time. Maybe make some notes if it's a good enough resource.
  • Now go back to the practice prompts. Note any common themes or reoccuring key words; these will likely be a major part of any essay. See if you can find some left-of-field ones too (usually structural questions) and think about how you could approach them. This is where the practice paragraphs and eventually essays will begin, though the research part can be ongoing. Read over some past essays and think about what makes them good or bad. If they've used a certain bit of evidence to make a point, think about how that same or a similar point could be made with different quotes or scenes. I've put up some notes on responding to prompts earlier that discuss how to wring the most out of a question, so maybe consult those when the time comes.
  • Then the fine tuning begins. By now you'll have some of your own work to refer back to, hopefully with as much feedback as possible (classroom teachers, or a different teacher if you want a second opinion, tutors, smart English-y friends etc.) If you still think originality and content are a problem, go back to the research and try to find an alternate interpretive angle now that you have practiced some of the more straightforward ones. Don't worry too much about this though. Granted your essay will be read amidst 200 other essays on the same text, but so long as your ideas are well supported and explored they're not going to penalise you for mentioning something they've read before; there's only so much to say. Try to have one or two key points that deal with the text in a unique way, or at least substantiate your discussion with unique evidence.
Best of luck!

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #98 on: March 12, 2014, 09:53:17 pm »
+6
I was just wondering how you would interpret this cartoon.
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/t31/1617629_259588140877095_276129351_o.jpg
Oh how I love visual analysis! It's been so long...
Okay, your safe, basic contention is, as you rightly suggested, a mockery of indefinite imprisonment. But there is soooo much more!
Knight would be the body in the coffin for sure, but he's not technically "out" is he? The coffin is barely visible, the majority of it still inside the prison. And even then he's got to get out of the prison gates which are themselves symbolic of an impenetrable boundary. Translation: even in death, Knight will be locked up as long as the government can keep him there. Furthermore you could make something out of the nature of the funeral procession. Nowadays the dead are transported in hearses, so the horse and carriage could be interpreted as 'anachronisms.' Not that horse drawn carriages were used in the late 80s when Knight was imprisoned, but stick with me on this: the horse and his rider don't belong, they are the product of another era, so the idea of them being used to pull Knight out of his prison implies he too is in a place/time he doesn't belong. I'm sure the cartoonist isn't contending the man should be released into the world, but it is a pretty scathing comment on the government's bureaucracy.
ALTERNATIVELY: you could argue this is a lighthearted piece. Well, as lighthearted as you can get when drawing pictures about serial killers. The cartoonist wants us to laugh along at the idea of a lengthy prison sentence, it's a victimless crime to us. I'd wager most people would consider an indefinite (read: permanent) jail sentence a pretty just outcome for a convicted mass murderer. In this case, we can feel protected by a government that, although incompetent, has inadvertently protected us from this man by keeping him in prison under piles of paperwork tied down by red tape. Julian Knight 'gets out' as they suggest, but is no longer a threat of any kind.

In short: there is no specific way to make sense of a cartoon. I'm an art student, so the pictorial cues came naturally to me, to the point where I'd spend too much time analysing cartoons and not enough on the written text :P They can be incredibly ambiguous, and you kind of need more art terminology that persuasive techniques if you want to do close analysis (eg. the black void of the prison interior is indicative of a bleak, inescapable vortex of suffering :P) But there is no right answer! As always with english, if you can argue your case rationally and reasonably, then there's little to stop you getting full marks. I could write about either of the two above interpretations, of a completely different one. The assessors are aware how subjective the content is; so long as you're not writing about how the cartoonist is condoning releasing all criminals from jail and replacing the entire government with Clydesdale ponies, you should be fine.
Not sure what you'd make of the... excrement coming from the back of that horse though... that's definitely symbolic of something...

BLACKCATT

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #99 on: March 12, 2014, 09:57:57 pm »
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Hi Lauren. How exactly do we challenge the prompt(text reponses)? I'm having trouble with the structure, where i would partially agree with the prompt for the first para, partially disagree for the second, and i'm lost with what to write about for the 3rd paragraph. If you could provide any helpful advice, i'd greatly appreciate it.

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #100 on: March 12, 2014, 10:17:18 pm »
+6
I'm tentative to give really specific formula advice, partially because VCAA hates formulaic essays, but mainly because every school/teacher has their different 'right way to write.' I usually advice three paragraphs in support of your contention, and then a 'challenge' in which you consider the other side of the argument. The structure will  depend on the prompt, and your strengths. This might be of use too: http://www.vcestudyguides.com/tips-for-responding-to-text-response-prompts
Don't get too caught up in paragraph grouping or 'challenging' if it's giving you trouble. It's better that you get confident in writing a cogent essay that deals directly with the prompt than worry yourself with agreeing/disagreeing.
Think of the contentions as being on a spectrum: you don't want to be too far on either side, as it'll appear like you're not taking the other arguments into account. But you don't want to be 'fence sitting' either. Your essay must come to some sort of conclusion about the text and your own interpretation, so being in the middle of the spectrum is no good either. Aim to be somewhere on either side, though of course you shouldn't be penalised for having a conflicting interpretation to the norm.
Shouldn't.
In reality, English is inherently subjective which is why I usually advice getting a feel for what sort of style/form/approach your teacher endorses. The good ones will welcome all approaches, but for the most part you'll have to cater to some structural and ideological preferences :/
Feel free to post some practice paras or essays if you want specific advice, or let me know what text/prompts you're doing and I might be able to take you through some possible structures :)

