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September 22, 2019, 12:16:04 pm

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 1336540 times)  Share 

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IneffableLife

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10530 on: July 03, 2018, 11:31:48 pm »
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Is blood clotting first or second line of defense? I have asked teachers who have given me mixed answers.

Springyboy

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10531 on: July 04, 2018, 08:55:41 am »
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Is blood clotting first or second line of defense? I have asked teachers who have given me mixed answers.

As per here http://www.vce.bioninja.com.au/aos-2-detecting-and-respond/defence-against-disease/second-line-of-defence.html it's part of the second line of defence as the first line of defence is only intact skin and mucous membranes. Blood clotting occurs via platelets issuing a non-specific response to an intrusion to the body, which is characterised via the second line of defence as the platelets issue a response only in the second line.

Hope that clears things up,

James

vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10532 on: July 04, 2018, 07:42:10 pm »
+1
As per here http://www.vce.bioninja.com.au/aos-2-detecting-and-respond/defence-against-disease/second-line-of-defence.html it's part of the second line of defence as the first line of defence is only intact skin and mucous membranes. Blood clotting occurs via platelets issuing a non-specific response to an intrusion to the body, which is characterised via the second line of defence as the platelets issue a response only in the second line.

Hope that clears things up,

James

I'm not really sure this is right tbh. More than anything this probably exposes one of the reasons why most immunologists really dislike the terms first, second and third line. Even though blood clotting requires a complex of cells and vascular proteins to work, the way by which it works is effectively a first line defence (i.e. physically preventing things from entering the body).

Either way, you'll never really be askedóit's probably not that important.
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PopcornTime

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10533 on: July 05, 2018, 05:22:08 pm »
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I'm not really sure this is right tbh. More than anything this probably exposes one of the reasons why most immunologists really dislike the terms first, second and third line. Even though blood clotting requires a complex of cells and vascular proteins to work, the way by which it works is effectively a first line defence (i.e. physically preventing things from entering the body).

Either way, you'll never really be askedóit's probably not that important.

I thought it would be part of the second line of defence because it works in conjunction with the inflammatory process (which is 2nd line).

darkz

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10534 on: July 05, 2018, 05:27:36 pm »
+1
I thought it would be part of the second line of defence because it works in conjunction with the inflammatory process (which is 2nd line).

Well even though it is quite debatable to whether it is in the 1st or 2nd line of defence, as vox said, you would never really be asked specifically about the 1st/2nd line of defence in a vcaa exam - rather you'd be asked in terms of either the innate or adaptive immune system, so it doesn't really matter
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Sine

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10535 on: July 05, 2018, 05:29:45 pm »
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I thought it would be part of the second line of defence because it works in conjunction with the inflammatory process (which is 2nd line).
1st 2nd and 3rd lines of defences are kind of misleading since they are all integrated and work together. This terminology isn't used too much beyond biology in an educational context.

In vce I did learn it as the 2nd line of defence but I can see how it could be argued as first too.

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10536 on: July 06, 2018, 05:37:16 pm »
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Quick question - in apoptosis, is the step where the blebs are removed via phagocytosis considered a part of the process of apoptosis? Or does it occur "after" apoptosis? Just wondering bc I went to a lecture recently where the lecturer said they were separate, thanks :)
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darkz

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10537 on: July 06, 2018, 05:41:14 pm »
+1
Quick question - in apoptosis, is the step where the blebs are removed via phagocytosis considered a part of the process of apoptosis? Or does it occur "after" apoptosis? Just wondering bc I went to a lecture recently where the lecturer said they were separate, thanks :)

Well in a past vcaa exam, they did not accept the phagocytosis of blebs to be apart of apoptosis, so your lecturer would be correct
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napkin101

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10538 on: July 07, 2018, 08:49:09 pm »
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How well do we need to know about RNA polymerase? I've been searching around the webs and the only thing I can really find is that it 'catalyses the synthesis of RNA from DNA'. Do we need to know much more than that?

