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September 22, 2019, 11:44:52 am

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 1336522 times)  Share 

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darkz

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10380 on: May 29, 2018, 09:01:33 pm »
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Why is it that active immunity is long-lived whereas passive immunity is short-lived?
- due to presence of memory cells in the body which are able to produce antibodies

Yeh, that seems right - the memory cells allow the long lived nature of active immunity
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FabAsianZung

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10381 on: May 29, 2018, 10:41:26 pm »
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"Design process in experiments"

What is this? And what do you need to know according to the study design? How is this gonna be applied to experimental SACs?

Thanks beforehand!
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PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10382 on: May 29, 2018, 11:05:33 pm »
+1
"Design process in experiments"

What is this? And what do you need to know according to the study design? How is this gonna be applied to experimental SACs?

Thanks beforehand!
It basically just means that you need to know how to design an experiment. If you go to the study design and look at Unit 4 AOS 3 it has a list of everything you need to know. The main things are:
-Positive and/or negative controls
-Large sample size
-Repeat the experiment
-IV is valid
-You can measure your DV properly

For experimental SACs you'll likely be asked what the control/independent/dependent variables are or you'll be asked for ways to improve validity/reliability/accuracy (if you've covered this in class already, you may not have), or you could be asked how to improve an experiment (generally there will be an obvious mistake e.g. small sample size)
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vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10383 on: May 30, 2018, 06:50:06 pm »
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"Design process in experiments"

What is this? And what do you need to know according to the study design? How is this gonna be applied to experimental SACs?

Thanks beforehand!

also worth adding to the above that it means you should be able to interpet the results of experiments and comment on how the method of the experiment could be improved. This is now a fairly important topic in all of science in VCE and isn't typically taught that well sadly!
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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10384 on: May 30, 2018, 08:03:36 pm »
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I'm having my exam soon and I'm currently having difficulty finding what "experimental design" is. Would anybody be able to state what this is? Thanks <3
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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10385 on: May 30, 2018, 08:07:07 pm »
+2
I'm having my exam soon and I'm currently having difficulty finding what "experimental design" is. Would anybody be able to state what this is? Thanks <3
Hola!
The experimental design is kind of like the blueprint for a practical task or your work. A step by step instruction sheet you can refer to for your study? It's typically a term used in psychology. :)
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vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10386 on: May 30, 2018, 08:45:15 pm »
+2
Hola!
The experimental design is kind of like the blueprint for a practical task or your work. A step by step instruction sheet you can refer to for your study? It's typically a term used in psychology. :)

Not just in psych anymore thankfully! They've taken from the psych course and extended it to all of the sciences :)

One of the great contributions psych makes to a lot of people is an appreciation for good experimental design, whcih is ironic actually because psych has a really bad reputation for designing experiments :p
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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10387 on: May 30, 2018, 11:46:51 pm »
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How would one describe the "transduction" step for hydrophobic signalling molecules, because for hydrophilic it is synthesis of second messengers? If someone was to describe signal transduction in general, wouldn't there be a different transduction process?


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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10388 on: May 31, 2018, 12:07:32 am »
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How would one describe the "transduction" step for hydrophobic signalling molecules, because for hydrophilic it is synthesis of second messengers? If someone was to describe signal transduction in general, wouldn't there be a different transduction process?



The transduction step for hydrophobic signalling involves the movement of the signal-receptor complex to the nucleus and subsequent steps required for a response to take place (i.e. binding to DNA or activating another transcription factor, transcription, translation etc.)

EDIT: I didn't answer your second question, which I just realised. The definition for signal transduction (stripped right from VCAA): "Signal transduction refers to the series of events that occur after the receipt of a specific signal and which result in a response". This is a highly broad definition that effectively encompasses both hydrophobic and hydrophilic signalling.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 12:15:33 am by TheBigC »

PopcornTime

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10389 on: May 31, 2018, 12:28:41 am »
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The transduction step for hydrophobic signalling involves the movement of the signal-receptor complex to the nucleus and subsequent steps required for a response to take place (i.e. binding to DNA or activating another transcription factor, transcription, translation etc.)

