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October 19, 2019, 06:39:43 am

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 1381536 times)  Share 

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PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10590 on: August 19, 2018, 07:49:11 am »
+5
With this VCAA question from the 2009 Exam 2 paper, could someone please explain how the answer is relevant to technological evolution? I thought it was to do with how changes in technology gave humans increased control over their environment - how is "information being passed on" relevant to it.. I thought it was cultural evolution? Thanks  :P

Q: The rate of technological evolution has been increased by the cultural evolution of Homo sapiens. Describe one example of the effect that cultural evolution has had on the rate of technological evolution.
A: Articulate speech/writing/painting/ceremonies enabled information to be passed on

tbh I find questions about the relationships between biological/cultural/technological evolution and how they influenced each other really confusing
Okay so what this question is really asking is for an example of cultural evolution that allows technological evolution to be fast. Technological evolution requires passing on the knowledge of how to make things so therefore Articulate speech/writing (an example of cultural evolution), which allows this to happen, is the answer.


Hey guys,

  • Major trends in hominin evolution from the genus Australopithecus to the genus Homo including structural,
    functional and cognitive changes and the consequences for cultural evolution
With regards to this dot point, do we need to learn about the pre-human hominins (Australopithecines, Paranthropus, and Ardipithecus) What specifically do we need to know?

Also, which species of the Homo genus should we learn and how much do we need to know?
Am I missing anything from this list: Homo habilis, Homo erectus, Homo floresiensis, Homo heidelbergensis, Homo neanderthalensis.

Thanks!
I think you just need to be able to identify if a species belongs to a particular genus (see Q7 on the 2017 exam) and you need to know general trends that occurred from Austra. to homo. and where para. and ardi. fit along that timeline.

I don't really know how much you need to learn about each of the H. species, but you should be fine so long as you can differentiate between them, know where each fits on the timeline, and know what evolved into humans, and what coexisted with us. <-- This could be too much info, but I don't think you'll need more than that.
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PopcornTime

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10591 on: August 19, 2018, 04:05:17 pm »
0
What is the function of primers in PCR?

The Average Student

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10592 on: August 19, 2018, 05:50:05 pm »
+1
What is the function of primers in PCR?


The function of primers in PCR is to act as a starting point for taq polymerase to build off.
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Azim.m

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10593 on: August 20, 2018, 04:56:08 am »
0
Could someone help with the biological effectiveness of antibiotics and antivirals?

PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10594 on: August 20, 2018, 09:40:44 am »
0
Could someone help with the biological effectiveness of antibiotics and antivirals?
Pretty sure that's just about what types of pathogens antibiotics/antivirals can be used against and why they can't be used against other types (like antibiotics won't kill a virus)
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galaxy21

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10595 on: August 20, 2018, 12:36:03 pm »
0
Hi.
Just wondering, do restriction enzymes cut at recognition sites of 6 or 4-8 base palindromes?
My textbook (nelson) and connect notes said 4-8, however edrolo said 6.
Is it just that 6 is most common, however it can cut at 4-8?
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PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10596 on: August 20, 2018, 01:25:56 pm »
0
Hi.
Just wondering, do restriction enzymes cut at recognition sites of 6 or 4-8 base palindromes?
My textbook (nelson) and connect notes said 4-8, however edrolo said 6.
Is it just that 6 is most common, however it can cut at 4-8?
Yep. 6 is just the most common
« Last Edit: August 20, 2018, 01:40:39 pm by PhoenixxFire »
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Scribe

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10597 on: August 20, 2018, 11:50:50 pm »
0
What was the purpose of the angled arrangement of the femur relative to the tibia, and the purpose of bowl-shaped pelvis and short hipbone?
I'm trying to better understand why they were developed.
Thanks!

Sine

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10598 on: August 21, 2018, 12:27:18 am »
+1
What was the purpose of the angled arrangement of the femur relative to the tibia, and the purpose of bowl-shaped pelvis and short hipbone?
I'm trying to better understand why they were developed.
Thanks!
they are all anatomical adaptations which have allowed bipedalism in the homo genus.

galaxy21

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10599 on: August 21, 2018, 07:21:26 pm »
0
Hi,
So I'm a little confused with DNA profiling - some of the resources I have mention STR's only, whereas others mention VNTR's, and others mention RFLP's... are they all the same process or are they different? And do we need to know all for the exam?
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AngelWings

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10600 on: August 23, 2018, 02:15:21 pm »
0
Hi,
So I'm a little confused with DNA profiling - some of the resources I have mention STR's only, whereas others mention VNTR's, and others mention RFLP's... are they all the same process or are they different? And do we need to know all for the exam?
These are all slightly different things and uses processes that have minor differences, from recollection. Explanations can probably be found online; I don't want to give inaccurate information. As for the last question, I think it's best you checked the study design.
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Sine

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10601 on: August 23, 2018, 03:15:52 pm »
0
Hi,
So I'm a little confused with DNA profiling - some of the resources I have mention STR's only, whereas others mention VNTR's, and others mention RFLP's... are they all the same process or are they different? And do we need to know all for the exam?
VNTRs and STRs are actually the same thing it's just an arbitrary distinction between the length and quantity of those repeats (STRs being shorter and less repeats).
RFLPs are restriction fragment length polymorphisms so depends on certain restriction enzymes and where they cut.

Make sure to check the study design if you are unsure if anything is required/not required. 

Agimo

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10602 on: August 24, 2018, 06:34:02 pm »
+1
If a bacteria successfully takes up a recombinant plasmid, it is considered to be a transformed bacteria. However, would it still be correct to call the transformed bacteria a transgenic organism, as it contains DNA from an organism belong to a different, unrelated species.

galaxy21

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10603 on: August 24, 2018, 07:01:53 pm »
+1
If a bacteria successfully takes up a recombinant plasmid, it is considered to be a transformed bacteria. However, would it still be correct to call the transformed bacteria a transgenic organism, as it contains DNA from an organism belong to a different, unrelated species.

Yeah, that's what we were told.
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Scribe

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10604 on: August 26, 2018, 05:07:02 pm »
0
What is the difference between recognition site, recognition sequence, and restriction site? Are these terms interchangeable? I'm unsure as to what they mean in terms of endonucleases.
Thanks!