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July 24, 2019, 08:00:27 am

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 1269256 times)  Share 

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howlingwisdom

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2400 on: July 27, 2014, 07:47:02 pm »
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Hi, again.
I'm getting confused with test crosses...

So, it determines whether the genotype of the unknown dominant is heterozygous dominant or homozygous dominant. If homozygous dominant, 100% dominant and if heterozygous dominant then, 50% recessive and 50% dominant. How do I know which it is? That is, whether the unknown is heterozygous dominant or homozygous dominant?

Thank you :)
In order to see whether it is heterozygous or homozygous dominant you look at the offspring. If all of the offspring phenotypes are dominant, then it is likely that the parent is homozygous dominant. If at least one of the offspring shows a recessive trait/if 50% if the offspring shows a recessive trait, then it is heterozygous.
Hope this helps!
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Stressedyear11here

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2401 on: July 27, 2014, 08:20:55 pm »
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In order to see whether it is heterozygous or homozygous dominant you look at the offspring. If all of the offspring phenotypes are dominant, then it is likely that the parent is homozygous dominant. If at least one of the offspring shows a recessive trait/if 50% if the offspring shows a recessive trait, then it is heterozygous.
Hope this helps!

Yes this did help :)
Thanks a bunch!!

katiesaliba

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2402 on: July 27, 2014, 11:14:21 pm »
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Does annealing specifically concern hydrogen bonds forming between base pairs, or does it include the condensation polymerisation of the sugar-phosphate backbone as well?

For electrophoresis, is this correct:
Loading gel stains DNA and travels faster than the smallest fragments of DNA in order to track the DNA movement.
Staining gel, however, allows the DNA fragments to fluoresce under UV light.

 
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Scooby

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2403 on: July 27, 2014, 11:19:43 pm »
+1
Does annealing specifically concern hydrogen bonds forming between base pairs, or does it include the condensation polymerisation of the sugar-phosphate backbone as well?

Just the pairing of complementary base sequences by H bonds - doesn't include synthesis of the polynucleotides themselves
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nerdmmb

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2404 on: July 27, 2014, 11:20:51 pm »
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Does annealing specifically concern hydrogen bonds forming between base pairs, or does it include the condensation polymerisation of the sugar-phosphate backbone as well?

For electrophoresis, is this correct:
Loading gel stains DNA and travels faster than the smallest fragments of DNA in order to track the DNA movement.
Staining gel, however, allows the DNA fragments to fluoresce under UV light.

The smaller DNA fragments move faster towards the positive end of the gel than the longer DNA fragments, if I'm not mistaken :)

katiesaliba

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2405 on: July 27, 2014, 11:27:12 pm »
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The smaller DNA fragments move faster towards the positive end of the gel than the longer DNA fragments, if I'm not mistaken :)

I know this, but doesn't the loading gel travel faster than all DNA fragments?
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 02:23:58 pm by katiesaliba »
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howlingwisdom

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2406 on: July 28, 2014, 02:12:18 pm »
+1
Can someone please tell me if the following are the only gene technologies that we need to know?

-Gel electrophoresis
-Gene cloning
-Polymerase chain reaction
-RNA interference

And just to confirm, are we required to know about the southern blot technique?

Thanks heaps! :D
I would also add DNA profiling, microarrays and DNA sequencing to your list.

My teacher said that it is unlikely that we'll be asked about the southern blotting technique on the exam (since it is has never come up before) but it wouldn't hurt to know what it is/its purpose.
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nerdmmb

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2407 on: July 28, 2014, 06:33:28 pm »
+1
Thanks Howlingwisdom! :D

Just wondering guys, what is the best way to review an exam?

Someone had recommended to me to keep attempting an exam until I score 100 in it however i feel like this method is really time consuming.
I try to review my exam by going through all the questions and redoing the questions I got wrong.

I'm not sure how effective this method is though...

Any advice would be much appreciated! Thanks!

nerdmmb

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2408 on: July 28, 2014, 09:48:08 pm »
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Sorry for bombarding this thread with so many questions :S

Unit 4 is quite ambiguous :/

In gel electrophoresis, are short tandem repeats the only DNA fragments that are used? If so, then why is this the case- why can't all DNA fragments be tested?

Thanks! :)

Reus

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2409 on: July 28, 2014, 09:57:27 pm »
+2
Sorry for bombarding this thread with so many questions :S

Unit 4 is quite ambiguous :/

In gel electrophoresis, are short tandem repeats the only DNA fragments that are used? If so, then why is this the case- why can't all DNA fragments be tested?

Thanks! :)
I know that STRs are highly specific to an individual and in a sense are perfect when practicing gel electrophoresis as it aims to identify the organism, sample, forensic appliances etc.
However I'm not too sure about why all DNA fragments can not be tested :/
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nerdmmb

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2410 on: July 28, 2014, 10:17:37 pm »
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I know that STRs are highly specific to an individual and in a sense are perfect when practicing gel electrophoresis as it aims to identify the organism, sample, forensic appliances etc.
However I'm not too sure about why all DNA fragments can not be tested :/

According to the Biotech website, "STRs are found at different places or genetic loci in a person’s DNA"

Maybe the STRs of biologically related individuals share the same genetic loci. So this may be the reason why it's used, I think.

vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2411 on: July 28, 2014, 10:23:22 pm »
+1
Sorry for bombarding this thread with so many questions :S

Unit 4 is quite ambiguous :/

In gel electrophoresis, are short tandem repeats the only DNA fragments that are used? If so, then why is this the case- why can't all DNA fragments be tested?

Thanks! :)

STRs are good because they give you fragments and because they mutate relatively quickly (no selective pressures). Most of human DNA is identical to other human DNA, so these sequences give you enough variation to deliver a meaningful result.
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simpak

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2412 on: July 29, 2014, 07:14:42 am »
+1
Thanks Howlingwisdom! :D

Just wondering guys, what is the best way to review an exam?

Someone had recommended to me to keep attempting an exam until I score 100 in it however i feel like this method is really time consuming.
I try to review my exam by going through all the questions and redoing the questions I got wrong.

I'm not sure how effective this method is though...

Any advice would be much appreciated! Thanks!

That method is obviously more effective than repeating things you already got right.  Just go through the exam, figure out which ones you got wrong, leave them for a week or so while you go through other papers and then come back to only those questions when they're not as fresh in your mind as following the correction process, and reattempt them then.
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nerdmmb

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2413 on: July 29, 2014, 01:22:25 pm »
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In a monohybrid and dihybrid cross, which of Mendel's laws is established?

Thanks!

katiesaliba

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #2414 on: July 29, 2014, 03:06:27 pm »
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Does loading dye stain the DNA samples or does it run in advance?
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