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July 16, 2019, 10:44:55 am

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 1259266 times)  Share 

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Stressedyear11here

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2580 on: August 11, 2014, 08:48:44 pm »
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How do gene probes allow you to find a particular gene?
I know that they are "labelled", that is with a fluorescent dye or a radioactive label, but when it is inserted, does the target gene become visible because of the label (gene probe)?


Thank you :)

katiesaliba

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2581 on: August 12, 2014, 12:23:55 pm »
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How do gene probes allow you to find a particular gene?
I know that they are "labelled", that is with a fluorescent dye or a radioactive label, but when it is inserted, does the target gene become visible because of the label (gene probe)?


Thank you :)

Yes because DNA is a clear substance. However, the probe will only fluoresce under UV light.
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soNasty

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2582 on: August 12, 2014, 04:11:54 pm »
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Has anyone had a sac on drosophila flies yet? If so, are we supposed to know about linked genes for it? Feel free to PM me!!

vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2583 on: August 12, 2014, 06:00:31 pm »
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Has anyone had a sac on drosophila flies yet? If so, are we supposed to know about linked genes for it? Feel free to PM me!!

Drosophila can be used for practically everything you do in genetics.
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Sense

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2584 on: August 12, 2014, 10:10:27 pm »
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What hypothesis would you write for an experiment that basically just involves flipping coins with the possible genes on each side to simulate a cross, then comparing the results/ratios to the expected results/ratios using a Punnett square?

Maybe, If you flip a coin multiple times simulating a cross, then you will get similar results to the ones expected from a Punnett square ? Or is that too vague?

I can't seem to word them right..
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Reus

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2585 on: August 12, 2014, 10:48:44 pm »
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What hypothesis would you write for an experiment that basically just involves flipping coins with the possible genes on each side to simulate a cross, then comparing the results/ratios to the expected results/ratios using a Punnett square?

Maybe, If you flip a coin multiple times simulating a cross, then you will get similar results to the ones expected from a Punnett square ? Or is that too vague?

I can't seem to word them right..
When we did this, we won't required to write an hypothesis! Perhaps you won't be?
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katiesaliba

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2586 on: August 12, 2014, 11:06:37 pm »
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Are upstream and promotor regions the same thing?
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nerdmmb

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2587 on: August 12, 2014, 11:20:53 pm »
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Are upstream and promotor regions the same thing?

Pretty much :) upstream regions contain promotor regions.

vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2588 on: August 13, 2014, 08:25:51 am »
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Are upstream and promotor regions the same thing?

The promoter region is where DNA pol binds. Upstream means towards the three prime end. So if you're at a base pair, downstream is towards the 5' end and upstream towards the 3' end.
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Sense

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2589 on: August 13, 2014, 04:22:49 pm »
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When we did this, we won't required to write an hypothesis! Perhaps you won't be?

I had to do it today, I ended up writing:

If two coins, representing a man and woman's genes for a certain trait are flipped multiple times, simulating a monohybrid cross, then the ratio of genotypes the children acquire will be the same as the expected genotypes from the Punnett square.

I hope it isn't completely wrong... I didn't know wether to put 'will be the same' or 'will be similar'.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2014, 04:36:59 pm by Sense »
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Stressedyear11here

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2590 on: August 13, 2014, 05:19:51 pm »
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How do you tell heterozygous and homozygous, and alleles on gel electrophoresis?

Cheers

theBRENDAN97

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2591 on: August 13, 2014, 05:43:00 pm »
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Need help with a dihybrid cross Q,
In horses, black is dependent upon a dominant gene, B, and chestnut upon its recessive allee, b. The trotting gait is due to a dominant gene, T, the pacing gait to its recessive allele, t. If a homozygous black pacer is mated to a homozygous chestnut trotter, what will be the appearance of the F1 generation?

B=black         T=trotting gait
b=chestnut    t=pacing gait
*Homozygous black pacer = BBtt
- possible gamete combinations: Bt
*Homozygous chestnut trotter = bb, T- (would the other allele be a dominant T?)
Thanks.
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vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2592 on: August 13, 2014, 06:35:48 pm »
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How do you tell heterozygous and homozygous, and alleles on gel electrophoresis?

Cheers

Homozygous: one band
Heterozygous: two bands
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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2593 on: August 13, 2014, 06:49:06 pm »
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To what extent do we have to know about fossils the differences between different homo species?

Reus

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2594 on: August 13, 2014, 09:15:22 pm »
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Coevolution has lead to an increase in biodiversity because when an organism evolves, this works as a selection pressure against organisms who are reliant on the previous mechanisms of the original organism, where in response the organism who is selected against needs to evolve in order to abstain the changes. These new features or structures contribute to the biodiversity.

Would this be deemed as correct? (Just answering a question on how coevo leads to biodiversity) 
« Last Edit: August 13, 2014, 09:18:43 pm by Reus »
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