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July 12, 2020, 11:10:51 pm

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 1735944 times)  Share 

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whys

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12525 on: May 31, 2020, 10:28:38 pm »
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Hey,
My cellular signalling SAC (1hr SAC) is in 5 days and I was wondering if you could tell me what I should do that will prepare me best.
(eg. what are the main points I should remember? are there any specific words I should use in my answers? etc.)
I also don't feel incredibly confident so any suggestions on how i can consolidate my knowledge would be great!
That's a very broad question! (and something you will need to find for yourself :) ) You can do this by consolidating your knowledge through practice questions. They are the best way of learning what keywords you need in your answers to get the marks and will help in building your confidence. Doing questions helps you figure out what each mark is allocated for in a specific question, and the more you expose yourself to different types of questions, the easier you will find it. For the main points you should remember, look over the study design and your notes/textbook. To answer your second question, I think that a great way of consolidating knowledge is teaching others - your family or your soft toys! - the content. You can also create flashcards, visual posters and annotate the study design, but I'm a big believer that the main form of practice you should be doing is questions - they are simply irreplaceable and will prepare you well.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2020, 10:49:26 pm by whys »
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jessieleung

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12526 on: May 31, 2020, 10:43:32 pm »
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That's a very broad question! (and something you will need to find for yourself :)) You can do this by consolidating your knowledge through practice questions. They are the best way of learning what keywords you need in your answers to get the marks and will help in building your confidence. Doing questions helps you figure out what each mark is allocated for in a specific question, and the more you expose yourself to different types of questions, the easier you will find it. For the main points you should remember, look over the study design and your notes/textbook. To answer your second question, I think that a great way of consolidating knowledge is teaching others - your family or your soft toys! - the content. You can also create flashcards, visual posters and annotate the study design, but I'm a big believer that the main form of practice you should be doing is questions - they are simply irreplaceable and will prepare you well.
Where can I find some good questions to complete?

s110820

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12527 on: June 01, 2020, 09:41:26 am »
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Where can I find some good questions to complete?

Hi Jessie!

While I'm not a VCE student, I did a bit of research for you and I found a few resources that you might find useful in your Biology studies:

1. TSFX -> https://www.tsfx.edu.au/vce/subject-blogs/biology/ask-an-assessor-your-biology-questions-answered/

While this website may not have practice questions or topic tests, I found it really useful for how to study biology and how the assessors view the exams.

2. EdUnlimited

Through the EdUnlimited subscription, you can gain access to a multitude of practice exams, practise questions and topic tests. For example, you can find individual practice questions from NEAP and ATAR Notes just to name a few.

Hopefully, this helps, but of course, if you would like me to do a little bit more research, please let me know as I would be more than happy to :)

Best of luck for your biology studies and have a great week!

Kind regards,

Darcy Dillon.
2020 QCE: Biology, English, General Mathematics, Literature and Modern History.

Emily24566:

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12528 on: June 02, 2020, 12:54:48 am »
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An individual is constipated. They take magnesium salts to help loosen the stool why does this work?
Water moves from the blood to the intestines because the blood is hypotonic.

Can someone please explain why this is the answer. Donít really understand

Emily24566:

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12529 on: June 02, 2020, 12:57:32 am »
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Haemoglobin transports oxygen in the blood and consists of a chain of 146 amino acids  . How many different types of amino acids are used to contract proteins

Why is the answer for this question 20 and is it just something you need to know or do you need to do calculations

darkz

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12530 on: June 02, 2020, 08:50:25 am »
+1
An individual is constipated. They take magnesium salts to help loosen the stool why does this work?
Water moves from the blood to the intestines because the blood is hypotonic.
Can someone please explain why this is the answer. Donít really understand

I would assume that when taking magnesium salts i.e. increasing the concentration of magnesium ions, they enter (via diffusion/facilitated diffusion/active transport - don't know which one) intestinal cells thereby increasing the concentration of magnesium ions inside the cells. Therefore, the concentration of magnesium ions inside the intestinal cells will be higher (hypertonic) than the concentration of magnesium ions in the blood (hypotonic), causing water to move into the intestinal cells (osmosis).
Edit: see below for right ans! hehe

Haemoglobin transports oxygen in the blood and consists of a chain of 146 amino acids  . How many different types of amino acids are used to contract proteins
Why is the answer for this question 20 and is it just something you need to know or do you need to do calculations

