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August 24, 2019, 09:21:41 pm

Author Topic: VCE Biology Question Thread  (Read 1310297 times)  Share 

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PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11025 on: October 28, 2018, 08:28:40 am »
+1
I've got a series of questions too -
1) Are Natural Killer cells considered to be a part of cell-mediated immunity?
2) How much do I need to know about aneuploidy and assortment of alleles for the dotpoint on mutations?
3) How much should I know about the change in earth's lifeforms with time? Is it just a general outline of how life has become more complex?
4) Are there any useful resources that I can use aside from practice exams to specifically improve with phylogenetic trees that aren't aimed at year 7 students?
5) What are everyone's go-to examples for ethical dilemmas with gene cloning, genetic screening and DNA profiling?
6) What does the syllabus mean by 'the use of scientific knowledge to identify a pathogen?'
1. No. Cell-mediated immunity is adaptive, natural killer cells are innate.
2. Pretty sure you just need to know about the different types of mutations and how to recognise them/write them (so 2n+1, 3n, etc.)
3.Just a general outline, you don't need to know specific dates, just know what order life evolved in (so single celled -->multicellular, prokaryotes-->eukaryotes
4. Not that I'm aware of.
5. Reduced genetic diversity and associated consequences for natural selection, 'playing god', effects on other people (so if a kid has a hereditary disease e.g. huntingtons, do you tell the parents they also have it?),
6. Stealing this answer yet again
The 'scientific knowledge' is the tests below.
There are actually a few ways to identify a pathogen (bacteria or virus, in this case)
Bacteria:
- agglutination test (with specific antibodies)
- precipitation test (to see if a bacterial colony precipitates in the blood of an infected person)
- Western blot test (used to separate and identify proteins specific to a bacteria)
- ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, which is used to detect and count substances such as antibodies, hormones, enzymes and antigens, which indicates the type of bacteria we might be looking for)

Virus (these things are smaller, so we have to use more precise techniques to kinda sort them out)
- ELISA
- X-ray crystallography (which is used to determine the atomic and molecular structure of crystals, can be used to identify viruses of specific shapes and sizes)
- Electron microscope (these things let you see really small things so you can see viruses with this)

How could the same genetic sequence produce different proteins?
Most likely alternative splicing (there are other ways but that's the one in VCE)

Do we need to know about light chains and heavy chains and parts of an antibody for the exam, cos I havenít really learnt much about that at all  :(
You need to be able to draw and label an antibody (light chains, heavy chains, variable region, constant region, disulphide bridges, antigen binding sites)

Ughhh, my images arenít passing security checks... what do I do?
The other times when I upload images I literally have to compress the image with an app, save to photos, upload to Ďfilesí, then upload onto here... how do I skip the hassle no an iPad??

And now the pics are getting rejected  :'(
Easiest way is probably to upload them to an image sharing site like imgur then click the little drop down arrow on the top right (on the web version, doesn't seem to work properly on the app) then click 'get share links' and copy the one that says BB code and paste it into here.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2018, 08:41:16 am by PhoenixxFire »
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C14M8S

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11026 on: October 28, 2018, 08:46:11 am »
0
1) What is the 'functional importance' of the four levels of protein structure aside from tertiary and quartenary proteins actually doing things?
2) What's the difference between RNA processing and transcription? Would I just refer to the post-transcriptional modifications as RNA processing?
3) How does temperature affect the rate of photosynthesis? I've heard mixed things about this.
4) Where do pheromones originate from usually (i.e what glands)?
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PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11027 on: October 28, 2018, 08:54:48 am »
+1
1) What is the 'functional importance' of the four levels of protein structure aside from tertiary and quartenary proteins actually doing things?
2) What's the difference between RNA processing and transcription? Would I just refer to the post-transcriptional modifications as RNA processing?
3) How does temperature affect the rate of photosynthesis? I've heard mixed things about this.
4) Where do pheromones originate from usually (i.e what glands)?
1. It's basically just that. The protein structure gives it a specific 3D shape that allows it to function.
2. RNA processing occurs after transcription, it's just another name for post transcriptional modifications.
3. You'll have heard different things because VCE oversimplifies it. For VCE, lower temperature result in slower rates of photosynthesis, higher temperatures result in faster rate up to a point, and then the rate drops to 0 as temperatures increase because the proteins are denatured.
4. They're released from exocrine glands, but you can't really be any more specific than that because there's heaps of different types produced in lots of different spots, for example in humans they're produced in testes and ovaries, adrenal, and apocrine glands.
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EllingtonFeint

