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September 22, 2019, 09:31:56 am

Author Topic: VCE Chemistry Question Thread  (Read 934573 times)  Share 

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Jakeybaby

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8100 on: August 03, 2019, 03:05:42 pm »
+4
Two questions:

a) What does it mean by 'systematic name'? Is it the same as saying the IUPAC name?
b) Why does hydrolysis result in the production of a carboxylic acid and an alcohol?
For a), the systematic name is just naming the compound based upon functional groups, carbon chain length etc. So yes, the IUPAC name would be the same.

For b) I'm not sure about the content covered in VCE, but you have acidic hydrolysis and basic hydrolysis. In acid hydrolysis, you can think of the water molecule splitting the ester bond, which produces a carboxylic acid and an alcohol.
In basic hydrolysis, the molecule of the basis splits the ester bond, which produces the carboxylate salt and an alcohol.
I don't think that you'll need to know anything else other than the fact that the water molecule splits the ester bond, I could be wrong however as I've never studied VCE.
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pugs

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8101 on: August 04, 2019, 05:47:25 pm »
0
hey! just wanted to double check (sry if it's a dumb q), do all carbon nmr spectrums only contain singlets?
thank you!  :)
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colline

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8102 on: August 04, 2019, 05:55:11 pm »
+4
hey! just wanted to double check (sry if it's a dumb q), do all carbon nmr spectrums only contain singlets?
thank you!  :)

Yep, there is no splitting in Carbon NMR.
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angrybiscuit

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8103 on: August 05, 2019, 04:12:53 pm »
0
I am having trouble finding experimental design questions (outside VCAA exams). Help would be much appreciated!  :)

Chloe182

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8104 on: August 07, 2019, 07:57:39 pm »
0
I'm currently in year 10 planning to do chemistry next year but pracs give me major anxiety... In year 10 science we only did like two for the semester. Does VCE chemistry involve a lot? It's something I'm willing to Work through but just kind of curious...

Thank you!!

Matthew_Whelan

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8105 on: August 07, 2019, 08:29:39 pm »
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I'm currently in year 10 planning to do chemistry next year but pracs give me major anxiety... In year 10 science we only did like two for the semester. Does VCE chemistry involve a lot? It's something I'm willing to Work through but just kind of curious...

Thank you!!

It depends on your class and teacher, my class haven't done many pracs but when we do its pretty chill. I personally find chemistry very doable (unlike physics) and it is easy to get your head around most concepts.
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Chloe182

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8106 on: August 08, 2019, 10:11:27 am »
0
It depends on your class and teacher, my class haven't done many pracs but when we do its pretty chill. I personally find chemistry very doable (unlike physics) and it is easy to get your head around most concepts.


Thanks so much!

Just another student

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8107 on: August 12, 2019, 07:33:53 pm »
+1
Looking for advice for practice exams. So for every topic for chem out teacher gives us every single VCAA Q since 2002 for revision, so I have basically done most VCAA Q's. Is it worth starting from VCAA 2002 for full practice exams? Those who scored high 40's, did u do lots of company papers?

Lear

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8108 on: August 12, 2019, 07:44:33 pm »
+3

Looking for advice for practice exams. So for every topic for chem out teacher gives us every single VCAA Q since 2002 for revision, so I have basically done most VCAA Q's. Is it worth starting from VCAA 2002 for full practice exams? Those who scored high 40's, did u do lots of company papers?

