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Author Topic: 50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.  (Read 11737 times)  Share 

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Mafioso

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50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.
« on: December 18, 2013, 06:45:51 pm »
+12
I got a 50 this year and these are some important things that helped me.
In no order:

Become a good writer
Writing is a skill that you must master if you want to score top marks in business. When you're given a limited number of lines and a limited amount of time in both SACs and the exam, you must be able to communicate what you know concisely and eloquently. Avoid waffling on just because there is a whole 'additional space' page at the end of the paper. You are not expected to fill in the damn thing. Do not go to the other extreme and write too little. (insert quality over quantity cliche)


Saturate your responses with BusMan lingo
To be able to do this, you should learn the key terms from each of the study areas. I learnt many of the terms and their definitions from simply revisiting early chapters and casually reading through the content. When you see a word appearing frequently while you read, you can see the context in which it is used and how it is used. Alternatively, you can take the traditional approach and maintain a glossary of key terms with their definitions. Don't stop here. Apply the memorised terms to your writing. This shows your teacher and examiner that you know the content thoroughly. It also separates the outstanding answers from the good ones.


Read widely
Gather as much content-related information as you can throughout the year. Be greedy. Ask your friends for their notes(good luck with this!), use the notes posted on ATARnotes, ask your teacher for supplement material and borrow/buy other BusMan textbooks. The worst thing you can do is only read the textbook that is assigned to you by your school. There are key things that you pick up from external reading that is not included in your textbook. Try to read the business section in the newspaper everyday and keep track of the activities of a few organisations that interest you. These will come in handy when you write your responses because they show that you have reinforced your theoretical knowledge of the subject by connecting it to a real-life example. Reading will make you more familiar with the content.


Make your own notes
Buying checkpoints or A+ summary notes may be a good for revision but remember that these are written from the perspective of other people. I felt that it was best to make summary notes for each area of study one to two weeks before a SAC. Gather all the material you have for a topic, read through the information and type out a set of notes in your own words with your own definitions. Make sure that you understand what you are writing and that you aren't simply writing down a word or a phrase just because it sounds cool. Insert information that is unique yet relevant to the topic you're studying. In your notes you must include visuals or diagrams. There should not be big blocks of writing because if there are, your notes will be no different from the textbook. The whole point of making notes is to summarise the course into a form that is easy for you to understand (flow charts and tables are great). Do this before every SAC and at the end of the year, staple all the notes together and use it as a revision booklet.


Don't fall for the 'practice exam marathon' trap
I did four practice exams. Two were made compulsory at school, one was the VCAA 2011 paper at home under exam conditions and the other one was a Compak paper that took me five hours to complete with long breaks between each question. However, I read through all the past exams up until 2002 and their examiners reports. Even if you don't complete all the past papers, read all the examiners reports before the exam day. You don't even need to print out the exams. Scroll through each and every question and attempt to answer the question in your head. Then go look at the examiners report and compare your answer with the dot points they've given to see if you've covered the main points. If not, make a mental note to read up on the topic and watch out for similar questions as you continue reading. When you've finished reading through a paper, go back to your notes and read up on the topic that you had issues with and try writing out a perfect answer to the question. Once you've finished with all the VCAA papers, do the same with the commercial exams. If you're really good at answering questions on Characteristics of LSOs and you scored well on those questions on your SAC, then don't waste time writing out a response. Until the exam, focus on your weakest topics and during the exam, focus on your strengths. Do at least one exam under exam conditions one week before the exam after you've done reading through past papers. Give this to your teacher and try getting detailed feedback.


Present your responses in a professional manner
The key thing here is structuring. Always paragraph your answers. Teachers and examiners don't want to read though big chunks of writing no matter how good the answer may be. In BusMan, it is best to start of a response with a definition. Identify the key word in the question, define that key word and link your response back to the case study or an external example. Experiment with different structures throughout the year. Different types of questions demand different stuctures. You could approach a 'compare and contrast' question with an introduction defining the key terms, one paragraph on similarities and one paragraph on differences. The 10 mark question should be structured like a proper essay with an introduction and a concluding statement. This is where your English skills come into play.


