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February 24, 2020, 06:24:48 am

Author Topic: VCE Physics Question Thread!  (Read 279940 times)  Share 

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Erutepa

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2325 on: December 24, 2019, 12:57:18 pm »
+2
Hey all! :) I'm new to this whole forum thing so I'm not sure if I'm doing this right :P
Due to a lack of people enrolling in physics 3/4 at our school, I'm doing physics via virtual schooling (similar to distance ed, where you send assignments, sacs and homework online with a virtual schooling teacher) and I've been told that it is very difficult. I have a friend doing it with me so I hope we get through it, is there anything that I should be aware of regarding my situation? Any tips to survive or any resources that anyone has? Anything that would help me because I'm quite worried D: Thanks guys :)
Welcome to the forums EricAyl!

I haven't had any experience with virtual schooling or distance ed but I have had a friend do it. From his experience, the main challenge to overcome was a lack of motivation to study. I think normally one gets a lot of will to study from being in a class environment as having others striving to succeed around you pushes you to do the same. Doing distance ed, my friend found this lack of an actual class and teacher mean he struggled to consistently find the will to push himself to do more than the minimum required work and this was reflected in rather poor scores.  Without having a teacher you see in person regularly or peers that can both inspire you to work harder and help you through difficult topics, the process of learning can become somewhat hard to do mostly independently. That being said, this is probably something that may not be that much of a problem for more self-motivated student.
To remedy this, I would recommend making sure your friend and yourself stick together and help each other through tough bits of content and keep each other excited about doing physics. Maybe schedule a study session with them a couple times a week after school at a library and get into the habit of going through things you don't understand and marking each others questions. Apart from motivating you, teaching and marking for each other are two things that will really help you succeed in any subject regardless of whether or not you are doing distance ed/virtual tutoring.

Another source of motivation might be to maintain a journal where you reflect upon your study/results and in order to really evaluate your progress, what you are doing good, and what you might need to focus on. Regularly evaluating your performance Is something that (I think) is a valuable tool for improving (and when you don't have a teacher you interact directly to push you to improve as such, keeping a jounral can help you do this yourself). You could do this journal in a book/privately, or you could put your academic reflections in a journal on AN (see more about it here ). I personally wouldn't have been able to keep a journal privately through my year 12, but found that having a journal here was much easier to keep updated especially with people checking in a reminding you to update you journal from time to time. Having either a journal here about your endevours learning physics (or all your subjects) also provides a space for you to express any challenges/problems you are facing and for others to provide some wise advice!

Hopefully this might be of some help!
Good luck with physics next year and looking around to seeing you on the forums
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EricAyl

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2326 on: December 27, 2019, 11:41:26 pm »
+1
Golly, I'm glad I have someone with me on this journey then 😅, thank you for the advice! I do hope it all goes well otherwise RIP atar :P Thanks a lot pal, I shall keep your wise words close to heart and act on upon them accordingly!!!!!! Will update (probably) if things aren't too good :)

milanander

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2327 on: December 28, 2019, 11:05:29 am »
+1
Golly, I'm glad I have someone with me on this journey then 😅, thank you for the advice! I do hope it all goes well otherwise RIP atar :P Thanks a lot pal, I shall keep your wise words close to heart and act on upon them accordingly!!!!!! Will update (probably) if things aren't too good :)

Ayyyy we distance people gotta stick together!

Also, just got told this recently - I’ve heard from a friend who did a subject through distance this year that it helps to get a schedule of when each topic will be covered from a high ranking school so that you can make sure you’re staying on track throughout the year.
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redleafbun

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2328 on: January 10, 2020, 05:58:56 pm »
0
Hello, GUys!
I am having trouble understanding the questions, what does it mean by "approximate direction"??
Thanks :D

Erutepa

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2329 on: January 10, 2020, 06:32:42 pm »
+3
Hello, GUys!
I am having trouble understanding the questions, what does it mean by "approximate direction"??
Thanks :D
The question stem shows a diagram with dipole magnets
dipole magnets produce magnetic fieilds like that shown below:

Here the arrows show the direction of the magnetic field. The North pole of a magnet will produce a magnetic acting outwards from the north pole, and the south pole produces a magnetic field acting inwards towards the south pole. The density of the lines (how close they are together) dictates the strength of the field.

For your question, there are two dipole magnets which produce magnetic fields that interact with eachother. For VCE physics you are going to have to know how to draw magnetic fields for a range of situations such as this one here. The magnetic field produced by these magnets is shown below

As can be seen, the north pole of each magnet produces a magnetic acting outwards from the north pole, and each south pole produces a magnetic field acting inwards towards the south pole, with the fields from each magnet interacting to result in the feild shown above. You should also note that at the point exactly between the two magnets, there is not feild due to the equal and opposite magnetic fields from each magnet interating.

Your question asks for the 'aproximate direction' meaning it wants you to aproximately/roughly indicate what the direction of the magnetic field is at the point referenced by applying your knowledge of the resultant magnetific field as shown in the diagram above. The inclusion of the compass in the diagram also indicates that the answer should be interms of those such directions (north, south, east, and west).