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11028 on: October 28, 2018, 09:04:39 am »
0
Why are there two exams for some past years?
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PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11029 on: October 28, 2018, 09:06:42 am »
+1
Why are there two exams for some past years?
There used to be 2 exams during the year. The U3 exam was in June and the U4 in November. It changed a few years ago to have one exam for both U3 and U4 at the end of the year.
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EllingtonFeint

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11030 on: October 28, 2018, 09:07:53 am »
0
Q1 what is molecule A? Is it a carbohydrate?? (1st image)

Why is d correct? Is it because 1 fatty acid produces 8 Acetyl CoA? If so, what would be the ATP ratio produced (like fatty acid vs glucose - possibly how many Acetyl CoA would one glucose molecule produce?))
2nd image for the carbohydrate question. Oops... :o

There used to be 2 exams during the year. The U3 exam was in June and the U4 in November. It changed a few years ago to have one exam for both U3 and U4 at the end of the year.

So definitely do both?

Mod edit (PF): Merged posts. You can edit your posts by using the 'modify' button at the top right :)
« Last Edit: October 28, 2018, 09:23:47 am by PhoenixxFire »
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Azim.m

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VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11031 on: October 28, 2018, 09:18:06 am »
+3
2nd image for the carbohydrate question. Oops... :o

Yep. Second image is cellulose which is a polymer of glucose, hence answer would be C

PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11032 on: October 28, 2018, 09:30:52 am »
+3
Why is d correct? Is it because 1 fatty acid produces 8 Acetyl CoA? If so, what would be the ATP ratio produced (like fatty acid vs glucose - possibly how many Acetyl CoA would one glucose molecule produce?))

So definitely do both?
Don't worry about that question, it's not relevant. On that study design you had to know more details about the krebs cycle, which must have included knowing how many acetyl-coA are produced (presumably less than 8), that's the only way I can think of that you'd be able to answer that, so just skip it.

Yep do both. Or if you're doing significantly worse in either U3 or U4 then just focus on that unit. Doing both of them is equivalent to doing one end of year exam.
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EllingtonFeint

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11033 on: October 28, 2018, 09:42:40 am »
0
So, insulin is a hormone
But itís a peptide hormone and peptide hormones are made up of amino acids...so itís also a protein, yes?
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PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11034 on: October 28, 2018, 09:47:48 am »
0
So, insulin is a hormone
But itís a peptide hormone and peptide hormones are made up of amino acids...so itís also a protein, yes?
Yeah basically, like how enzymes are also proteins. Call it a hormone on the exam though, not a protein because hormone is more specific, but yeah that's how it's made.
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EllingtonFeint

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11035 on: October 28, 2018, 09:49:40 am »
0
Yeah basically, like how enzymes are also proteins. Call it a hormone on the exam though, not a protein because hormone is more specific, but yeah that's how it's made.

Sorry for the constant questions... I donít wanna keep starting new replies :-[

If there was no lactase in a cell, would lactose still be broken down but really slowly?
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PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11036 on: October 28, 2018, 09:56:22 am »
0
Sorry for the constant questions... I donít wanna keep starting new replies :-[

If there was no lactase in a cell, would lactose still be broken down but really slowly?
No worries, thatís what this thread is here for :)

For the sake of VCE, assume it doesnít break down at all.
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EllingtonFeint

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11037 on: October 28, 2018, 10:01:16 am »
0
No worries, thatís what this thread is here for :)

For the sake of VCE, assume it doesnít break down at all.

This was in the NEAP paper, and I think I read somewhere that NEAP was kinda a dodgy paper... so just disregard it completely?
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PhoenixxFire

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11038 on: October 28, 2018, 10:04:58 am »
+1
This was in the NEAP paper, and I think I read somewhere that NEAP was kinda a dodgy paper... so just disregard it completely?
Yeah NEAP tends to include things outside of the study design. Theoretically it would still break down very slowly (enzymes just lower the energy required for a reaction to occur, they donít cause a reaction) but VCAA wonít ask you to explain that
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vox nihili

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Re: VCE Biology Question Thread
« Reply #11039 on: October 28, 2018, 10:07:26 am »
+3
This was in the NEAP paper, and I think I read somewhere that NEAP was kinda a dodgy paper... so just disregard it completely?
Yeah NEAP tends to include things outside of the study design. Theoretically it would still break down very slowly (enzymes just lower the energy required for a reaction to occur, they donít cause a reaction) but VCAA wonít ask you to explain that

If any chemistry students are reading this exchange, of course you would know that the reaction proceeds slowly in the absence of lactase; however, for the purposes of Biology I'm with PFótotally irrelevant in VCE.
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