Aim for 100% in SACs
It may be easier said than done but it is certainly achievable. If you get 90% on your first SAC, it's not the end of the world. Get individual feedback from your teacher. Most of the time, you have to have to approach the teacher. BusMan is a subject where it is really easy to score good marks. It also has a reputation of being an easy subject and because of this it scales down (sometimes ridiculously). By getting a 50, you can escape the scaling. Even if you don't achieve full marks for SACs, aim for Rank 1.


More to come
« Last Edit: January 25, 2014, 03:05:52 pm by Mafioso »
Currently tutoring Business Management [50].  Spots open for 2015

Only Cheating Yourself

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Re: 50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2013, 07:15:05 pm »
0
thanks!  What were you doing over the holidays to prepare and how many hours a weeks were you studying for business?
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Anchy

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Re: 50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2013, 11:07:20 pm »
0
I got a 50 this year and these are some important things that helped me. In no order:

Become a good writer
Writing is a skill that you must master if you want to score top marks in business. When you're given a limited number of lines and a limited amount of time in both SACs and the exam, you must be able to communicate what you know concisely and eloquently. Avoid waffling on just because there is a whole 'additional space' page at the end of the paper. You are not expected to fill in the damn thing. Do not go to the other extreme and write too little. (insert quality over quantity cliche)

Saturate your responses with BusMan lingo
To be able to do this, you should learn the key terms from each of the study areas. I learnt many of the terms and their definitions from simply revisiting early chapters and casually reading through the content. When you see a word appearing frequently while you read, you can see the context in which it is used and how it is used. Alternatively, you can take the traditional approach and maintain a glossary of key terms with their definitions. Don't stop here. Apply the memorised terms to your writing. This shows your teacher and examiner that you know the content thoroughly. It also separates the outstanding answers from the good ones.

Read widely
Gather as much content-related information as you can throughout the year. Be greedy. Ask your friends for their notes(good luck with this!), use the notes posted on ATARnotes, ask your teacher for supplement material and borrow/buy other BusMan textbooks. The worst thing you can do is only read the textbook that is assigned to you by your school. There are key things that you pick up from external reading that is not included in your textbook. Try to read the business section in the newspaper everyday and keep track of the activities of a few organisations that interest you. These will come in handy when you write your responses because they show that you have reinforced your theoretical knowledge of the subject by connecting it to a real-life example. Reading will make you more familiar with the content.

Make your own notes
Buying checkpoints or A+ summary notes may be a good for revision but remember that these are written from the perspective of other people. I felt that it was best to make summary notes for each area of study one to two weeks before a SAC. Gather all the material you have for a topic, read through the information and type out a set of notes in your own words with your own definitions. Make sure that you understand what you are writing and that you aren't simply writing down a word or a phrase just because it sounds cool. Insert information that is unique yet relevant to the topic you're studying. In your notes you must include visuals or diagrams. There should not be big blocks of writing because if there are, your notes will be no different from the textbook. The whole point of making notes is to summarise the course into a form that is easy for you to understand (flow charts and tables are great). Do this before every SAC and at the end of the year, staple all the notes together and use it as a revision booklet.

Don't fall for the 'practice exam marathon' trap
I did four practice exams. Two were made compulsory at school, one was the VCAA 2011 paper at home under exam conditions and the other one was a Compak paper that took me five hours to complete with long breaks between each question. However, I read through all the past exams up until 2002 and their subsequent examiners reports. Even if you don't complete all the past papers, read all the examiners reports before the exam day. You don't even need to print out the exams. Scroll through each and every question and attempt to answer the question in your head. Then go look at the examiners report and compare your answer with the dot points they've given to see if you've covered the main points. If not, make a mental note to read up on the topic and watch out for similar questions as you continue reading. When you've finished reading through a paper, go back to your notes and read up on the topic that you had issues with and try writing out a perfect answer to the question. Once you've finished with all the VCAA papers, do the same with the commercial exams. If you're really good at answering questions on Characteristics of LSOs and you scored well on those questions on your SAC, then don't waste time writing out a response. Until the exam, focus on your weakest topics and during the exam, focus on your strengths. Do at least one exam under exam conditions one week before the exam after you've done reading through past papers. Give this to your teacher and try getting detailed feedback.