Hopefully this answers your question, but feel free to point out anything that I explained poorly or that you don't quite understand  :)
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redleafbun

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2330 on: January 12, 2020, 10:14:06 pm »
+1
AHHHh! I understand now thank you for you thorough explanation!
The question stem shows a diagram with dipole magnets
dipole magnets produce magnetic fieilds like that shown below:
(Image removed from quote.)
Here the arrows show the direction of the magnetic field. The North pole of a magnet will produce a magnetic acting outwards from the north pole, and the south pole produces a magnetic field acting inwards towards the south pole. The density of the lines (how close they are together) dictates the strength of the field.

For your question, there are two dipole magnets which produce magnetic fields that interact with eachother. For VCE physics you are going to have to know how to draw magnetic fields for a range of situations such as this one here. The magnetic field produced by these magnets is shown below
(Image removed from quote.)
As can be seen, the north pole of each magnet produces a magnetic acting outwards from the north pole, and each south pole produces a magnetic field acting inwards towards the south pole, with the fields from each magnet interacting to result in the feild shown above. You should also note that at the point exactly between the two magnets, there is not feild due to the equal and opposite magnetic fields from each magnet interating.

Your question asks for the 'aproximate direction' meaning it wants you to aproximately/roughly indicate what the direction of the magnetic field is at the point referenced by applying your knowledge of the resultant magnetific field as shown in the diagram above. The inclusion of the compass in the diagram also indicates that the answer should be interms of those such directions (north, south, east, and west).

Hopefully this answers your question, but feel free to point out anything that I explained poorly or that you don't quite understand  :)

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2331 on: January 14, 2020, 08:02:56 am »
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Does anyone know if we have to learn about the derivations of the relativistic equations for units 3/4? Thanks.

Bri MT

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2332 on: January 14, 2020, 08:38:09 am »
+3
Does anyone know if we have to learn about the derivations of the relativistic equations for units 3/4? Thanks.

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milanander

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2333 on: January 14, 2020, 08:41:53 am »
+2
Does anyone know if we have to learn about the derivations of the relativistic equations for units 3/4? Thanks.

No. It’s not on the study design.
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redleafbun

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2334 on: January 15, 2020, 07:55:28 pm »
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Hey Guess! I am back with another question :D
 btw i struggle to understand chapter 2 (magnetic, electric fields) any resource recommendation?

Erutepa

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2335 on: January 16, 2020, 10:36:29 pm »
+1
Hey Guess! I am back with another question :D
 btw i struggle to understand chapter 2 (magnetic, electric fields) any resource recommendation?

Hey redleafbun  :)
You seem to have posted multiple questions - are you having trouble with all three, or is there one particular question that has you confused?
I am more than happy to answer your question, but before I do its important for you to have a go at it first and try to explain your current aproach to the question. Don't worry about being wrong as thats all part of the learning process.
Having a go at the question first and showing us your thinking process helps people answering your question figure out what specifically you don't quite get so that we can better help you towards understanding the question.

Interms of recomendations to help develop your understanding of fields, If you are currently a bit confused as to what exactly you need to know it might be a good first step to have a look at the study design here which outlines precisely that (if there are any points which you don't quite understand, feel free to ask about it here :)).
If you see some content listed in the study design that you aren't confident on, it might be good to revisit your textbook and re-read over/make notes on those topics. In addition to reading over the textbook/making notes, I found that making your own diagrams when possible really helped. I think that a fair amount of feild questions (e.g. determining the direction of induced currents) requires the ability to visualise the problem - which I found drawing diagrams helped with. 
While going over content in this way, If there are any really confusing bits that you encounter which you can't understand on your own, myself (and others) are happy to help explain stuff to you, just try to be specific with what you do and don't understand so that we can help you more effectivley.
After going over the bits of content that you are stuggling with, I would recoment jumping back into answering questions (the most effective ones would be exam style questions if you have access to any - These are things like Atar notes topic tests or checkopints).  :)
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TheEagle

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2336 on: January 19, 2020, 12:16:54 am »
0
Hello everyone


I have a question regarding the area under the following graphs:
-gravitational force–distance
-gravitational field–distance

Why is it that we must multiply the area of the (gravitation field - distance) graph by mass, whereas, we don't for the gravitational force one? I have attached the textbooks 'explanation'


I have also attached an example in which the solution multiplies the area by mass


Thank you :)


Tau

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2337 on: January 19, 2020, 12:24:04 am »
+2
Hello everyone


I have a question regarding the area under the following graphs:
-gravitational force–distance
-gravitational field–distance

Why is it that we must multiply the area of the (gravitation field - distance) graph by mass, whereas, we don't for the gravitational force one? I have attached the textbooks 'explanation'


I have also attached an example in which the solution multiplies the area by mass


Thank you :)



Well gravitational field strength is the force divided by mass, and we know that the area under the force displacement graph  is work (by definition). So to ‘recover’ the mass that’s missing from the field strength, we multiply by mass to obtain the force.
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TheEagle

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2338 on: January 19, 2020, 12:34:01 am »
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Well gravitational field strength is the force divided by mass, and we know that the area under the force displacement graph  is work (by definition). So to ‘recover’ the mass that’s missing from the field strength, we multiply by mass to obtain the force.

Sorry, I should have been more specific; I was asking in terms of energy (specifically kinetic energy).

Tau

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Re: VCE Physics Question Thread!
« Reply #2339 on: January 19, 2020, 12:40:27 am »
+1
Sorry, I should have been more specific; I was asking in terms of energy (specifically kinetic energy).

I’m not quite sure what you mean. The area under a force-distance graph is work done, and by scaling a field strength-distance  graph by mass the are is thus the same as under a force-distance,
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