This question is simply asking for how many amino acids exist in the world, which is 20. For U3&4, this is not something I'd expect students to memorise.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2020, 11:13:47 am by darkz »
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vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12531 on: June 02, 2020, 11:09:26 am »
+3
I would assume that when taking magnesium salts i.e. increasing the concentration of magnesium ions, they enter (via diffusion/facilitated diffusion/active transport - don't know which one) intestinal cells thereby increasing the concentration of magnesium ions inside the cells. Therefore, the concentration of magnesium ions inside the intestinal cells will be higher (hypertonic) than the concentration of magnesium ions in the blood (hypotonic), causing water to move into the intestinal cells (osmosis).

This is close but not entirely correct.

There are three compartments: the inside of the intestines, the intestinal cells that make up the wall of the intestines, blood vessels that sit under this wall.

Magnesium salts make the inside of the intestines hypertonic. They can't really pass the membrane of intestinal cells, to balance out the tonicity water moves into the inside of the intestine from the intestinal cells by osmosis. This then makes the intestinal cells hypertonic to blood, because water has moved out of the intestinal cells into the intestine. Therefore, osmosis happens between the blood and the intestinal cells too.

It's a bit of a tricky question and one that probably assumes an unreasonable understanding of the basic anatomy of the intestines. Suffice to say, from blood to the intestines is a two-step process.

On the original question of why this works: if there's more water in your poo it's looser.
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Anna254.

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12532 on: June 02, 2020, 12:17:45 pm »
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Where and why is water produced during the process of photosynthesis?
Is it because of the dehydration synthesis / condensation reaction

Some resources include water as a product in the equation whereas others do not. Is it supposed to be included as a product in the equation

GodNifty

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12533 on: June 02, 2020, 12:30:37 pm »
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Where and why is water produced during the process of photosynthesis?
Is it because of the dehydration synthesis / condensation reaction

Some resources include water as a product in the equation whereas others do not. Is it supposed to be included as a product in the equation
Water is taken up by plant's xylem.
You're looking at the non-simplified photosynthesis reaction, where water (on the right hand side) is produced in the calvin cycle.

The reaction is saying that 12H2O molecules are used in the light dependent, then 6H2O are made in the calvin cycle. So overall 6 H2O molecules are used in the light dependent.

Anna254.

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12534 on: June 02, 2020, 12:33:52 pm »
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A particular DNA double helix is 100 nucleotide pairs long and contains 25adenine bases.the number of guanine bases in this DNA double helix would be
A.25
B50
C.75
D. 100

Why is the answer for this question C and not A ?

Thanks

Coolmate

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12535 on: June 02, 2020, 01:07:48 pm »
+1
A particular DNA double helix is 100 nucleotide pairs long and contains 25adenine bases.the number of guanine bases in this DNA double helix would be
A.25
B50
C.75
D. 100

Why is the answer for this question C and not A ?

Thanks

Hey Anna254.! :)

This question looks like it could trip up a lot of students, as the wording of the question is quite confusing.

The answer is 75 (C).
This is because in the question it says there are 100 Nucleotide Pairs (for a particular DNA strand), but because of base pairings (x2), there are 200 separate nucleotides (A, T, G, C). For Example, if Adenine has 25 bases, Thymine must have 25 bases as well. This leaves us with the two bases, Cytosine and Guanine, which mathematically looks like this: 200 - 50 = 150 bases left (for C and T).

Thus, we can conclude that Cytosine has 75 bases and Guanine has 75 bases.

I hope this makes sense and helps!
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s110820

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12536 on: June 02, 2020, 01:19:29 pm »
+2
Hi Anna!

I think I would be able to help you with this question, but of course, if I do make any errors, please don't hesitate to correct me as Biology isn't exactly my strongest subject. Anyway, it is important to note that the question asks you to find the number of guanine bases from a DNA strand of 100 nucleotides long.

In terms of the nucleotide pairings, I use the mnemonic of ATGC, which I remember it by saying "At The Gold Coast" which suggests that each of the beginning letters of each word pairs with each other. For example, "A" or "Adenine" pairs with "T" or "Thymine" and "G" or "Guanine" pairs with "C" or "Cytosine".

The reason why you got the question wrong is that adenine does not pair with guanine, and thus, the number of adenine bases would not be equivalent to the number of guanine bases.

