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January 25, 2021, 09:11:05 am

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 1976081 times)  Share 

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Coolgalbornin03Lo

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13245 on: November 12, 2020, 09:45:12 pm »
0
In Q18 MCQ of 2018 exam why is it an animal hormone if it diffuses into target cell? I thought animal hormones were always proteins????
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ActivationEnergy

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13246 on: November 12, 2020, 10:09:13 pm »
+3
In Q18 MCQ of 2018 exam why is it an animal hormone if it diffuses into target cell? I thought animal hormones were always proteins????
Animal hormones undergo endocrine signalling which is essentially travelling in the bloodstream and long distances to target cells. In the image, it can be seen that the source cell releases molecules which travel through a blood vessel. Therefore, indicative of an animal hormone.

Bri MT

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13247 on: November 12, 2020, 10:11:45 pm »
+4
In Q18 MCQ of 2018 exam why is it an animal hormone if it diffuses into target cell? I thought animal hormones were always proteins????

Animal hormones can be protein or lipid based. E.g. estrogen and testosterone are definitely not proteins

Coolgalbornin03Lo

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13248 on: November 12, 2020, 10:21:37 pm »
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Is it acceptable to call them T-cells in the cell mediated response?

I.e Naive T cells proliferate into cytotoxic T cells and T memory cells?
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Bri MT

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13249 on: November 12, 2020, 10:49:52 pm »
+5
Is it acceptable to call them T-cells in the cell mediated response?

I.e Naive T cells proliferate into cytotoxic T cells and T memory cells?

Calling them t cells is fine, VCAA has done this many times in the past


Edit: if you have an exam tomorrow pulling an all-nighter is a bad idea, please get some sleep
« Last Edit: November 12, 2020, 10:56:04 pm by Bri MT »

WhatisaMeMe

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13250 on: November 12, 2020, 11:07:03 pm »
+14
yo good luck everybody for bio exam tommorow also i would like to take this opportunity to thank all the members of atarnotes biology thread for helping me through this tough journey by answering my questions ect. thanks :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :D :D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
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Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13251 on: November 13, 2020, 06:52:56 pm »
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For this question
Peer review is essential to the scientific process because
A several experts in the field are able to scrutinise a finding before it can be published
B the process immediately validated any hypotheses tested in the experiments
C  the process can lead to improvements in articles prior to being published
D it is the primary means for informing the general public about new information in the field
E it tests hypotheses proposed by other investigators

Would this be a and why canít it be c

laura_

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13252 on: November 13, 2020, 09:45:15 pm »
+7
For this question
Peer review is essential to the scientific process because
A several experts in the field are able to scrutinise a finding before it can be published
B the process immediately validated any hypotheses tested in the experiments
C  the process can lead to improvements in articles prior to being published
D it is the primary means for informing the general public about new information in the field
E it tests hypotheses proposed by other investigators

Would this be a and why canít it be c

That's a tricky one! When I look at that question, although I think that answer C is right (peer review can lead to article improvement) I don't think that this is the key reason it is essential to the scientific process. Peer review is important for maintaining the integrity of science and helps to stop crackpots from publishing anything and being seen as reputable by others. I think that A is more correct as it better addresses the question. Does that make sense?
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Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13253 on: November 13, 2020, 09:59:37 pm »
0
Yes that makes sense. Thanks!

Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13254 on: November 13, 2020, 11:11:56 pm »
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For this would this be fine for relating characteristics of structure to function

laura_

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13255 on: November 14, 2020, 06:23:12 am »
+5
For this would this be fine for relating characteristics of structure to function

Hey Chocolatepistachio,
Your answers and good, but a way of elevating them would be to emphasise the way that the structure enables the function.

I know that the space to write is really tiny, so this may not all fit, but for the chloroplasts, you could write something along the lines of: The chlorophyll pigment in the thylakoids allows light energy to be absorbed, powering the light-dependent reactions within the disks.

In my answer I've focused on the two features given in the question and how working together they assist chloroplasts to perform their function (photosynthesising and producing glucose).

In the answer you've given for ribosomes, a way of shifting the focus would be to discuss the second structural point they gave about the location of ribosomes. You could highlight how free ribosomes can produce and release proteins directly where they are needed in the cytosol of the cell and ribosomes studding the ER can release them to be modified and transported before eventually being packaged into vesicles and released through exocytosis.

Hope that this helps!
« Last Edit: November 14, 2020, 06:37:20 am by laura_ »
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Chocolatepistachio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13256 on: November 20, 2020, 11:39:38 am »
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If someone could help with this question this is what I have written so far
A protein destined for release to the outside of the cell has just been synthesised on a ribosome present on the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Describe the modifications it undergoes in rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus and how it is transported to outside of the cells (5 marks)

The rough endoplasmic reticulum folds the proteins into the correct shape. The protein buds off the rough endoplasmic reticulum in a vesicle and is then transported to the Golgi body. This vesicle then moves to the Golgi apparatus to undergo chemical modifications and packaging. They are then packaged in vesicles for export from the cell by exocytosis.

waterangel82

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13257 on: November 29, 2020, 05:43:55 pm »
+4
If someone could help with this question this is what I have written so far
A protein destined for release to the outside of the cell has just been synthesised on a ribosome present on the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Describe the modifications it undergoes in rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus and how it is transported to outside of the cells (5 marks)

The rough endoplasmic reticulum folds the proteins into the correct shape. The protein buds off the rough endoplasmic reticulum in a vesicle and is then transported to the Golgi body. This vesicle then moves to the Golgi apparatus to undergo chemical modifications and packaging. They are then packaged in vesicles for export from the cell by exocytosis.

This is a good response, but maybe you could add a little more detail to some parts. For instance, the for 'chemical modifications' you could maybe say the addition of sugar groups (although this may be extra detail, as it's been a while since I've done VCE biology) and you could maybe also expand on exocytosis a little bit (such as the fact that the vesicle fuses with the plasma membrane and contents are released outside the cell).
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Oynx

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13258 on: December 01, 2020, 10:31:39 pm »
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Are condensation reactions and condensation polymerisation the same thing? I've had a few resources refer to both but I'm not sure if they are the same thing or not.

Thanks

Evolio

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #13259 on: December 02, 2020, 11:43:34 am »
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Are condensation reactions and condensation polymerisation the same thing? I've had a few resources refer to both but I'm not sure if they are the same thing or not.

Thanks
Hey Oynx!
No, they are not the same thing and thus they are not interchangeable.

They are both similar in that H20 (water) is released. However, with condensation polymerisation, repeating sub units (monomers) are bonded together to form polymers. This is seen when amino acids (the monomers) form peptide bonds with each other to form a polypeptide (the polymer).
Condensation is simply water being released.

Hope this helps!