EDIT: I didn't answer your second question, which I just realised. The definition for signal transduction (stripped right from VCAA): "Signal transduction refers to the series of events that occur after the receipt of a specific signal and which result in a response". This is a highly broad definition that effectively encompasses both hydrophobic and hydrophilic signalling.

Yep that makes sense. But then what about describing the 3 steps? How can you describe the "transduction" stage to encompass both hydrophilic/hydrophobic signalling molecules?

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10390 on: May 31, 2018, 07:27:10 am »
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Yep that makes sense. But then what about describing the 3 steps? How can you describe the "transduction" stage to encompass both hydrophilic/hydrophobic signalling molecules?
I would just say it will do this or this, so long as you keep it short you can do that. So like a signalling molecule binds to its receptor, if its hydrophillic it will bind to a membrane bound receptor and undergo signal transduction whereas if its hydrophobic it will enter the cell and bind to an intracellular receptor.
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vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10391 on: May 31, 2018, 07:37:25 am »
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The transduction step for hydrophobic signalling involves the movement of the signal-receptor complex to the nucleus and subsequent steps required for a response to take place (i.e. binding to DNA or activating another transcription factor, transcription, translation etc.)

EDIT: I didn't answer your second question, which I just realised. The definition for signal transduction (stripped right from VCAA): "Signal transduction refers to the series of events that occur after the receipt of a specific signal and which result in a response". This is a highly broad definition that effectively encompasses both hydrophobic and hydrophilic signalling.

Thanks for pointing this definition out. Weve had some disagreement about this here before that I think concluded with a different answer to that, so this clears things up.
Pretty sure that transduction should technically be the relay of a signal by other signals, but it looks like VCE has taken its own alternative view, which is ultimately what matters.
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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10392 on: May 31, 2018, 11:18:34 am »
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Would somebody be able to point out simply what occurs in photosynthesis? Specifically what occurs in the light dependant reaction and the light independent reaction (You don't need to go into immense detail as I'm studying units 1 & 2 at the moment, so just the gist of the process). Thanks :P
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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10393 on: May 31, 2018, 11:34:35 am »
+7
Would somebody be able to point out simply what occurs in photosynthesis? Specifically what occurs in the light dependant reaction and the light independent reaction (You don't need to go into immense detail as I'm studying units 1 & 2 at the moment, so just the gist of the process). Thanks :P
Hey! In layman's terms, photosynthesis is the chemical process used by plants, fungi, protists and some bacteria to create sugars by harnessing sunlight energy and carbon dioxide.
Here's a concise explanation of dependent and independent stages given a few years ago - there are some really good answers in PhoenixxFire's Biology Q&A archive/FAQ, if you want to go check that out. :)
Photosynthesis occurs in two stages:

Light-dependent stage:
1.) This stage takes place in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts.
2.) Light energy is absorbed by chlorophyll molecules; electrons within chloroplasts become energised.
3.) Water is split to form H+ ions and oxygen gas.
4.) NADPH and ATP is formed.

Light-independent stage:
1.) This stage takes place in the stroma of chloroplasts.
2.) Carbon dioxide reacts with H+ ions (provided by NADPH) to produce glucose.
3.) ATP provides the energy for the synthesis of glucose.
4.) Excess H+ ions react with O2- ions to produce water (a by-product).
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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #10394 on: May 31, 2018, 11:37:10 am »
+1
Hey! In layman's terms, photosynthesis is the chemical process used by plants, fungi, protists and some bacteria to create sugars by harnessing sunlight energy and carbon dioxide.
Here's a concise explanation of dependent and independent stages given a few years ago - there are some really good answers in PhoenixxFire's Biology Q&A archive/FAQ, if you want to go check that out. :)
Thankyou! :)
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