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #101 on: March 13, 2014, 12:14:32 am »
0
Where do I start...
If you want specific help then let me know what text response/context you're studying, what film it is, and what exactly you're having trouble with. The following are some general purpose tips for how to 'read/watch' your texts.
  • (Though not applicable now) For future students: the first reading/viewing should take place during the summer holidays. The second will either be before you study it, or while you're going through it in class depending on how your school runs things. The third and subsequent times  will be before major assessment (ie. SACs and exams.) There is no set amount of times to view the text, it will depend on its complexity and your ability, but three is my recommended minimum.
  • Each of these readings will have a general purpose. The first is to acquaint yourself with the plot, characters, and perhaps some surface level themes. The second is for in depth themes, quotes, and character development. The third will be primarily for quotes and evidence, though perhaps some more extended investigation into subtler passages/scenes/metaphors rather than relying on the big moments in the text. So don't be too concerned if the sophisticated musings on iconography and semiotics don't come to you straight away :P Focus on a more gradual learning curve instead of bombarding your brain with info you can't yet handle.
  • Once you've grasped the basic ideas, try to view the text as an English Text. Basically look beyond the plot outline and the basic concerns. What is the author trying to say?? It's at this point you might want to start looking at practice prompts, the way they're phrased, and what kind of areas they want you to discuss. Probably still too soon to attempt full practice essays, worry about the content for now.
  • Step 4: RESEARCH! This can be really fun or really tedious. Depends mainly on your text, but also your attitude towards English I guess. Start with whatever you've been given in class as background material; consider this the foundation, as you'll be expected to go beyond this if you want points for interpretation and quality of ideas. Assuming you have nothing to work with: first, research the text. Wikipedia is usually sufficient :-X Familiarise yourself with the context (when and where.) Then look into the author's life and times. Are there any major events or ideologies that influence their work? This becomes the 'how and why' part, in terms of the way the text is constructed. VCAA are big on this 'construct' idea, and every essay should endeavour to step out of the textual analysis and comment on the author's views and values.
  • After that (though this one is technically still research) google '_text name_' + academic articles/ review journals/ academic essays etc. This was a big help for me when it came to alternate interpretations and developing my ideas beyond what the study designs dictated. This won't work for everyone, I know a lot of the newer texts on the reading lists won't have many resources available so my condolences to you guys. Also a lot of what you do find will be pseudo academic drivel, so take it all with a grain of salt, but eventually you'll find something owrth your time. Maybe make some notes if it's a good enough resource.
  • Now go back to the practice prompts. Note any common themes or reoccuring key words; these will likely be a major part of any essay. See if you can find some left-of-field ones too (usually structural questions) and think about how you could approach them. This is where the practice paragraphs and eventually essays will begin, though the research part can be ongoing. Read over some past essays and think about what makes them good or bad. If they've used a certain bit of evidence to make a point, think about how that same or a similar point could be made with different quotes or scenes. I've put up some notes on responding to prompts earlier that discuss how to wring the most out of a question, so maybe consult those when the time comes.
  • Then the fine tuning begins. By now you'll have some of your own work to refer back to, hopefully with as much feedback as possible (classroom teachers, or a different teacher if you want a second opinion, tutors, smart English-y friends etc.) If you still think originality and content are a problem, go back to the research and try to find an alternate interpretive angle now that you have practiced some of the more straightforward ones. Don't worry too much about this though. Granted your essay will be read amidst 200 other essays on the same text, but so long as your ideas are well supported and explored they're not going to penalise you for mentioning something they've read before; there's only so much to say. Try to have one or two key points that deal with the text in a unique way, or at least substantiate your discussion with unique evidence.
Best of luck!

I'm studying a film called 'All about Eve' (I think it's a new VCAA text) for text response. I've watched the film twice (1 in class for a general viewing then a 2nd one on my own while taking notes). A few days ago i wrote an in-class practice SAC in preparation for the real sac in about a week but I felt the piece lacked any deep analysis and my intro was a bit dodgy. One thing I do struggle with is film techniques (mis en scene, camera angles) but this will be hard to help with as I assume you haven't watched the film.

I guess what i struggle with exactly is
- writing a decent intro (nice opening sentence and clear contention)
- analysing themes/characters/events to a deeper level. E.g. If a character in the film does something I am usually only able to write 1-2 sentences on that before I feel I can't analyse it any more.

Anyways the prompt was

"what I want I go after, I don't want it to come after me." How do the women in 'All about Eve' adhere to or defy the 1950's feminine values? You can do some research on this topic if you want to/have any free time. thanks
2014 ATAR - 88

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2015 sem 2 - Present: Bachelor of Commerce (Accounting/Finance), Diploma of Languages (Chinese) - Monash

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #102 on: March 18, 2014, 07:15:18 pm »
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How is employing a reasonable/logical tone persuasive?
November 6th 2014 5.15pm
Class of 2014! :D

literally lauren

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #103 on: March 18, 2014, 08:37:52 pm »
+3
How is employing a reasonable/logical tone persuasive?

Generally it makes the author seem more rational, thus their argument is more sensible and appealing. This technique is often used in conjunction with an attack on the other party, so the author creates a 'dichotomy' between his reasonable position and the crackpot/dangerous/illegitimate/no-good-very-bad other position.
It's not enough to state this in an essay though, you'd have to explain why this particular technique is effective given the issue/context/audience etc. rather than just providing a definition of what the technique does.

smile+energy

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Re: 50 in English, available for queries :)
« Reply #104 on: March 19, 2014, 03:40:08 pm »
0

  • .The first is to acquaint yourself with the plot, characters, and perhaps some surface level themes. The second is for in depth themes, quotes, and character development. 
Hi, Lauren. I don't really understand the meaning of "surface level themes" and "In depth themes". Can you explain further for me?
And if my text is a play, can I follow the ways you mentioned too?
Thanks very much :)
[/list]
« Last Edit: March 19, 2014, 03:44:10 pm by +Energy »
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