However, to solve this problem, I would recommend using several methods of basic mathematics. For example, you are given two variables -- the number of nucleotide pairs (100) and the number of adenine bases (25). To solve this problem and get the correct answer of 75 guanine bases, you would subtract the number of nucleotide pairs from the number of adenine pairs. See below if you need to provide evidence of how you worked it out for the question:

Guanine bases = number of nucleotide pairs - number of adenine bases
                          = 100 - 25
                          = 75.

Hence, you would get the answer of C (75) rather than the answer of A (25). However, I would personally recommend revising the concept of nucleotide bases/pairings, by using the mnemonic I provided to enhance your understanding of the concept when you do more similar questions whether it may be for practice or in an actual exam setting.

Hopefully, this helps but of course, if you do have any questions, queries or concerns about how I worked out the answer or about biology in general, please don't hesitate to message me or use the forums to your advantage, as the Biology forums are extremely helpful to use in your studies.

Have a great week and kind regards,

Darcy Dillon.
2020 QCE: Biology, English, General Mathematics, Literature and Modern History.

Emily24.

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12537 on: June 02, 2020, 01:23:45 pm »
0
Can someone explain this question and why is the answer for this question b

In pea plants the allele for green pods (G) is dominant over that for yellow pods (g). A plant breeder crosses 2 pea plants and obtains the following my offspring
424 plants with green pods:399 plants with yellow pods

What are the most likely genotypes of the parent plants
A GG x gg
b Gg x gg
C Gg x Gg
D gg x gg

Plants grown in light were supplied with water containing radioactive oxygen atoms. After four hours,an analysis of the chemicals in and around the plants were undertaken. Which of the following would contain the radioactive oxygen atoms after four hours?

A protein
b glucose
C Oxygen gas
D carbon dioxide gas

Why is the answer for this question C??

A plant cell can be distinguished from an animal cell due to the presence of
A cytosol
B a cell wall
C A nucleus
D Chloroplasts

Why is the answer for this question b and not D

Thanks!!

Mod edit(PF): Merged posts :)
« Last Edit: June 05, 2020, 08:05:31 pm by PhoenixxFire »

s110820

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12538 on: June 02, 2020, 01:42:48 pm »
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Hi Emily,

I think I would be able to help you with this question, but of course, if I do make any errors, please don't hesitate to correct me as Biology isn't exactly my strongest subject. Anyway, I think that the best way to help you through this question and hopefully, enable you to solve these questions in the future is to use a Punnett Square. More specifically, a 2x2 Punnett Square since the trait is "monohybrid" meaning that you are only analysing one trait at a time. I have attached an example of a Punnett Square for your question, to the forum post for reference.

When you analyse the inheritance of monohybrid alleles, you will always result in the ratio of a 50% chance of the offspring inheriting the recessive trait or 50% chance of the offspring inheriting the dominant trait. To effectively answer your question, you do not need to think about the ratio of 424 green: 399 yellow, rather you need to use a Punnett Square to deduce the possibilities of the genotypes, not the phenotypes.

Hence, using the image attached as a guide of a monohybrid Punnet Square, it would be deduced that there is a 50/50% chance of the offspring inheriting the recessive or the dominant trait, which would thus, enable you to eliminate the option of "A" as the question mentions that the trait of G is dominant over the trait of Y (which would suggest that the genotypes would be Gg rather than GG which would suggest that the trait is entirely dominant) as well as the options of "C" and "D" as the question asks you to find the genotype of both the dominant and recessive trait, not just one or the other.

However, I would recommend revising the topic of "inheritance" and the methods of determining "inheritance" such as through pedigrees and Punnett Squares to enhance your understanding of the concept when you do more similar questions whether it may be for practice or in an actual exam setting.

Hopefully, this helps but of course, if you do have any questions, queries or concerns about how I worked out the answer or about biology in general, please don't hesitate to message me or use the forums to your advantage, as the Biology forums are extremely helpful to use in your studies.

Have a great week and kind regards,

Darcy Dillon.



« Last Edit: June 02, 2020, 01:49:12 pm by s110820 »
2020 QCE: Biology, English, General Mathematics, Literature and Modern History.

Emily24.

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #12539 on: June 02, 2020, 02:41:03 pm »
0
What is polyploidy and aneuploidy ?

Also whatís aptosis and necrosis

Thanks!!