Present your responses in a professional manner
The key thing here is structuring. Always paragraph your answers. Teachers and examiners don't want to read though big chunks of writing no matter how good the answer may be. In BusMan, it is best to start of a response with a definition. Identify the key word in the question, define that key word and link your response back to the case study or an external example. Experiment with different structures throughout the year. Different types of questions demand different stuctures. You could approach a 'compare and contrast' question with an introduction defining the key terms, one paragraph on similarities and one paragraph on differences. The 10 mark question should be structured like a proper essay with an introduction and a concluding statement. This is where your English skills come into play.

Aim for 100% in SACs
It may be easier said than done but it is certainly achievable. If you get 90% on your first SAC, it's not the end of the world. Get individual feedback from your teacher. Most of the time, you have to have to approach the teacher. BusMan is a subject where it is really easy to score good marks. It also has a reputation of being an easy subject and because of this it scales down (sometimes ridiculously). By getting a 50, you can escape the scaling. Even if you don't achieve full marks for SACs, aim for Rank 1.

More to come
Fantastic guide, will definitely keep all these points in mind.

Also, congratulations on your 50. :)
Bachelor of Arts/Laws @ Monash University

Mafioso

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Re: 50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2013, 11:13:46 am »
0
thanks!  What were you doing over the holidays to prepare and how many hours a weeks were you studying for business?

Over the holidays I read through the textbook, did the holiday homework assigned to me and started making notes for the first chapter.

It's hard to give you an exact figure but I devoted roughly around 3 hours a week for business.
Currently tutoring Business Management [50].  Spots open for 2015

anna.xo

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Re: 50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2013, 04:09:03 pm »
0
I got a 50 this year and these are some important things that helped me.
In no order:

Become a good writer
Writing is a skill that you must master if you want to score top marks in business. When you're given a limited number of lines and a limited amount of time in both SACs and the exam, you must be able to communicate what you know concisely and eloquently. Avoid waffling on just because there is a whole 'additional space' page at the end of the paper. You are not expected to fill in the damn thing. Do not go to the other extreme and write too little. (insert quality over quantity cliche)

Saturate your responses with BusMan lingo
To be able to do this, you should learn the key terms from each of the study areas. I learnt many of the terms and their definitions from simply revisiting early chapters and casually reading through the content. When you see a word appearing frequently while you read, you can see the context in which it is used and how it is used. Alternatively, you can take the traditional approach and maintain a glossary of key terms with their definitions. Don't stop here. Apply the memorised terms to your writing. This shows your teacher and examiner that you know the content thoroughly. It also separates the outstanding answers from the good ones.

Read widely
Gather as much content-related information as you can throughout the year. Be greedy. Ask your friends for their notes(good luck with this!), use the notes posted on ATARnotes, ask your teacher for supplement material and borrow/buy other BusMan textbooks. The worst thing you can do is only read the textbook that is assigned to you by your school. There are key things that you pick up from external reading that is not included in your textbook. Try to read the business section in the newspaper everyday and keep track of the activities of a few organisations that interest you. These will come in handy when you write your responses because they show that you have reinforced your theoretical knowledge of the subject by connecting it to a real-life example. Reading will make you more familiar with the content.

Make your own notes
Buying checkpoints or A+ summary notes may be a good for revision but remember that these are written from the perspective of other people. I felt that it was best to make summary notes for each area of study one to two weeks before a SAC. Gather all the material you have for a topic, read through the information and type out a set of notes in your own words with your own definitions. Make sure that you understand what you are writing and that you aren't simply writing down a word or a phrase just because it sounds cool. Insert information that is unique yet relevant to the topic you're studying. In your notes you must include visuals or diagrams. There should not be big blocks of writing because if there are, your notes will be no different from the textbook. The whole point of making notes is to summarise the course into a form that is easy for you to understand (flow charts and tables are great). Do this before every SAC and at the end of the year, staple all the notes together and use it as a revision booklet.