Didn’t bother with any company papers unless they were 2018 (even then found them to be of terrible quality).
Predominantly did VCAA questions and indeed did do every single exam from 2002 (only relevant questions ofc).
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rani_b

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8109 on: August 14, 2019, 06:41:18 pm »
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Hey guys the below questions are from VCAA 2002:

1). 0.010 mol of chloral hydrate, CCl3CH(OH)2, is dissolved in a pure organic solvent. The resulting solution is made up to one litre exactly. In this solvent, the chloral hydrate dissociates to chloral, CCl3CHO, and water. The chemical reaction for the process is

CCl3CH(OH)2(in solution) CCl3CHO(in solution) + H2O(in solution)

When the reaction has reached equilibrium the concentration of water in the solution is measured to be 0.0020 M.
The equilibrium constant for the reaction at this temperature would be
A. 4.0 × 10–4
B. 5.0 × 10–4
C. 0.20
D. 0.25

The answer is B, and according to the examiner's report: "Students selecting A, made the mistake of omitting to note that, when the 0.010 mol of CCl3CH(OH)2 dissociated to give 0.002 mol of each of two products, then there would be only 0.008 mol of CCl3CH(OH)2 left."

I just don't get why it's 0.008 when it disassociates to give each of the 2 products? Wouldn't you subtract two lots of 0.002?

2). 100 mL of an 0.0100 M aqueous solution of calcium hydroxide will absorb carbon dioxide according to the equation

Ca(OH)2(aq) + 2CO2(g) → Ca(HCO3)2(aq)

The maximum volume, in mL, at STP of CO2 that could be absorbed by the solution is
A. 22.4
B. 44.8
C. 224
D. 448

How do i do this?
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SPQR

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8110 on: August 14, 2019, 07:01:12 pm »
+1
Looking for advice for practice exams. So for every topic for chem out teacher gives us every single VCAA Q since 2002 for revision, so I have basically done most VCAA Q's. Is it worth starting from VCAA 2002 for full practice exams? Those who scored high 40's, did u do lots of company papers?
i think company papers are a good place to start bc they usually ask more foundational theory-based questions to test whether you've gotten the basic concepts down, and the calculations are nowhere as hard as vcaa. but yeah, vcaa questions are way better so try to move away from company papers.
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bacteriophage

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8111 on: August 17, 2019, 02:32:55 pm »
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For mass spectroscopy, do we need to know how to write the equation which produces the parent molecular ions and base peaks? (something about bombarding electrons?? - it confuses me!) I saw a question on a VCAA 2010 exam, but not sure if it's within the scope of the new study design...?
And if so, could anyone provide an example of how you would write it?
Thanks
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^^^111^^^

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8112 on: August 17, 2019, 02:43:37 pm »
+3
For mass spectroscopy, do we need to know how to write the equation which produces the parent molecular ions and base peaks? (something about bombarding electrons?? - it confuses me!) I saw a question on a VCAA 2010 exam, but not sure if it's within the scope of the new study design...?
And if so, could anyone provide an example of how you would write it?
Thanks
I am not too sure, but you most likely should - I'll quote what it states : "the principles and applications of mass spectroscopy (excluding features of instrumentation and operation) and
interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data, including identification of molecular ion peak, determination
of molecular mass and identification of simple fragments". So I guess you could say yes.


xxxjss

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8113 on: August 17, 2019, 09:23:35 pm »
+3
For mass spectroscopy, do we need to know how to write the equation which produces the parent molecular ions and base peaks? (something about bombarding electrons?? - it confuses me!) I saw a question on a VCAA 2010 exam, but not sure if it's within the scope of the new study design...?
And if so, could anyone provide an example of how you would write it?
Thanks
Like you said, bombarding electrons... thus electrons must be a reactant! The way I remember how to write the chemical equation of it is that you add one electron and leave with two,and as you leave with more electrons than you added a cation must be produced to balance the charges;
Take example ethanol, CH3CH2OH + e- --> [CH3CH2OH]+ + 2e-
Also, VCAA seems to like having the cation fragment surrounded by [ ] brackets when your asked to write a certain fragment
Whether or not in the scope, I find that at least being exposed to the chemical equation helps clarify what exactly goes on in that funky machine, specifically ionisation  ;D ;D ;D ;D

persistent_insomniac

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Re: VCE Chemistry Question Thread
« Reply #8114 on: August 18, 2019, 08:46:23 pm »
0
I just have a qs about reaction rates: if temperature is increased, does it mean that at a certain time t, there is more product produced OR does it mean that at there is the same amount of product but produced faster?