Thanks! :D

darkz

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10539 on: July 07, 2018, 09:50:00 pm »
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How well do we need to know about RNA polymerase? I've been searching around the webs and the only thing I can really find is that it 'catalyses the synthesis of RNA from DNA'. Do we need to know much more than that?

Thanks! :D

Yeh, that is pretty much correct, however I would say that it catalyses the synthesis of pre-mRNA instead of just RNA, as that is quite vague - you could also talk about how it binds to the promoter and then travels along the template strand etc
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vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10540 on: July 07, 2018, 10:29:05 pm »
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Yeh, that is pretty much correct, however I would say that it catalyses the synthesis of pre-mRNA instead of just RNA, as that is quite vague - you could also talk about how it binds to the promoter and then travels along the template strand etc

You'd probably be just as safe saying RNA or mRNA. There are actually different RNA polymerases that make different types of RNA :) So it's an RNA polymerase that makes tRNA, and an RNA polymerase that makes rRNA
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galaxy21

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10541 on: July 08, 2018, 06:41:03 pm »
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Hi,
So we have just started on area of study 2 of unit 4, and I'm kinda confused :o
Can somebody please explain to me the correlation between GMO's and transgenic organisms, and knock-out/in organisms?
Are transgenic organisms a type of GMO?
And are knock-in and knock-out organisms classified as GMO's or transgenic organisms or what?

Sorry...just trying to get my head around the topic before we head back into term 3 ;)
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PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10542 on: July 08, 2018, 09:22:04 pm »
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Hi,
So we have just started on area of study 2 of unit 4, and I'm kinda confused :o
Can somebody please explain to me the correlation between GMO's and transgenic organisms, and knock-out/in organisms?
Are transgenic organisms a type of GMO?
And are knock-in and knock-out organisms classified as GMO's or transgenic organisms or what?
I never actually learnt about knock in or knockout organisms, itís not mentioned on the study design but if your teacher is telling you about them then you should learn them for your SAC.

A GMO is a genetically modified organism - regardless of the type of modification.

A transgenic organism is one that contains a gene from a different species.

A transgenic organism is a type of GMO, but not all GMOís are transgenic.

I tried to look up knock in and knock out organisms, but what I found was contradictory. They are definitely GMOís, however Iím not entirely sure if they are transgenic - perhaps it depends on the individual case. If you get a question on them it will probably be in a scenario so it should tell you. If it has a gene from another species itís transgenic, if itís just had random DNA inserted/changed itís a GMO, but is not transgenic.

Sorry...just trying to get my head around the topic before we head back into term 3 ;)
You never need to apologise for asking questions :)
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galaxy21

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10543 on: July 09, 2018, 11:37:39 am »
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I never actually learnt about knock in or knockout organisms, itís not mentioned on the study design but if your teacher is telling you about them then you should learn them for your SAC.

A GMO is a genetically modified organism - regardless of the type of modification.

A transgenic organism is one that contains a gene from a different species.

A transgenic organism is a type of GMO, but not all GMOís are transgenic.

I tried to look up knock in and knock out organisms, but what I found was contradictory. They are definitely GMOís, however Iím not entirely sure if they are transgenic - perhaps it depends on the individual case. If you get a question on them it will probably be in a scenario so it should tell you. If it has a gene from another species itís transgenic, if itís just had random DNA inserted/changed itís a GMO, but is not transgenic.

[/quote]

Thank you so much, that makes a lot more sense now! I tried looking in the study design and couldn't find anything, however it was mentioned in my textbook (Nelson) and also in the ATARNotes complete course notes book, so I figured it would probably be a good idea to understand.
Thanks again!
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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10544 on: July 11, 2018, 06:09:29 pm »
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Hey all,

How important is this dot point from the study design? How much do we need to know? Nature of Biology is full of information that is probably unnecessary to the VCE course.

Changes in biodiversity over time
  • - significant changes in life forms in Earthís geological history including the rise of multicellular organisms, animals on land, the first flowering plants and mammals