Don't fall for the 'practice exam marathon' trap
I did four practice exams. Two were made compulsory at school, one was the VCAA 2011 paper at home under exam conditions and the other one was a Compak paper that took me five hours to complete with long breaks between each question. However, I read through all the past exams up until 2002 and their examiners reports. Even if you don't complete all the past papers, read all the examiners reports before the exam day. You don't even need to print out the exams. Scroll through each and every question and attempt to answer the question in your head. Then go look at the examiners report and compare your answer with the dot points they've given to see if you've covered the main points. If not, make a mental note to read up on the topic and watch out for similar questions as you continue reading. When you've finished reading through a paper, go back to your notes and read up on the topic that you had issues with and try writing out a perfect answer to the question. Once you've finished with all the VCAA papers, do the same with the commercial exams. If you're really good at answering questions on Characteristics of LSOs and you scored well on those questions on your SAC, then don't waste time writing out a response. Until the exam, focus on your weakest topics and during the exam, focus on your strengths. Do at least one exam under exam conditions one week before the exam after you've done reading through past papers. Give this to your teacher and try getting detailed feedback.

Present your responses in a professional manner
The key thing here is structuring. Always paragraph your answers. Teachers and examiners don't want to read though big chunks of writing no matter how good the answer may be. In BusMan, it is best to start of a response with a definition. Identify the key word in the question, define that key word and link your response back to the case study or an external example. Experiment with different structures throughout the year. Different types of questions demand different stuctures. You could approach a 'compare and contrast' question with an introduction defining the key terms, one paragraph on similarities and one paragraph on differences. The 10 mark question should be structured like a proper essay with an introduction and a concluding statement. This is where your English skills come into play.

Aim for 100% in SACs
It may be easier said than done but it is certainly achievable. If you get 90% on your first SAC, it's not the end of the world. Get individual feedback from your teacher. Most of the time, you have to have to approach the teacher. BusMan is a subject where it is really easy to score good marks. It also has a reputation of being an easy subject and because of this it scales down (sometimes ridiculously). By getting a 50, you can escape the scaling. Even if you don't achieve full marks for SACs, aim for Rank 1.

More to come

Congratulations on such an amazing achievement !
2014: VCE
2015: Bachelor of Nutrition Science @ Monash University

Zlatan

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Re: 50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2014, 10:35:51 am »
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How many marks did you lose throughout the year ??

and Congrats on the 50 !!  :D
Endure the pain of discipline now, or suffer the pain of regret later.

2014: Business Management {47}
2015: Methods {40} ~ Specialist {35} ~ English Language {36} ~ Physics {39} ~ Accounting {43}

ATAR: 98.00

2016 - 2020: Bachelor of Civil Engineering(Honours)/Bachelor of Commerce

brenden

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Re: 50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2014, 10:59:40 am »
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The marks he lost throughout the year are irrelevant and shouldn't be a concern of anyone ITT. Congrats on the 50, good job on this guide!
✌️just do what makes you happy ✌️

brenden

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Re: 50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2014, 12:11:12 pm »
+1
Here's a tip: Don't quote the whole post when replying -__-
I don't see how this will help anyone get a 50 in Bus. Man.
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Zlatan

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Re: 50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2014, 12:30:00 pm »
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The marks he lost throughout the year are irrelevant and shouldn't be a concern of anyone ITT. Congrats on the 50, good job on this guide!

Hey Brencookie,

why do you say the marks lost are irrelevant ??

Cheers
Endure the pain of discipline now, or suffer the pain of regret later.

2014: Business Management {47}
2015: Methods {40} ~ Specialist {35} ~ English Language {36} ~ Physics {39} ~ Accounting {43}

ATAR: 98.00

2016 - 2020: Bachelor of Civil Engineering(Honours)/Bachelor of Commerce

brabray

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Re: 50 in BusMan. Here are some random tips.
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2016, 08:41:38 pm »
0
Want to do practise sac's but teacher is only providing one prac sac before the real sac..
can anyone provide their prac sacs their school has given them
all areas of study
please